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Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Exposure to pathogens early in life is beneficial to the education and development of the human immune system. [More]
Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

African American women with ovarian cancer are more likely to die from the disease than are White women and they are also much more likely to be obese. These factors may be linked by the new finding that excess abdominal fat in overweight and obese women could interfere with the detection of early symptoms of ovarian cancer, as presented in a study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Widowed women have lower frailty risk than married women, study finds

Widowed women have lower frailty risk than married women, study finds

The well-accepted association between marital status, health, and risk of functional impairment in older individuals is generally true, but a new study on frailty found unexpected, gender-specific differences. [More]
One in 10 people in UK believed to be vitamin B12 deficient

One in 10 people in UK believed to be vitamin B12 deficient

One in 10 people in the UK are believed to be deficient in vitamin B12 – that’s an astonishing six million people suffering from the consequences of having less than the optimum amount of B12 in their system. [More]
New study links additional paid maternity leave to lower infant mortality rate

New study links additional paid maternity leave to lower infant mortality rate

For each additional month of paid maternity leave offered in low- and middle-income countries, infant mortality is reduced by 13%, according to a new study by researchers from McGill University and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. [More]
Higher rates of breastfeeding, vaccination use cut ear infection in babies

Higher rates of breastfeeding, vaccination use cut ear infection in babies

In what would be considered good news for many parents a new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston finds the rates of ear infections during a baby's first year have declined; the investigators suggested that higher rates of breastfeeding, use of vaccinations and lower rates of smoking may be the major contributors. The study was recently published in Pediatrics. [More]
Study examines depressed mother's oxytocin levels and mother-child emotional bonding

Study examines depressed mother's oxytocin levels and mother-child emotional bonding

Widely referred to as the "love" hormone, oxytocin is an indispensable part of childbirth and emotional mother-child bonding. Psychologists at Florida Atlantic University are conducting a novel study to determine how a mother's levels of oxytocin might be different in women with depression. [More]
Antibodies given within one day of SHIV exposure can clear the virus

Antibodies given within one day of SHIV exposure can clear the virus

Scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center today revealed that infant rhesus macaques treated with antibodies within 24 hours of being exposed to SHIV, a chimeric simian virus that bears the HIV envelope protein, were completely cleared of the virus. [More]
Promoting breastfeeding as 'natural' way could result in harmful decision-making, experts warn

Promoting breastfeeding as 'natural' way could result in harmful decision-making, experts warn

Breastfeeding campaigns that extol breastfeeding as the "natural" way to feed infants could result in harmful decision-making by some parents on other important health matters, according to experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Many women have short length of stay after childbirth, new study finds

Many women have short length of stay after childbirth, new study finds

A substantial proportion of women in countries around the world do not stay in health facilities for long enough after giving birth, which could result in them receiving inadequate postnatal care, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Conducive work climate can help moms to continue breastfeeding

Conducive work climate can help moms to continue breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is healthy for baby and for Mom. It has a positive impact on childhood obesity, infections and allergies, is linked to a lower likelihood of mothers getting ovarian or breast cancers later in life and to a more positive maternal-child relationship. [More]
Victims of sexual abuse stop breastfeeding early, study finds

Victims of sexual abuse stop breastfeeding early, study finds

More than two out of ten women who have been victims of sexual abuse as children are likely to stop breastfeeding before their babies reach four months, according to a new study. [More]
Breastfeeding essential for first six months of newborns' life

Breastfeeding essential for first six months of newborns' life

Newborns should be breastfed exclusively for the first six months of life with continued breastfeeding until at least 12 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. This can be hard when new breastfeeding families have to rely on child care facilities because of a need to return to work in a specified time. What kind of breastfeeding support, if any, can they rely on from the child care facility? This question interested a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing [More]
Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

A potential correlation between pre-labor cesarean delivery (PLCD) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could offer new targets for cancer prevention research, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. [More]
New approach to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV

New approach to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV

The first findings from a study in the Kingdom of Swaziland on a new approach to reduce mother to child transmission of HIV were presented at the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) in Boston. [More]
Single dose of zoledronic acid can inhibit bone loss in HIV-infected patients

Single dose of zoledronic acid can inhibit bone loss in HIV-infected patients

A single dose of the drug zoledronic acid was found to inhibit the bone loss that is common in HIV-infected patients and that is increased during the first two years of treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART). [More]
BetterYou urges importance of vitamin D for children as new research links breastfed youngsters to deficiency

BetterYou urges importance of vitamin D for children as new research links breastfed youngsters to deficiency

Fresh research linking breastfed youngsters to vitamin D deficiency has again prompted health pioneers BetterYou to urge the importance of vitamin D supplementation for children. [More]
Understanding risk factors that contribute to childhood obesity

Understanding risk factors that contribute to childhood obesity

As the rate of obesity in the U.S. population has risen dramatically, more and more children are becoming overweight at younger and younger ages. Understanding the factors that contribute to childhood obesity and identifying ways to prevent its development are critical to stemming the historically high prevalence of childhood obesity and of associated health problems like type 2 diabetes. [More]
Organic meat and milk contain more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventional

Organic meat and milk contain more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventional

In the largest study of its kind, an international team of experts led by Newcastle University, UK, has shown that both organic milk and meat contain around 50% more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally produced products. [More]
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