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Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Public health advisories reduce rate of codeine dispensed to postpartum women

Public health advisories reduce rate of codeine dispensed to postpartum women

Public health advisories from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Health Canada were associated with significant reductions in the rate of dispensing of codeine to postpartum women, according to a study in the May 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital attains Baby-Friendly designation

Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital attains Baby-Friendly designation

Baby-Friendly USA announced this week that Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has received prestigious international recognition as a Baby-Friendly designated birth facility. A hospital can only be deemed "Baby-Friendly" after the completion of a rigorous onsite assessment survey and a final review of the External Review Board. [More]
Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that while a large majority of newborns are exposed in their earliest days to bisphenol A (BPA), a much-studied chemical used in plastics and in food and soda can linings, they can chemically alter and rid their bodies of it. [More]
Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

The immune-boosting properties of breast milk have long been known. Now a team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins pediatric surgeon-in-chief David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., says experiments in mice reveal how breast milk works to ward off the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disorder that affects 12 percent of premature babies and claims the lives of one in four of those who have it. [More]
Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. presented data from a 52-week, open-label extension study (PREVAIL OLE) showing that Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules offered a long-term adjunctive treatment option with a favorable tolerability profile for a high proportion of patients with refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). [More]
Lack of fish oil fatty acids can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life

Lack of fish oil fatty acids can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life

While recent reports question whether fish oil supplements support heart health, UC Irvine scientists have found that the fatty acids they contain are vitally important to the developing brain. [More]
Breastfeeding not a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity, research shows

Breastfeeding not a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity, research shows

Biologic research does not support breastfeeding as a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity. Yes, while breastfeeding is the optimal first food for a baby, it's not as simple to say that it will protect all children from becoming obese. [More]
Breastfeeding is not a frontline strategy to prevent obesity, say researchers

Breastfeeding is not a frontline strategy to prevent obesity, say researchers

A new study supports human milk as the optimal first food for babies, but the study raises questions about whether breast milk protects children from becoming obese. [More]
Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

A study published today on the safety of human breast milk bought over the Internet found that 10 percent of samples contained added cow's milk. The discovery that purchased samples of human milk may be purposely "topped off" with cow's milk or infant formula confirms a danger for the large number of babies receiving the purchased milk due to medical conditions. [More]
Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire plc today announced that Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection is now available in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Natpara as an adjunct to calcium and vitamin D to control hypocalcemia in patients with hypoparathyroidism on January 23, 2015. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
Milk protein comparison study may help improve infant formula

Milk protein comparison study may help improve infant formula

Human babies appear to need more of a nutritional boost from breast-milk proteins than do infants of one of their closest primate relatives, suggests a study comparing human milk with the milk of rhesus macaque monkeys. [More]
Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with increased intelligence

Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with increased intelligence

Longer duration of breastfeeding is linked with increased intelligence in adulthood, longer schooling, and higher adult earnings, a study following a group of almost 3,500 newborns for 30 years published in The Lancet Global Health journal has found. [More]
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Human milk provides the best nutrition for most babies and breastfeeding provides the best nutrition for infants and very young children, according to an updated position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Two persistent organic environmental pollutants affect infant growth

Two persistent organic environmental pollutants affect infant growth

Even though the levels of two environmental pollutants have declined over the last 20 years, they may still have adverse effects on children's development, according to a new study by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. This is the largest study of environmental pollutants and infant growth to date. [More]
Common flame retardants linked to obesity, say UH researchers

Common flame retardants linked to obesity, say UH researchers

Could your electronics be making you fat? According to University of Houston researchers, a common flame retardant used to keep electronics from overheating may be to blame. [More]

Formula-fed infants have higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants

In the first U.S. study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
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