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Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
New moms increasingly using expressed breast milk, UBC study reveals

New moms increasingly using expressed breast milk, UBC study reveals

New moms are increasingly using expressed breast milk (either pumped or expressed by hand) instead of directly breastfeeding their babies, according to a UBC study. [More]
Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Researchers from the University of Liverpool's Institute of Translational Medicine have been awarded a grant of up to US$ 8.9 million (GBP £5.8m) to lead a multinational research consortium that aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. [More]
Finding reliable health information online: an interview with Dr Andrew Boyden

Finding reliable health information online: an interview with Dr Andrew Boyden

The research was presented by pharmacists from the Calvary Public Hospital in Canberra, who looked at conversations that took place in selected parenting groups on Facebook. [More]
Increased prevalence of food allergy linked to early skin infection and eczema

Increased prevalence of food allergy linked to early skin infection and eczema

Early exposure to a food allergen through broken skin might prompt the development of food allergy. [More]
New research examines emotional and practical experiences of new mothers in infant feeding

New research examines emotional and practical experiences of new mothers in infant feeding

New research conducted by the University of Liverpool shows that mothers can experience negative emotions such as guilt, stigma and the need to defend their feeding choices regardless of how they feed their baby. [More]
New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

A new report finds some progress in combatting pneumonia and diarrhea among young children in the nations most severely impacted by the two diseases, but they remain responsible for hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths around the world. [More]
New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

Parents may be confused with how and when to introduce peanut-containing foods to their infants. [More]
Women with higher vitamin D levels have better long-term outcomes after breast cancer diagnosis

Women with higher vitamin D levels have better long-term outcomes after breast cancer diagnosis

Women with higher vitamin D levels in their blood following a breast cancer diagnosis had significantly better long-term outcomes, according to new research from Kaiser Permanente and Roswell Park Cancer Institute. [More]
Irregular sleeping patterns and skipping breakfast could make children overweight

Irregular sleeping patterns and skipping breakfast could make children overweight

Mothers smoking in pregnancy, children skipping breakfast and not having a regular bedtime or sufficient sleep all appear to be important factors in predicting whether a child will become overweight or obese, according to new research led by UCL. [More]
Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the availability of TAYTULLA (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol capsules and ferrous fumarate capsules), 1mg/20mcg, the first and only oral contraceptive in a softgel capsule for the prevention of pregnancy [More]
SMU virologist receives NCI grant to advance research into how certain viruses cause cancers

SMU virologist receives NCI grant to advance research into how certain viruses cause cancers

SMU virologist and cancer researcher Robert L. Harrod has been awarded a $436,500 grant from the National Cancer Institute to further his lab's research into how certain viruses cause cancers in humans. [More]
Infections, not antibiotics linked to increased risk of childhood obesity

Infections, not antibiotics linked to increased risk of childhood obesity

Infections during infancy - rather than antibiotic use, as previously suspected - were associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity in a Kaiser Permanente study of more than 260,000 infants over 16 years. [More]
Screening for prolactin receptor could help improve TNBC prognosis and treatment

Screening for prolactin receptor could help improve TNBC prognosis and treatment

A study conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre suggests screening breast cancer patients for the prolactin receptor could improve the prognosis for patient and may help them avoid unnecessary and invasive treatments [More]
Study identifies factors that increase risk for breast cancer in young African American women

Study identifies factors that increase risk for breast cancer in young African American women

Black women under the age of 45 are at increased risk for an aggressive form of breast cancer [estrogen receptor (ER) negative] if they experienced a high number of pregnancies, never breast fed, and/or had higher waist-to-hip ratio. [More]
Study looks at how relationship to dementia patient can affect caregiver’s depression

Study looks at how relationship to dementia patient can affect caregiver’s depression

Too often overlooked is the risk of depression in caregivers of patients with dementia, and a new study focuses on how depressive symptoms may differ depending on the familial relationship between caregiver and patient. [More]
Dermatoscope could quickly diagnose causes of breastfeeding pain, BGU research shows

Dermatoscope could quickly diagnose causes of breastfeeding pain, BGU research shows

A dermatoscope, typically used to provide magnified images for identifying skin lesions, is also useful for quickly diagnosing the causes of breastfeeding pain, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. [More]
New research shows oxytocin may increase sense of spirituality

New research shows oxytocin may increase sense of spirituality

Oxytocin has been dubbed the "love hormone" for its role promoting social bonding, altruism and more. Now new research from Duke University suggests the hormone may also support spirituality. [More]
Research finds barriers to breast feeding exist for working mothers in rural areas

Research finds barriers to breast feeding exist for working mothers in rural areas

Research has shown that for working mothers, the ability to breastfeed their babies is critical to their physical, mental and economic health as well as to their babies' cognitive and physical development. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. [More]
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