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Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
WSU scientists suggest that glyphosate not present in human breast milk

WSU scientists suggest that glyphosate not present in human breast milk

Washington State University scientists have found that glyphosate, the main ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, does not accumulate in mother's breast milk. [More]
PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

Breastfeeding has become more common all across the world in recent years, however, breastfeeding rate has remained low in Hong Kong. One of the main reasons is that Hong Kong mothers worry about the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk to meet the growing needs of the infant. [More]
Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Traditionally, babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are temporarily identified by gender and last name, such as Babyboy Jackson or Babygirl Smith, but this naming configuration can result in wrong-patient errors for the fragile newborns. [More]
Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring's brains starting before pregnancy. [More]
Vitamin K-deficient bleeding increasingly common in newborns

Vitamin K-deficient bleeding increasingly common in newborns

Vitamin K, which has been administered to newborns as an injection since it was first recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 1961, is vital for blood to clot normally. Despite it being given as standard medical practice since then, vitamin K-deficient bleeding (VKDB) is being seen more often in newborns than it has in decades. [More]
Human breast milk bought online poses serious health risks

Human breast milk bought online poses serious health risks

The recent craze for human breast milk, which has become a lucrative online market, poses serious health risks, according to British experts. [More]
Breastfeeding Medicine editorial examines risks associated with Internet-purchased breast milk

Breastfeeding Medicine editorial examines risks associated with Internet-purchased breast milk

The practice of breast milk sharing among mothers has evolved into an Internet-based marketplace in which this valuable commodity is being bought and sold not only to feed babies, but as a "natural superfood" for body builders and athletes. [More]
Mutations in ZnT2 protein reduce amounts of zinc levels in mother's milk

Mutations in ZnT2 protein reduce amounts of zinc levels in mother's milk

Zinc plays an important role in a woman's ability to successfully breast-feed her child, according to health researchers. [More]
Purdue University-led analysis finds that carotenoid levels in breast milk differ by country, dietary habits

Purdue University-led analysis finds that carotenoid levels in breast milk differ by country, dietary habits

A Purdue University-led analysis of breast milk concludes that levels of health-promoting compounds known as carotenoids differ by country, with the U.S. lagging behind China and Mexico, a reflection of regional dietary habits. [More]
Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

On Friday, May 22, an 18-member team of physicians and nurses from Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led an international collaboration to separate a pair of six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins, the first such operation ever performed on Haitian soil. [More]
WHO's updated essential medicines list includes progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring

WHO's updated essential medicines list includes progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring

The World Health Organization released its 2015 updated essential medicines list and for the first time included the progesterone contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR), a contraceptive safe and effective for lactating women in the postpartum period. [More]
ASCO 2015: Novartis presents data on Zykadia and Tafinlar studies for non-small cell lung cancer

ASCO 2015: Novartis presents data on Zykadia and Tafinlar studies for non-small cell lung cancer

Novartis today announced new data from two Phase II studies of Zykadia (ceritinib), as well as one Phase II study of TafinlarĀ® (dabrafenib) in combination with Mekinist (trametinib) in certain patients with non-small cell lung cancer. [More]
Upsher-Smith announces FDA approval of sNDA for Qudexy XR extended-release capsules

Upsher-Smith announces FDA approval of sNDA for Qudexy XR extended-release capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. announced that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules for use as initial monotherapy in patients two years of age and older who are experiencing partial-onset seizures (POS) or primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Public health advisories reduce rate of codeine dispensed to postpartum women

Public health advisories reduce rate of codeine dispensed to postpartum women

Public health advisories from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada were associated with significant reductions in the rate of dispensing of codeine to postpartum women, according to a study in the May 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital attains Baby-Friendly designation

Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital attains Baby-Friendly designation

Baby-Friendly USA announced this week that Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has received prestigious international recognition as a Baby-Friendly designated birth facility. A hospital can only be deemed "Baby-Friendly" after the completion of a rigorous onsite assessment survey and a final review of the External Review Board. [More]
Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that while a large majority of newborns are exposed in their earliest days to bisphenol A (BPA), a much-studied chemical used in plastics and in food and soda can linings, they can chemically alter and rid their bodies of it. [More]
Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

The immune-boosting properties of breast milk have long been known. Now a team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins pediatric surgeon-in-chief David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., says experiments in mice reveal how breast milk works to ward off the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disorder that affects 12 percent of premature babies and claims the lives of one in four of those who have it. [More]
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