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There are two main types of brain cancer. Primary brain cancer starts in the brain. Metastatic brain cancer starts somewhere else in the body and moves to the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Also called glioma, meningioma.
New study uncovers way to characterize black box of malignant melanoma

New study uncovers way to characterize black box of malignant melanoma

When malignant melanoma metastasizes to the brain, it is a death sentence for most patients. Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of the skin cancers and the mechanisms that govern early metastatic growth and interactions of metastatic cells with the brain microenvironment remain shrouded in mystery. [More]
UCLA researchers develop new combination therapy to activate immune response against glioblastoma

UCLA researchers develop new combination therapy to activate immune response against glioblastoma

UCLA researchers have developed a new breakthrough combination treatment that utilizes a vaccine to activate an immune response against advanced brain tumors. [More]
Combined therapy approach could prove promising to treat brain cancer

Combined therapy approach could prove promising to treat brain cancer

A "combined therapy" approach to treating the most common form of brain cancer could prove promising, scientists say. [More]
Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden will host a Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C. at the White House. Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will attend. [More]
Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

A Yale-led study describes how a known cancer gene, EGFR, silences genes that typically suppress tumors. The finding, published in Cell Reports, may lead to the development of more effective, individualized treatment for patients with lung cancer and other cancer types. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
New nano-fabricated platform provides accurate post-surgery prognosis for glioblastoma patients

New nano-fabricated platform provides accurate post-surgery prognosis for glioblastoma patients

A new nano-fabricated platform for observing brain cancer cells provides a much more detailed look at how the cells migrate and a more accurate post-surgery prognosis for brain cancer (glioblastoma) patients. [More]
Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

A new study suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma (GB), the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop lab test that accurately predicts glioblastoma aggression and spread

Johns Hopkins researchers develop lab test that accurately predicts glioblastoma aggression and spread

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed an experimental laboratory test that accurately clocks the “speed” of human brain tumor cell movement along a small glass “track.” [More]
Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Physician-assisted death was supported by a majority of California and Hawaii residents, regardless of their ethnicity, who responded to an online survey, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Giving chemotherapy after radiotherapy delays rare brain tumour growth

Giving chemotherapy after radiotherapy delays rare brain tumour growth

GIVING chemotherapy after radiotherapy delays further growth of a rare type of brain tumour, increasing the number of patients alive at five years from 44 per cent to 56 per cent. [More]
Retroviral replicating vector can extend lives of brain cancer patients

Retroviral replicating vector can extend lives of brain cancer patients

Doctors at UCLA, Cleveland Clinic, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and additional institutions have achieved a milestone in the development of a treatment for people with recurrent glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, by successfully demonstrating a modified virus that can extend the lives of patients with the disease. [More]
Clinical trial to test safety, efficacy of Roswell Park-developed SurVaxM in multiple myeloma patients

Clinical trial to test safety, efficacy of Roswell Park-developed SurVaxM in multiple myeloma patients

An immune-based therapy developed at Roswell Park Cancer Institute is moving forward with its third clinical trial. The early-stage clinical trial will assess whether SurVaxM — a cancer vaccine developed at Roswell Park — is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with multiple myeloma, a rare type of blood cancer. [More]
Advanced cancer patients lack palliative, hospice care

Advanced cancer patients lack palliative, hospice care

Medical societies, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life. Yet major gaps persist between these recommendations and real-life practice, a new study shows. [More]
Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Researchers have identified a group of immune system genes that may play a role in how long people can live after developing a common type of brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme, a tumor of the glial cells in the brain. [More]
Clinical trials of anti-cancer agent PAC-1 continue to progress with anonymous funding

Clinical trials of anti-cancer agent PAC-1 continue to progress with anonymous funding

Clinical trials of the anti-cancer agent PAC-1 are continuing to expand, thanks to a $7 million angel investment from an anonymous contributor who originally invested $4 million to help get the compound this far in the drug-approval pipeline. [More]
Flavopiridol drug could be effective strategy to impair brain cancer growth

Flavopiridol drug could be effective strategy to impair brain cancer growth

Glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer is a deadly disease for which at present there is no cure. Now, researchers have published research results that show how repurposing the old drug flavopiridol could be an effective strategy to cut short sugar availability and impair cancer growth. [More]
Understanding antibody transport mechanisms in the brain

Understanding antibody transport mechanisms in the brain

Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as stroke, brain cancer, and Alzheimer's disease, are a serious threat affecting over 50 million Americans with an associated cost of over $750 billion per year, which is expected to grow significantly over the coming decades. [More]
Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

A new study shows that repeated radiation therapy used to target tumors in the brain may not be as safe to healthy brain cells as previously assumed. [More]
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