Breastfeeding News and Research RSS Feed - Breastfeeding News and Research

Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

While a large number of women quit or reduce smoking upon pregnancy recognition, many resume smoking postpartum. Previous research has estimated that approximately 70% of women who quit smoking during pregnancy relapse within the first year after childbirth, and of those who relapse, 67% resume smoking by three months, and up to 90% by six months. [More]
Study focuses on how women experience sex after childbirth

Study focuses on how women experience sex after childbirth

New mothers in the Philippines spend more time in the bedroom with their partner in the first few weeks after giving birth than they did before they became pregnant. [More]
Breastfeeding not a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity, research shows

Breastfeeding not a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity, research shows

Biologic research does not support breastfeeding as a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity. Yes, while breastfeeding is the optimal first food for a baby, it's not as simple to say that it will protect all children from becoming obese. [More]
Breastfeeding is not a frontline strategy to prevent obesity, say researchers

Breastfeeding is not a frontline strategy to prevent obesity, say researchers

A new study supports human milk as the optimal first food for babies, but the study raises questions about whether breast milk protects children from becoming obese. [More]
Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

A study published today on the safety of human breast milk bought over the Internet found that 10 percent of samples contained added cow's milk. The discovery that purchased samples of human milk may be purposely "topped off" with cow's milk or infant formula confirms a danger for the large number of babies receiving the purchased milk due to medical conditions. [More]
Asian leaders gather in Vietnam to discuss role of parliamentarians in child health, nutrition

Asian leaders gather in Vietnam to discuss role of parliamentarians in child health, nutrition

Leaders and parliamentarians from Asian countries will gather today to recognize the vital role of parliamentarian leaders in advancing child nutrition and development. [More]
Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire plc today announced that Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection is now available in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Natpara as an adjunct to calcium and vitamin D to control hypocalcemia in patients with hypoparathyroidism on January 23, 2015. [More]
Uganda Newborn Study explores ways to improve child mortality rates

Uganda Newborn Study explores ways to improve child mortality rates

In Uganda, child mortality rates are improving, but progress is slower for deaths occurring in the first four weeks of life, or the newborn period, and for stillbirths. But recent evidence from local researchers show that a cost-effective package of care linking families, government-mandated village health teams (a form of community health workers), and health facilities can improve life-saving practices during pregnancy, childbirth and in the first weeks of life; and benefit poorest families the most. [More]
Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

The proposed link between caffeine and reductions in the beta amyloid plaque accumulation characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest a possible role for caffeine in AD treatment. The latest evidence linking beta amyloid protein to Alzheimer's disease and exploring the relationship between caffeine and beta amyloid are featured in a review article in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with increased intelligence

Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with increased intelligence

Longer duration of breastfeeding is linked with increased intelligence in adulthood, longer schooling, and higher adult earnings, a study following a group of almost 3,500 newborns for 30 years published in The Lancet Global Health journal has found. [More]
CHOP researchers find link between infancy BMI and childhood obesity

CHOP researchers find link between infancy BMI and childhood obesity

Body mass index (BMI) during infancy may help to predict if a child will be obese by age four. In a study focused on the infant BMI-childhood obesity relationship in a cohort with a majority of African-American children, researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia say that a better understanding of infant growth patterns may lead to more effective early efforts at obesity prevention. [More]
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics highlights positive effects of human milk on infants, maternal health

Human milk provides the best nutrition for most babies and breastfeeding provides the best nutrition for infants and very young children, according to an updated position paper from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Two persistent organic environmental pollutants affect infant growth

Two persistent organic environmental pollutants affect infant growth

Even though the levels of two environmental pollutants have declined over the last 20 years, they may still have adverse effects on children's development, according to a new study by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. This is the largest study of environmental pollutants and infant growth to date. [More]

Formula-fed infants have higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants

In the first U.S. study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations. [More]
Henry Ford researchers say that breastfeeding influences baby's immune system development

Henry Ford researchers say that breastfeeding influences baby's immune system development

Henry Ford Hospital researchers say that breastfeeding and other factors influence a baby's immune system development and susceptibility to allergies and asthma by what's in their gut. [More]
Researchers review ten years of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women

Researchers review ten years of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women

Researchers from the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Spain) have reviewed ten years' worth of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women. Exposure to toxic agents such as viruses, certain drugs, pesticides, alcohol and tobacco cause mitochondrial diseases about which very little is known, and which are transmitted from the mother to the foetus. [More]
Loyola pediatrician offers tips to help ease spit-up in babies after feeding

Loyola pediatrician offers tips to help ease spit-up in babies after feeding

A baby's feeding habits are a common source of questions for pediatricians. Though every baby will spit up, some do it considerably more than others, which can cause parents to think something might be wrong. [More]
ATA recommends daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements for pregnant, breastfeeding women

ATA recommends daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements for pregnant, breastfeeding women

The American Thyroid Association has championed the effort to include a daily serving of iodine in multivitamin/mineral supplements intended for pregnant and breastfeeding women, and it applauds the new guidelines released by the U.S. Council for Responsible Nutrition advising manufacturers to include 150 micrograms of iodine to these daily supplements. [More]
IOM report says white potatoes should be allowed under WIC Nutrition Program

IOM report says white potatoes should be allowed under WIC Nutrition Program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture should allow white potatoes as a vegetable eligible for purchase with vouchers issued by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC), says a new report. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement