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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Worldwide Business with kathy ireland conducts exclusive interview with International Cancer Center

Worldwide Business with kathy ireland conducts exclusive interview with International Cancer Center

MMP (USA) announces Worldwide Business with kathy ireland exclusive interview with International Cancer Center. Dr. Eduardo Lovo, Executive Director & Chief of the Brain Radiosurgery Unit of ICC, explains, "We make the treatment of many types of cancer affordable and accessible to many patients who have no other recourse for treatment. By using the most effective and efficient technologies and equipment, we're breaking new ground in making advanced cancer treatment affordable." [More]
Study shows wide geographic variation in use of 'clotbuster' for stroke treatment

Study shows wide geographic variation in use of 'clotbuster' for stroke treatment

It looks like a crazy quilt spread over the continent. But a new map of emergency stroke care in America shows just how much of a patchwork system we still have for delivering the most effective stroke treatment. [More]
NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research. The Avenir (meaning "future" in French) Awards support early stage investigators who propose highly innovative studies. The six scientists will each receive up to $300,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

The flu virus can be lethal. But what is often just as dangerous is the body's own reaction to the invader. This immune response consists of an inflammatory attack, meant to kill the virus. But if it gets too aggressive, this counterattack can end up harming the body's own tissues, causing damage that can lead to death. [More]
Researchers identify specific calcium channel that plays crucial role in healthy sleep

Researchers identify specific calcium channel that plays crucial role in healthy sleep

Sleep seems simple enough, a state of rest and restoration that almost every vertebrate creature must enter regularly in order to survive. But the brain responds differently to stimuli when asleep than when awake, and it is not clear what brain changes happen during sleep. [More]
UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

University of California, Riverside psychologist Chandra A. Reynolds has been awarded a $7 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study how early childhood influences versus recent influences affect cognitive and physical health by middle age. [More]
SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

In research published in Cancer Cell, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacology and physiology at Saint Louis University, has, for the first time, found a way to stop cancer cell growth by targeting the Warburg Effect, a trait of cancer cell metabolism that scientists have been eager to exploit. [More]
Brain research promises better understanding of schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders

Brain research promises better understanding of schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders

Our brain recognizes objects within milliseconds, even if it only receives rudimentary visual information. Researchers believe that reliable and fast recognition works because the brain is constantly making predictions about objects in the field of view and is comparing these with incoming information. [More]
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal supports President Obama's statement on medical use of marijuana

Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal supports President Obama's statement on medical use of marijuana

Mary Ann Liebert, publisher of the newly launched peer-reviewed open access journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, strongly supports President Obama's statement that "...carefully prescribed medical use of marijuana may in fact be appropriate and we should follow the science as opposed to ideology on this issue," when asked about a pending Senate bill seeking to change federal law regarding state-legalized medical marijuana programs. [More]
Special protein in the brain's smallest blood vessels may affect stroke risk

Special protein in the brain's smallest blood vessels may affect stroke risk

Studies on mice reveal that a special protein in the brain's tiniest blood vessels may affect the risk of stroke. Peter Carlsson, professor in genetics at the University of Gothenburg, and his research team are publishing new research findings in the journal Developmental Cell about how the blood-brain barrier develops and what makes the capillaries in the brain different from small blood vessels in other organs. [More]
Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that sticky aggregations or plaques of amyloid-beta peptides accumulate over time in the brain, triggering a series of events that ultimately result in the full-blown neurodegenerative disorder. The hypothesis has been a major driver of AD research for more than 20 years. [More]
Rats have happy dreams about tasty treats in the future

Rats have happy dreams about tasty treats in the future

When rats rest, their brains simulate journeys to a desired future such as a tasty treat, finds new UCL research funded by the Wellcome Trust and Royal Society. [More]
Innovative gene transfer-based treatment for kids with giant axonal neuropathy

Innovative gene transfer-based treatment for kids with giant axonal neuropathy

University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers have developed an innovative, experimental gene transfer-based treatment for children with giant axonal neuropathy (GAN). [More]
Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed. The research is published in the June 24, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Potential new class of drugs lessen neurodegeneration in rat model of Parkinson's disease

Potential new class of drugs lessen neurodegeneration in rat model of Parkinson's disease

The first test in a mammalian model of a potential new class of drugs to treat Parkinson's disease shows abatement of neurodegeneration in the brains of test rats and no significant toxicities, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Pfizer Inc. researchers report online in The Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
Study reveals differences in the way brain inflammation is expressed in people with Down syndrome, AD

Study reveals differences in the way brain inflammation is expressed in people with Down syndrome, AD

Researchers at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging have completed a study that revealed differences in the way brain inflammation -- considered a key component of AD-- is expressed in different subsets of patients, in particular people with Down syndrome (DS) and AD. [More]
New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Tens of millions of Americans -- an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population -- will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions), and/or stereotyped recurrent behaviors (compulsions). [More]
Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

As a tumor grows, its cancerous cells ramp up an energy-harvesting process to support its hasty development. This process, called autophagy, is normally used by a cell to recycle damaged organelles and proteins, but is also co-opted by cancer cells to meet their increased energy and metabolic demands. [More]
Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

Animal study highlights major safety concern regarding use of MRI contrast agents in patients

New results in animals highlight a major safety concern regarding a class of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents used in millions of patients each year, according to a paper published online by the journal Investigative Radiology. [More]
Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

Light may just be the answer for solving sleep problems among lung cancer patients

When you're having trouble sleeping, light is the last thing you assume you need. But according to a pilot study attempting to solve insomnia among lung cancer patients led by University at Buffalo sleep researcher Grace Dean, light may just be the answer. [More]
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