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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Accuray, Lancaster announces commercial availability of InCise MLC for CyberKnife M6 System

Accuray, Lancaster announces commercial availability of InCise MLC for CyberKnife M6 System

Accuray Incorporated and Lancaster General Health announced today that the first commercially available InCise Multileaf Collimator (MLC) for the CyberKnife M6 System has been received by Lancaster. [More]
People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit a resistance to aspirin may be more likely to have more severe strokes than people who still respond to the drug, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Working with cells taken from children with a very rare but ferocious form of brain cancer, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified a genetic pathway that acts as a master regulator of thousands of other genes and may spur cancer cell growth and resistance to anticancer treatment. [More]
New study could lead to better remedies for insomnia, more effective anaesthetic drugs

New study could lead to better remedies for insomnia, more effective anaesthetic drugs

Scientists have discovered that switching on one area of the brain chemically can trigger a deep sleep. [More]
Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

The early stages of embryonic development shape our cells and tissues for life. It is during this time that our newly formed cells are transformed into heart, skin, nerve or other cell types. Scientists are finding that this process is largely controlled not by the genome, but by the epigenome, chemical markers on DNA that tell cells when to turn genes on and off. [More]
NYU Langone's Michael M. Halassa selected as winner of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship

NYU Langone's Michael M. Halassa selected as winner of 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship

Michael M. Halassa, MD, PhD, assistant professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Medical Center's Neuroscience Institute, has been selected as a winner of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowship. [More]

New study finds that wandering mind can impart distinct cognitive advantage

Does your mind wander when performing monotonous, repetitive tasks? Of course! But daydreaming involves more than just beating back boredom. In fact, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a wandering mind can impart a distinct cognitive advantage. [More]
Love hormone has remarkable influence on the intoxicating effect of alcohol

Love hormone has remarkable influence on the intoxicating effect of alcohol

Oxytocin, sometimes referred to as the 'love' or 'cuddle' hormone, has a legendary status in popular culture due to its vital role in social and sexual behaviour and long-term bonding. [More]
Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists are trying to deliver a stern wake-up call to the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment

Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment are at higher risk of developing dementia if they have diabetes or psychiatric symptoms such as depression, finds a new review led by UCL researchers. [More]

Altering visual cues can impact chronic neck pain

Using virtual reality to misrepresent how far the neck is turned can actually change pain experiences in individuals who suffer from chronic neck pain, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Righttime Medical Care outlines common health concerns linked to cold temperatures

Righttime Medical Care outlines common health concerns linked to cold temperatures

Righttime Medical Care, a leading urgent care provider, has been seeing an increase in injuries related to the record-breaking East coast cold weather and offers advice on keeping safe. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

Discovery could help scientists treat heart problems

The average heart beats 35 million times a year - 2.5 billion times over a lifetime. Those beats must be precisely calibrated; even a small divergence from the metronomic rhythm can cause sudden death. For decades, scientists have wondered exactly how the heart stays so precisely on rhythm even though it contains so many moving parts. [More]
Neuronetrix announces FDA approval of COGNISION System for clinical use

Neuronetrix announces FDA approval of COGNISION System for clinical use

Neuronetrix today announced that it has received 510(k) clearance (K141316) from the United States Food and Drug Administration to market the COGNISION System for clinical use. [More]
Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines are designed to turn the body's own immune system specifically against tumor cells. Particularly promising are vaccines that are directed against so-called neoantigens: These are proteins that have undergone a genetic mutation in tumor cells and, therefore, differ from their counterparts in healthy cells. [More]
Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

A new study developed at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
New partnership aims to create stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders

New partnership aims to create stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders

The New York Stem Cell Foundation and the Stanley Center at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard are partnering to create a foundational stem cell resource to study psychiatric disorders through the production of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from individuals with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. [More]