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Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. [More]
Pregnant women with bipolar disorder at higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis

Pregnant women with bipolar disorder at higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis

Pregnant women with bipolar disorder and their families and physicians should be aware of a significantly higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis, according to a new Northwestern Medicine review of literature on the rare and under-researched disorder. [More]
BetterYou’s oral vitamin D sprays win gold and bronze at Best Baby and Toddler Gear Awards by Mummii

BetterYou’s oral vitamin D sprays win gold and bronze at Best Baby and Toddler Gear Awards by Mummii

An innovative way of boosting the vitamin D levels of expectant mums and infants has been honoured by one of the parenting industries most prestigious award schemes. [More]
Exposure to antibiotics in early life linked to increased food allergy risk

Exposure to antibiotics in early life linked to increased food allergy risk

Antibiotic treatment within the first year of life may wipe out more than an unwanted infection: exposure to the drugs is associated with an increase in food allergy diagnosis, new research from the University of South Carolina suggests. [More]
Breastfeeding for longer than 6 months can lower breast cancer mortality risk

Breastfeeding for longer than 6 months can lower breast cancer mortality risk

A new study of women 20 years after undergoing surgery for primary breast cancer shows that breastfeeding for longer than 6 months is associated with a better survival rate. [More]
Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

International tourism exceeds 1.2 billion persons each year, with more than 20 percent of travelers reporting some type of illness. [More]
Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe

LifeVest, a technology being developed at St. Michael's Hospital to help newborns breathe, won the Global Healthcare Innovation Academy's international competition in Calgary. [More]
Giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

Giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements could benefit infants

New research from New Zealand's University of Otago has found that giving breastfeeding mothers monthly high-dose vitamin D supplements may be a possible way to improve their babies' vitamin D status. [More]
New article highlights positive impact of the BFHI on breastfeeding outcomes

New article highlights positive impact of the BFHI on breastfeeding outcomes

The 10-step Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, aimed at promoting breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity to improve early infant health in the U.S. is having a positive impact on some measures, but others have proven more challenging to influence or assess. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. [More]
Study finds positive link between planned home births and breast feeding

Study finds positive link between planned home births and breast feeding

A new study by academics in Trinity College Dublin has found that there is a strong positive relationship between planned birth at home and breast feeding: breastfeeding was twice as likely after planned home births compared to hospital births. [More]
New drug prevents vaginal and oral transmission of HIV in pre-clinical animal models

New drug prevents vaginal and oral transmission of HIV in pre-clinical animal models

HIV remains a major health concern for women and children globally. Worldwide, the majority of new HIV infections occur in young women. Each year, 1.5 million women living with HIV become pregnant. [More]
PolyU researchers discover inadequate intakes of micronutrients among Hong Kong lactating women

PolyU researchers discover inadequate intakes of micronutrients among Hong Kong lactating women

While breastfeeding has become more common across the globe in recent years, lactating women may not be aware of the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk and how their daily diet affects their nutrition intakes. [More]
University of Southampton hosts two virtual workshops to address Breastfeeding Dilemma

University of Southampton hosts two virtual workshops to address Breastfeeding Dilemma

How do we support and encourage breastfeeding, without subjecting those who are unable, or choose not to, breastfeed to shame and guilt? [More]
Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

Pre-term infants fed with breast milk have better IQs, working memory and motor function, study shows

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function. [More]
Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

A study led by researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles suggests that maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of their HIV-uninfected infants. [More]
Breastfeeding leads to long-term metabolic changes in mothers, study shows

Breastfeeding leads to long-term metabolic changes in mothers, study shows

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München has studied the metabolism of women with gestational diabetes after giving birth. [More]
Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding

Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding

For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India. [More]
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