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Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers may have lower levels of spexin harmone

Obese teenagers already show signs of hormonal differences from normal-weight peers that may make them prone to weight gain, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
New mice study unveils mystery of why chronic stress, depression can lead to bone loss

New mice study unveils mystery of why chronic stress, depression can lead to bone loss

A new study has helped to unveil the mystery of why chronic stress and depression can lead to bone loss and increase the risk of fractures. [More]
Low levels of vitamin D in Orkney may explain reason for higher rates of multiple sclerosis

Low levels of vitamin D in Orkney may explain reason for higher rates of multiple sclerosis

Holidays abroad may hold the key to tackling Scotland's vitamin D deficiency, research suggests. [More]
Study finds link between placenta and offspring bone

Study finds link between placenta and offspring bone

Researchers at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, studied 518 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) who underwent bone scans at nine, 15 and 17 years old. Measurements such as thickness, volume and weight, were also taken from the mothers' placenta. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

During the past two decades, vitamin D status, defined as serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, has emerged as a predictor of key clinical outcomes including bone health, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, immune health and survival. [More]
Professor outlines effects of sports-specific counseling on injury outcomes in youth athletes

Professor outlines effects of sports-specific counseling on injury outcomes in youth athletes

Neeru Jayanthi, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Emory University Sports Medicine Center in Atlanta, GA, presented "The Effects of Serial Sports Training Risk Assessment and Counseling in Kids (T.R.A.C.K.)" at the 25th Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine in Dallas, TX. [More]
Substances from tequila plant may help treat osteoporosis

Substances from tequila plant may help treat osteoporosis

Mexican scientist identified substances from the plant that enhance absorption of calcium in the body. [More]
Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that higher levels of vitamin D - specifically serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D - are associated with a correspondingly reduced risk of cancer. The findings are published in the April 6, online issue of PLOS ONE. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

There's no getting around it: Simply getting around is a major issue for older adults.
"People are in nursing homes for two reasons, either they can't think or they can't walk," said Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., director of the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. North Carolina. "We're working very hard on the thinking part, and the walking part is equally important. [More]
Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

For people with prediabetes who are overweight or obese, adding 3.0 mg of liraglutide for three years to a diet and exercise plan may lead to major health improvements, new industry-sponsored research suggests. The results will be presented Monday, April 4, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Very few patients use FDA-approved medications for weight loss, new study suggests

Very few patients use FDA-approved medications for weight loss, new study suggests

Despite guidelines that advocate the use of weight loss medications to treat obesity, and the availability of FDA approved medications, very few patients use this treatment option, a new study suggests. The results will be presented Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

Children and teenagers who take stimulant drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their peers who do not take these medications, a new study finds. [More]
Combining aromatase inhibitors with growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller

Combining aromatase inhibitors with growth hormone may help short adolescent boys grow taller

Aromatase inhibitors, when used for up to three years in combination with growth hormone, may effectively and safely help very short adolescent boys grow taller, new research suggests. The study results will be presented Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston. [More]
Increased consumption of antibiotics in childhood may lead to adolescent prediabetes

Increased consumption of antibiotics in childhood may lead to adolescent prediabetes

Young children who take antibiotics may disrupt their gut's microbial ecosystem and be more likely to develop prediabetes in adolescence, new research from Greece reports. The study results will be presented in a poster Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

A combined vaccine therapy including live Salmonella is a safe and effective way to prevent diabetes in mice and may point to future human therapies, a new study finds. The results will be on Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Blast-related concussions result in hormone changes that lead to poor quality of life among veterans

Blast-related concussions result in hormone changes that lead to poor quality of life among veterans

A study in military veterans finds that explosive blast-related concussions frequently result in hormone changes leading to problems such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, depression and poor quality of life. The research, to be presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston, evaluated hormone levels in 41 male veterans who had been deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. [More]
New research links polycystic ovary syndrome, obesity to asthma in reproductive-age women

New research links polycystic ovary syndrome, obesity to asthma in reproductive-age women

Among reproductive-age women, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as well as overweight and obesity are independently linked with asthma, new preliminary research from Australia suggests. The results will be presented in a poster Saturday, April 2, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
New promising therapy may improve curative potential of islet transplant for Type 1 diabetes

New promising therapy may improve curative potential of islet transplant for Type 1 diabetes

New research suggests pretreating cells with a peptide hormone may improve the success rate of pancreatic islet cell transplants, a procedure that holds great promise for curing Type 1 diabetes. The results will be presented Saturday, April 2, at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, ENDO 2016, in Boston. [More]
Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants, used in many consumer products and known to cause hormonal irregularities, overstimulates an adrenal gland hormone in a way that may lead to the development of cardiovascular disease, new research in human cells finds. Researchers will present their study results Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston. [More]
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