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The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and is a highly complex organ. Enclosed in the cranium, it has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but is over three times as large as the brain of a typical mammal with an equivalent body size.
Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities. [More]
Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. [More]
TGen to lead first-in-patient clinical trial studies to test novel drugs for glioblastoma

TGen to lead first-in-patient clinical trial studies to test novel drugs for glioblastoma

SIn 2012, The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation awarded $10 million in grants for two groundbreaking brain cancer research projects at the Translational Genomics Research Institute. One of those projects has officially received the final regulatory approval from University of California, San Francisco, which means patient enrollment for the trial can begin. [More]
Stereotactic radiosurgery feasible for multiple brain metastases

Stereotactic radiosurgery feasible for multiple brain metastases

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a feasible treatment option for cancer patients with up to 10 brain metastases, Japanese researchers report in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
Aberrant reward processing likely to precede bipolar symptom onset

Aberrant reward processing likely to precede bipolar symptom onset

Healthy children who have a parent with bipolar disorder show altered brain activation during reward processing, research shows. [More]
HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]
Non-invasive functional neuroimaging tools help characterize how brain activity disrupted in dyslexia

Non-invasive functional neuroimaging tools help characterize how brain activity disrupted in dyslexia

A new study in Biological Psychiatry maps the circuitry of dyslexia. Dyslexia, the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the United States, is a neurological reading disability that occurs when the regions of the brain that process written language don't function normally. [More]
Merz Pharmaceuticals launches new CAIDE Dementia Risk App

Merz Pharmaceuticals launches new CAIDE Dementia Risk App

The CAIDE Dementia Risk App from Merz Pharmaceuticals is available free of charge for people from 40 to 65 to calculate their individual risk for getting dementia within the next two decades. Using a traffic light color scheme, the App can also help physicians discuss preventive measures with patients at risk. [More]
Findings could lead to improved treatments for stroke, other brain injuries

Findings could lead to improved treatments for stroke, other brain injuries

Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to ability that we already possess. For example, a trained pianist might learn a new melody more easily than learning how to hit a tennis serve. [More]
Obama vows better health care, other initiatives, for vets, military

Obama vows better health care, other initiatives, for vets, military

Addressing the American Legion's national convention, the president announced steps to expand access to mental health care and an initiative to lower home loan costs for military families. He also promised a new "culture of accountability' at the Department of Veterans Affairs. [More]
Scientists solve mystery of why specific signaling pathway can be linked with alcohol dependence

Scientists solve mystery of why specific signaling pathway can be linked with alcohol dependence

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. [More]
Scientists alter emotional associations of specific memories

Scientists alter emotional associations of specific memories

By manipulating neural circuits in the brain of mice, scientists have altered the emotional associations of specific memories. [More]
Young adults who experienced depression have hyper-connected networks in the brain

Young adults who experienced depression have hyper-connected networks in the brain

Depression may be better predicted and understood now that University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered that young adults who previously experienced the mental illness have hyper-connected emotional and cognitive networks in the brain. [More]
New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. [More]
New evidence puts into doubt the long-held depression belief

New evidence puts into doubt the long-held depression belief

New evidence puts into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin - a chemical messenger in the brain - plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains (and thus should have been "depressed" by conventional wisdom) did not show depression-like symptoms. [More]
THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. [More]
Brain's motor cortex can directly turn down hearing

Brain's motor cortex can directly turn down hearing

When we want to listen carefully to someone, the first thing we do is stop talking. The second thing we do is stop moving altogether. This strategy helps us hear better by preventing unwanted sounds generated by our own movements. [More]
UW researchers develop smartphone app that detects newborn jaundice within minutes

UW researchers develop smartphone app that detects newborn jaundice within minutes

University of Washington engineers and physicians have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns and can deliver results to parents and pediatricians within minutes. It could serve as a screening tool to determine whether a baby needs a blood test - the gold standard for detecting high levels of bilirubin. [More]
Study provides neural explanation for why some skills are easier to learn than others

Study provides neural explanation for why some skills are easier to learn than others

Learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns, a study of monkeys has found. The scientists explored the brain's capacity to learn through recordings of electrical activity of brain cell networks. [More]
Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. [More]