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Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
Tampa General Hospital achieves Baby-Friendly hospital designation

Tampa General Hospital achieves Baby-Friendly hospital designation

Tampa General Hospital is the first hospital in Hillsborough County – and one of only three in the Tampa Bay area – to earn the Baby-Friendly hospital designation from Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. for its commitment to supporting breastfeeding mothers and their babies. [More]
Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

Proper iodine nutrition necessary during pregnancy

New research published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that pregnant women in Sweden had inadequate levels of iodine in their diets. Proper iodine nutrition is necessary for neurological development of the fetus. [More]

Findings highlight significance of optimal breastfeeding practices during infancy, early childhood

In a new review of all relevant medical research on breastfeeding practices, infants 0 to 5 months of age who were predominantly, partially, or not breastfed had 1.5-, 4.8-, and 14.4-times higher risks of dying, respectively, compared with exclusively breastfed infants. [More]
Shire enters into agreement with Sanquin for CINRYZE

Shire enters into agreement with Sanquin for CINRYZE

Shire plc announced today it has entered into an agreement with Sanquin Blood Supply, the manufacturer of CINRYZE (C1 esterase inhibitor [human]), providing Shire access to its manufacturing technology and allowing Shire to source additional manufacturers to meet the growing demand for CINRYZE. [More]
FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

FDA accepts Allergan's resubmission of BOTOX sBLA for treatment of adults with upper limb spasticity

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted the company's resubmission of its Supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for BOTOX (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of adults with lower limb (involving ankle and toe muscles) spasticity in adults. [More]
EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company today announced positive top-line results from EMPA-REG OUTCOME. This is a long-term clinical trial investigating cardiovascular (CV) outcomes for Jardiance (empagliflozin) in more than 7,000 adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at high risk for CV events. [More]
Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Promoting breastfeeding could lead to a substantial reduction in common infections and even deaths that are more common in Indigenous infants than non-Indigenous infants, a new study suggests. [More]
Iodine supplementation during pregnancy can save costs for health care systems, society

Iodine supplementation during pregnancy can save costs for health care systems, society

Giving all pregnant women iodine supplements, even in mildly iodine deficient countries like the UK, could result in huge cost savings for health care systems and society, according to new modelling research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out CAD in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain

Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out CAD in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain

Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation. [More]
Lansinoh Laboratories, Washington Nationals create Lansinoh Family Lounge for nursing mothers

Lansinoh Laboratories, Washington Nationals create Lansinoh Family Lounge for nursing mothers

The Washington Nationals and Lansinoh Laboratories, Inc. – an Alexandria, VA-based leader in breastfeeding have partnered to create the Lansinoh Family Lounge. Conveniently located just off the First Base Line, adjacent to Section 223, the Lansinoh Lounge at Nationals Park is designed to be a quiet and cool retreat for families with young children. [More]

WABA calls for global action to support women to combine breastfeeding and work

This World Breastfeeding Week, WABA calls for concerted global action to support women to combine breastfeeding and work. [More]

2015 Lansinoh Breastfeeding Survey shows many women still struggle to breastfeed their babies

The 2015 Lansinoh Breastfeeding Survey finds nearly all women (96%) agree that breastfeeding is the best way to feed their children, but many still struggle to breastfeed for what they believe to be the ideal amount of time. [More]
First large field trial shows VSV-ZEBOV is effective against Ebola

First large field trial shows VSV-ZEBOV is effective against Ebola

A vaccine against the Ebola virus, tested in West Africa for the first time in a field trial, has proved to be effective. People who had come into close contact with someone recently infected, and who are therefore at particularly high risk, were vaccinated. [More]
Tests show VSV-ZEBOV vaccine safe and effective against Ebola

Tests show VSV-ZEBOV vaccine safe and effective against Ebola

Tests of the experimental Ebola vaccine VSV-ZEBOV in over 7500 participants in Guinea suggest that the vaccine provides high protection against the disease as early as ten days after vaccination, in adults who have potentially been exposed to the virus by coming in close contact with a recently infected person. [More]

University of Salford’s Midwifery Directorate retains UNICEF Baby Friendly accreditation

The University of Salford’s Midwifery Directorate has retained its UNICEF Baby Friendly accreditation with flying colours after receiving the UK’s highest ever mark. [More]
New moms don't receive advice on infant care from physicians, study finds

New moms don't receive advice on infant care from physicians, study finds

Many new mothers do not receive advice from physicians on aspects of infant care such as sleep position, breastfeeding, immunization and pacifier use, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening

Study reveals impact of patient navigator program on no-show rates for cervical cancer screening

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital reported a 20% decline in the rate of missed appointments for cervical cancer evaluation following a Pap smear when a patient navigator program was initiated at the referral center. [More]
FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol

FDA approves Praluent (alirocumab) Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Praluent (alirocumab) Injection, the first FDA-approved treatment in a new class of drugs known as PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) inhibitors. [More]
PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

Breastfeeding has become more common all across the world in recent years, however, breastfeeding rate has remained low in Hong Kong. One of the main reasons is that Hong Kong mothers worry about the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk to meet the growing needs of the infant. [More]
Mothers of infants with Down's syndrome need tailored breastfeeding guidance

Mothers of infants with Down's syndrome need tailored breastfeeding guidance

Despite compelling evidence about the benefits of breastfeeding little is known about the breastfeeding experiences of mothers of infants with Down's syndrome. In the UK, clinical commissioning groups and practitioners have a vital role in empowering and enabling these women to access help and support as soon as the child is born. [More]
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