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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Study shows how difficulty making good decisions can make certain people vulnerable to suicide

Study shows how difficulty making good decisions can make certain people vulnerable to suicide

Not even close to every person who faces challenges or lives with severe depression commits suicide. Some people are more vulnerable than others. [More]
PFF, Veracyte partner on U.S. survey exploring patients' diagnostic experiences with interstitial lung diseases

PFF, Veracyte partner on U.S. survey exploring patients' diagnostic experiences with interstitial lung diseases

The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation and Veracyte, Inc. announced that the organizations are partnering on a U.S. patient survey to advance understanding of patients' diagnostic experiences with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

NTNU researchers find link between aggression and gene variant in children

Some children react more strongly to negative experiences than others. Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have found a link between aggression and variants of a particular gene. [More]
Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

Two studies highlight important new discovery around most common genetic defect linked to ALS

In today's issue of Nature, two new studies funded in part by The ALS Association both highlight an important new discovery around the C9orf72 mutation, the most common genetic defect associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Most people assume strokes only happen to octogenarians, but recent evidence suggests that survivors of childhood cancer have a high risk of suffering a stroke at a surprisingly young age. [More]
Common gene mutation may cause brain damage associated with ALS and FTD

Common gene mutation may cause brain damage associated with ALS and FTD

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered some of the first steps in how a very common gene mutation causes the brain damage associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [More]
UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue. [More]
Promising research aims at finding cure for hydrocephalus

Promising research aims at finding cure for hydrocephalus

Scientists are focusing in on promising research aimed at finding a cure for hydrocephalus; and a new initiative funded by the Hydrocephalus Association, the largest private funder of hydrocephalus research in the United States, is uniting these researchers to accelerate their progress. [More]
Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

Study provides insight into how the ability to inhibit an action affects attention and memory

You're driving on a busy road and you intend to switch lanes when you suddenly realize that there's a car in your blind spot. You have to put a stop to your lane change -- and quickly. A new study by Duke University researchers suggests that this type of scenario makes a person less likely to remember what halted the action -- for example, the make and model of the car in the blind spot. [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Newly published research from the Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine explains why up to half of older adults who undergo general anesthesia develop postoperative delirium - the sudden onset of confusion, aggression or agitated behavior that could progress to dementia. The findings indicate that older patients who are undergoing surgery may benefit from a less-potent, slower-acting anesthetic. [More]
New funding supports pilot study that aims to address national crisis in children's oral health

New funding supports pilot study that aims to address national crisis in children's oral health

Researchers at Plymouth University Peninsula School of Dentistry have received funding of around £150,000 from the Medical Research Council to support a pilot study which aims to go some way towards addressing the national crisis in children's oral health, especially in communities of social deprivation. [More]
Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

While some research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids can protect brain health, a large clinical trial by researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older persons. With 4,000 patients followed over a five-year period, the study is one of the largest and longest of its kind. [More]
Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), the most common form of the disease, often have deficits in two neuropsychological functions, autobiographical memory (AM) and episodic future thinking (EFT), which impact quality of life. [More]
Tocagen's Toca 511 & Toca FC receives FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of glioblastoma

Tocagen's Toca 511 & Toca FC receives FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of glioblastoma

Tocagen Inc., a clinical-stage immuno-oncology company, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation to the company's lead immuno-oncology product candidate, Toca 511 & Toca FC, for the treatment of glioblastoma. [More]
Study reveals potential health risks associated with burning of incense in indoor environments

Study reveals potential health risks associated with burning of incense in indoor environments

The burning of incense might need to come with a health warning. This follows the first study evaluating the health risks associated with its indoor use. The effects of incense and cigarette smoke were also compared, and made for some surprising results. The research was led by Rong Zhou of the South China University of Technology and the China Tobacco Guangdong Industrial Company in China, and is published in Springer's journal Environmental Chemistry Letters. [More]

Study looks at patterns of emotion regulation in the brains of abused children

Children who have been abused typically experience more intense emotions than their peers who have not been abused. This is often considered a byproduct of living in volatile, dangerous environments. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) set to find out what happens when these children are taught how to regulate their emotions. [More]
CHLA orthopaedic specialists provide concussion testing to youth athletes from Los Angeles Kings High School Hockey League

CHLA orthopaedic specialists provide concussion testing to youth athletes from Los Angeles Kings High School Hockey League

Sports medicine specialists from the Children's Hospital Los Angeles Children's Orthopaedic Center administered baseline concussion tests to 98 athletes from the Los Angeles Kings High School Hockey League on Saturday, August 22 at the Children's Hospital Los Angeles Valencia Outpatient Center. [More]
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