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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World Scientific Publishing Company. [More]
Nanostructures around brain cells may have role in central nervous system function

Nanostructures around brain cells may have role in central nervous system function

An accumulation of a protein called amyloid-beta into large insoluble deposits called plaques is known to cause Alzheimer's disease. One aspect of this illness that has not received much attention is which role the structure of the brain environment plays. [More]
Ghrelin has potential to stimulate alcohol craving, study reveals

Ghrelin has potential to stimulate alcohol craving, study reveals

Ghrelin is a hormone released by the stomach and it stimulates appetite and food intake. Alcohol is commonly viewed as a psychoactive substance that primarily affects brain function, but it is also a highly caloric food. [More]
High-fat, low-carb diets may help control epilepsy

High-fat, low-carb diets may help control epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of the research published in the October 29, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Biology influences political ideology, find Virginia Tech scientists

Biology influences political ideology, find Virginia Tech scientists

Maggot infestations, rotting carcasses, unidentifiable gunk in the kitchen sink – how much your brain responds to disgusting images could predict whether you are liberal or conservative. [More]
WRF, University of Washington partner to develop iPhone app to find severity of jaundice in newborns

WRF, University of Washington partner to develop iPhone app to find severity of jaundice in newborns

Washington Research Foundation is helping University of Washington clinicians and researchers —one a MacArthur Fellow — to develop BiliCam, an iPhone app that can help determine the severity of jaundice in a newborn without having to draw blood. [More]
UCSD researchers validate EEG test to study, treat schizophrenia

UCSD researchers validate EEG test to study, treat schizophrenia

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options. [More]
Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Small differences in as many as a thousand genes contribute to risk for autism, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and the Autism Sequencing Consortium, and published today in the journal Nature. [More]
Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

Researchers use DNA sequencing to uncover genes that heighten autism risk

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have used DNA sequencing to uncover dozens of genes that heighten the risk for autism. Joseph Buxbaum, Ph.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, Mark Daly, Ph.D., Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and their colleagues examined more than 14,000 DNA samples from affected children, parents and unrelated people. [More]
Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. [More]
TSRI scientists discover signaling pathway that contribute to Huntington's disease

TSRI scientists discover signaling pathway that contribute to Huntington's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered a major contributor to Huntington's disease, a devastating progressive neurological condition that produces involuntary movements, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment. [More]
Teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime, suggests UMass Amherst study

Teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime, suggests UMass Amherst study

Binge drinking can have lasting effects on brain pathways that are still developing during adolescence, say neuroscience researcher Heather N. Richardson and her colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Louisiana State University. [More]
Same cell type can give rise to different gliomas

Same cell type can give rise to different gliomas

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumours. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. [More]
Ugandans lack knowledge about stroke

Ugandans lack knowledge about stroke

A study published in the journal International Scholarly Research Notices Stroke found that overall knowledge about stroke in Uganda was poor, although knowing what to do for a stroke – go to the hospital – was good. [More]
CHOP, Temple University to jointly investigate new methods for eradicating HIV

CHOP, Temple University to jointly investigate new methods for eradicating HIV

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Temple University have received a joint $4.3 million, four-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to investigate new methods to eradicate HIV that lurks in brain cells despite conventional antiviral treatments. [More]
Roskamp Institute Discovers New Target For Drugs To Treat Alzheimer's Disease

Roskamp Institute Discovers New Target For Drugs To Treat Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists at the Roskamp Institute, a not-for-profit biomedical research facility specializing in Alzheimer's disease research, have isolated a key molecule that gives researchers a new drug target for the treatment of the progressive, irreversible neurological disorder. [More]
New research suggests that TEM5 protein may be a good target for cancer therapy

New research suggests that TEM5 protein may be a good target for cancer therapy

Do blood vessels that feed tumors differ from other blood vessels? Fourteen years ago, experiments designed to answer that question led to the discovery of several genes that are more active in tumor-associated blood vessels than in normal blood vessels. New research now reveals the normal function of one of those genes and suggests it could be a good target for anticancer drug therapy. [More]
Dietary cocoa flavanols can reverse age-related memory decline in healthy older adults

Dietary cocoa flavanols can reverse age-related memory decline in healthy older adults

Dietary cocoa flavanols—naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa—reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a study led by Columbia University Medical Center scientists. [More]
Researchers receive EPSRC grant to develop real-time diagnostic technique for dementia

Researchers receive EPSRC grant to develop real-time diagnostic technique for dementia

A research team from Plymouth University, together with colleagues from Swansea University, has received funding of £1M from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to develop an innovative, real-time diagnostic technique for dementia using wonder-material graphene. [More]
Engineered cells reveal changes associated with learning, memory and reward

Engineered cells reveal changes associated with learning, memory and reward

Scientists have created cells with fluorescent dyes that change color in response to specific neurochemicals. By implanting these cells into living mammalian brains, they have shown how neurochemical signaling changes as a food reward drives learning, they report in Nature Methods online October 26. [More]