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Toddlers more exposed to brominated flame retardants than their mothers

Toddlers more exposed to brominated flame retardants than their mothers

Toddlers are more exposed to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) at home than their mothers, shows a new doctoral thesis from Stockholm University. [More]
Orexo announces positive results from ISTART/006 study

Orexo announces positive results from ISTART/006 study

Orexo US, Inc. announced results from the ISTART/006 study, being presented today at the 25th Annual Meeting and Symposium of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry in Aventura, Florida, USA. [More]
Researchers assess efficiency and safety of breast milk stimulant

Researchers assess efficiency and safety of breast milk stimulant

Most women can make all the milk their baby needs, but some mothers turn to medications to help increase their supply. While some specialists encourage the off-label use of domperidone to stimulate breast milk production, some studies have suggested it may be related to negative side effects, including irregular heartbeat and sudden cardiac death. [More]
Increasing length of breastfeeding could save over £40 million annually for NHS

Increasing length of breastfeeding could save over £40 million annually for NHS

The NHS could save more than £40 million a year by increasing the length of time that mothers breastfeed, according to research carried out at Brunel University London. [More]
New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

Using weights obtained from over 100,000 Northern California babies, a new study is the first to detail the weight loss patterns of exclusively breastfed newborns. The results show that some breastfed babies lose weight faster and for a longer period than was previously recognized. [More]
Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Common antimicrobial in household items causes liver fibrosis, cancer in mice

Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical. [More]
New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

New NIH-funded study aims to find novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children

Penn State College of Medicine and University of Wisconsin have been awarded a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund the study of a novel way to treat iron deficiency anemia in children. Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States. [More]
New research shows link between perinatal exposure to BPA and risk of food intolerance in later life

New research shows link between perinatal exposure to BPA and risk of food intolerance in later life

If it seems like more people are allergic to, or intolerant of, more and different kinds of foods than ever before, there might be a reason why. A new research published in November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists show, for the first time, that there is a link between perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) at low doses and the risk to develop food intolerance in later life. [More]
Researchers awarded grant to develop non-invasive device to detect Human Cytomegalovirus

Researchers awarded grant to develop non-invasive device to detect Human Cytomegalovirus

Researchers from Cardiff and Swansea Universities have been awarded a grant of more than £323k to develop a new, non-invasive, low-cost, and easy to use point of care device to diagnose Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV). [More]
SSEF protocol reduces incidence of NEC or death in infants with extremely low birth weight

SSEF protocol reduces incidence of NEC or death in infants with extremely low birth weight

A standardized slow enteral feeding (SSEF) protocol significantly reduces the incidence of necrotizing enterocoltis (NEC), or death of intestinal tissue, and death in infants with extremely low birth weight, according to a new study. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
Study finds that skin exposure may trigger early peanut allergy in children

Study finds that skin exposure may trigger early peanut allergy in children

Many children may become allergic to peanuts before they first eat them, and skin exposure may be contribute to early sensitization, according to a study in mice led by Mount Sinai researchers and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Food allergies in inner-city children: an interview with Dr. Robert Wood

Food allergies in inner-city children: an interview with Dr. Robert Wood

The general interest is in trying to better define the true prevalence of food allergy; not just how common it is, but whether it's becoming more common over time. [More]
Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a new study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. [More]
Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Now, women experiencing morning sickness can benefit from Diclegis drug

Up to 85 percent of pregnant women are affected by nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP), more commonly known as morning sickness. [More]
Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Studies Suggest that ErbB4 Receptor Activation May Be a Novel Therapeutic Avenue for Intestinal Diseases Involving Epithelial Cell Death, According to Research Published in The American Journal of Pathology [More]
Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Premature infants are at increased risk for a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease called necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. [More]
Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Infant rhesus monkeys receiving different diets early in life develop distinct immune systems that persist months after weaning, a study by researchers from UC Davis, the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have shown. [More]
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets now available in U.S. for people with diabetes

Jardiance (empagliflozin) tablets are now available by prescription in pharmacies across the United States, including Walgreens, Rite Aid, Kroger and many other leading chain and independent retailers, according to Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company. [More]