Breastfeeding News and Research RSS Feed - Breastfeeding News and Research

Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer Inc. announced today top-line results from two pivotal Phase 3 trials from the Oral treatment Psoriasis Trials (OPT) Program, OPT Pivotal #1 (A3921078) and OPT Pivotal #2 (A3921079), evaluating the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, the first in a new class of medicines being investigated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Pediatric viral respiratory tract infection often complicated by bacterial sinusitis

Pediatric viral respiratory tract infection often complicated by bacterial sinusitis

Nearly 1 in 10 cases of viral upper respiratory tract infections in infants and young children is complicated by acute bacterial sinusitis, often in conjunction with acute otitis media, a longitudinal cohort study has found. [More]
Researchers figure out role of birth weight and breastfeeding in long run health outcomes

Researchers figure out role of birth weight and breastfeeding in long run health outcomes

Lower weight babies and babies who aren't breastfed or not breastfed for long are at greater risk of developing chronic inflammation and related health problems later in life, according to a new study. [More]
Women on antidepressant medication are more successful at breastfeeding

Women on antidepressant medication are more successful at breastfeeding

University of Adelaide researchers have found that women on antidepressant medication are more successful at breastfeeding their babies if they keep taking the medication, compared with women who quit antidepressants because of concerns about their babies' health. [More]

Study shows female drinkers face greater risks to health compared with male drinkers

The increased risk of death associated with alcohol intake is not the same for men and women. A study that compared the amount of alcohol consumed and death from all causes among nearly 2.5 million women and men showed that the differences between the sexes became greater as alcohol intake increased, as described in an article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Brown University researchers awarded USAID grant to test community-based breastfeeding support initiative

Brown University researchers awarded USAID grant to test community-based breastfeeding support initiative

Kenya's government has made significant progress recently in developing programs to promote breastfeeding among mothers who deliver at the hospital but about 60 percent of the nation's babies are born outside a health care facility. [More]

Study aims at increasing vegetable consumption among kids

As part of the European project HabEat (2010-2014), coordinated by INRA and involving 10 scientific partners, researchers have made a step forward in the understanding of how eating behaviours and preferences form in early life. On March 31st and April 1st in Dijon (France), a symposium presents the results and recommendations for early childhood professionals and parents. [More]
Breast lift procedures growing at twice the rate of breast implant surgeries

Breast lift procedures growing at twice the rate of breast implant surgeries

New statistics released today by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons show that breast lift procedures are growing at twice the rate of breast implant surgeries. Since 2000, breast lifts have grown by 70 percent, outpacing implants two-to-one. Breast implants are still by far the most performed cosmetic surgery in women, but lifts are steadily gaining. In 2013, more than 90,000 breast lift procedures were performed by ASPS member surgeons. [More]

Medolac Laboratories opens new center of operations in Lake Oswego, Oregon

Many local and state dignitaries, investors, employees, donors and media, participated in the ribbon cutting ceremony on Thursday, March 27, 2014 to help christen Medolac Laboratories' flagship center of operations in Lake Oswego, Oregon. [More]

Toxicologists reveal new methods for estimating infants' exposure to POPs

Toxicologists are revealing new methods and models for estimating infants' exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) today at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) 53rd Annual Meeting and ToxExpo in Phoenix, Ariz. [More]
Breastfeeding increases prevalence of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in infants

Breastfeeding increases prevalence of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in infants

Breastfeeding until at least nine months of age increases prevalence in the gastrointestinal tract of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria, species which are known to contribute to development of a healthy immune system, according to a paper describing the establishment of the intestinal microbiota during the first three years of life. [More]
FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

FDA approves Xolair for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xolair (omalizumab) for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria, a form of chronic hives. [More]
New curricula is essential to train internists to manage menopausal symptoms

New curricula is essential to train internists to manage menopausal symptoms

The number of menopausal women is projected to reach 50 million by 2020. With changing views on appropriate therapies to control symptoms and new treatments available and on the horizon, most internists lack the core competencies and experience to meet the needs of women entering menopause, according to a provocative Commentary published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Infant feeding and activity behaviors believed to increase child's risk for obesity later in life

Infant feeding and activity behaviors believed to increase child's risk for obesity later in life

Most of the parents included in a new study reported some infant feeding and activity behaviors that are believed to increase a child's risk for obesity later in life. [More]

Orexo signs multi-year agreement with OptumRx and UnitedHealth Group

Orexo AB, the manufacturer of ZUBSOLV® (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual tablets (CIII), announced a multi-year agreement with UnitedHealth Group® and OptumRx® providing preferred coverage and reimbursement of ZUBSOLV®. [More]
Bayer and Onyx announce Phase 3 trial evaluating use of NEXAVAR for patients with HCC after local ablation

Bayer and Onyx announce Phase 3 trial evaluating use of NEXAVAR for patients with HCC after local ablation

Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., an Amgen subsidiary (Nasdaq: AMGN), today announced that a Phase 3 trial evaluating the investigational use of NEXAVAR® (sorafenib) tablets as an adjuvant treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer, who had no detectable disease after surgical resection or local ablation, did not meet its primary endpoint of improving recurrence-free survival. [More]
Washington Hospital recognized as 'Baby-Friendly Hospital'

Washington Hospital recognized as 'Baby-Friendly Hospital'

Washington Hospital has earned the distinction as a "Baby-Friendly Hospital" from the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, a global program launched by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund. The designation recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding. Fewer than 175 hospitals in the U.S. are "Baby-Friendly." [More]

Poll: Just 12% of parents without coverage take breastfeeding support classes

Just 12 percent of parents without insurance coverage take breastfeeding support classes that can offer crucial support and encourage new moms to breastfeed, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. [More]
Researchers examine how breastfed children perform better in school

Researchers examine how breastfed children perform better in school

Loads of studies over the years have shown that children who were breastfed score higher on IQ tests and perform better in school, but the reason why remained unclear. [More]

Pregnant women with bipolar disorder more frequently have mental health

Pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder more frequently have significant mental health and early mothering challenges than other perinatal women undergoing psychiatric treatment, according to a study in the Journal of Affective Disorders. [More]