Brain News and Research RSS Feed - Brain News and Research

The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Scientists discover potential way of stopping most aggressive brain tumour

Scientists discover potential way of stopping most aggressive brain tumour

Researchers from the University of Southampton have discovered a potential way of stopping one of the most aggressive types of brain tumour from spreading, which could lead the way to better patient survival. [More]
Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

In the quest to understand the driving forces behind neurodegenerative diseases, researchers in recent years have zeroed in on clumps of malfunctioning proteins thought to kill neurons in the brain and spinal cord by jamming their cellular machinery. [More]
CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

CUMC researchers uncover new details of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

Using high-resolution electron microscopy, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have uncovered new details of the structure and function of an intracellular channel that controls the contraction of skeletal muscle. [More]
Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat, according to researchers, including a Texas A&M University professor and his former doctoral student. [More]
Color-deficiency or color-blindness?

Color-deficiency or color-blindness?

Color blindness could be considered a bit of a misleading term, because there are very few people who can't see color at all. Most people have what we call color deficiency or color confusion, which means that they're not blind to color; they just see a reduced number of colors. [More]
DCRI named coordinating center for research initiative on child health

DCRI named coordinating center for research initiative on child health

The Duke Clinical Research Institute has been named the coordinating center as part of a $157-million federal initiative involved in studying how environmental factors affect childhood health. [More]
CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

Cystinosis is a rare disease that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. [More]
NIH grant supports Wake Forest Baptist researchers to study effects of head impacts in young players

NIH grant supports Wake Forest Baptist researchers to study effects of head impacts in young players

Supported by a National Institutes of Health grant worth a projected $3.3 million over five years, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center investigators have expanded their research into the cumulative effects of head impacts in young football players to the high school level. [More]
ITESM graduates develop innovative exoskeleton that uses artificial intelligence and augmented reality

ITESM graduates develop innovative exoskeleton that uses artificial intelligence and augmented reality

Exoskeletons are mechanical structures applied externally to the body and its functions is the improve movement, hold the body of people suffering from an injury or increase physical strength to lift heavy objects. [More]
Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

The experimental drug laquinimod may prevent the development or reduce the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to research published in the September 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Immune and targeted therapies may be beneficial in patients with melanoma brain metastases

Immune and targeted therapies may be beneficial in patients with melanoma brain metastases

Brain metastases are one of the most common complications of advanced melanoma, requiring multidisciplinary management. [More]
TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Tecfidera. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious. [More]
UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

The National Institutes of Health today announced a team of researchers headed by Janice Sullivan, M.D., of the University of Louisville is among grant recipients nationwide receiving funding for a seven-year, multicenter initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes. [More]
Research re-opens door to possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage

Research re-opens door to possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage

A breakthrough in understanding how brain damage spreads - and how it could potentially be limited - has been made through a collaboration between neuroscientists and engineers at the Universities of Dundee and Strathclyde. [More]
Common genetic variant reduces neurobiological benefits of exercise in mice

Common genetic variant reduces neurobiological benefits of exercise in mice

A new study revealed that a common genetic variant in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene reduces the neurobiological benefits induced by physical exercise in mice. [More]
Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

A new study shows that when you finish your spouse's sentences or answer a fill-in-the-blank question, you're engaging the brain's relay station for memories, the hippocampus. [More]
MR Solutions receives order for cryogen-free 7T simultaneous PET-MR preclinical imaging system

MR Solutions receives order for cryogen-free 7T simultaneous PET-MR preclinical imaging system

MR Solutions has received an order for a high-powered 7T, cryogen-free, preclinical PET-MRI multi-modality imaging system from the newly formed pre-clinical imaging resource at the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI) at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Lund University stem cell researcher awarded Fernström prize for study on repairing damaged brain

Lund University stem cell researcher awarded Fernström prize for study on repairing damaged brain

Is it possible to convert a patient’s own skin cells into functioning nerve cells? Or insert healthy genes to reprogram the cells of a damaged brain? Stem cell researcher Malin Parmar at Lund University in Sweden is studying these types of issues, in close collaboration with clinical researchers. [More]
Advertisement