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Many women choose to breastfeed their babies due to the significant health benefits provided over infant formula for both baby and mother.

Breast milk contains all the nutrients a baby requires for the first six months of life. Following this period, solid foods can gradually be introduced. The World Health Organization recommends feeding babies exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life and then continuing breastfeeding once the infant has started to eat solid food, until up to two years of age.

Antibodies present in the breast milk boost the baby’s immune system and decrease the likelihood of diarrhoea, vomiting, or chest and ear infections developing. Breast feeding is also thought to decrease the risk of obesity later in life and therefore reduces the likelihood of conditions such as type 2 diabetes developing. Breast milk is also easier to digest than commercial formula.

For the mother, breastfeeding lowers the risk for breast and ovarian cancer as well as expending up to 500 calories a day, saving money, and helping to build a strong bond with the baby.

Any amount of breastfeeding has positive effects and the longer a child is breastfed for, the longer the health benefits will last for both baby and mother.
Lilly Diabetes Alliance, Boehringer Ingelheim to present study results at ADA’s Scientific Sessions

Lilly Diabetes Alliance, Boehringer Ingelheim to present study results at ADA’s Scientific Sessions

The presentation of 35 abstracts will demonstrate the breadth and depth of the Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company Diabetes alliance portfolio at the 75th American Diabetes Association's (ADA) Scientific Sessions® in Boston, June 5-9. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
Breastfeeding duration and intelligence: an interview with Dr Bernardo Lessa Horta

Breastfeeding duration and intelligence: an interview with Dr Bernardo Lessa Horta

Our research shows a benefit of breastfeeding on performance in IQ tests that was similar to the benefit reported in previous tests among children and adolescents, suggesting that the benefits of breastfeeding are still observed in adulthood... [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
STA, Helsinn announce approval of AKYNZEO for prevention of chemotherapy-induced CINV

STA, Helsinn announce approval of AKYNZEO for prevention of chemotherapy-induced CINV

Australian biopharmaceutical company Specialised Therapeutics Australia and Helsinn, a Swiss group focused on building quality cancer care, announce that the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved AKYNZEO for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of moderately and highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy. [More]
ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare initiates Phase III trial to evaluate dolutegravir and rilpivirine in HIV patients

ViiV Healthcare today announced the start of a Phase III clinical trial programme to evaluate the safety and efficacy of dolutegravir (Tivicay) and rilpivirine (Edurant) as maintenance therapy for adult patients with HIV. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital attains Baby-Friendly designation

Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital attains Baby-Friendly designation

Baby-Friendly USA announced this week that Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has received prestigious international recognition as a Baby-Friendly designated birth facility. A hospital can only be deemed "Baby-Friendly" after the completion of a rigorous onsite assessment survey and a final review of the External Review Board. [More]
Electronic cigarettes pose particular risks to the developing brains, organs of young people

Electronic cigarettes pose particular risks to the developing brains, organs of young people

Although heavily promoted as a safer cigarette and an aid to quit smoking, electronic cigarettes and the nicotine they deliver pose particular risks to the developing brains and organs of children. Use of electronic cigarettes by school-age children has surpassed traditional cigarette smoking, and it is critical to recognize and understand the risks related to nicotine exposure, addiction, and the poor regulation of these products, as described in the comprehensive Review article "Electronic Cigarettes: Vulnerability of Youth," published in Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. presented data from a 52-week, open-label extension study (PREVAIL OLE) showing that Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules offered a long-term adjunctive treatment option with a favorable tolerability profile for a high proportion of patients with refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). [More]
New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

While a large number of women quit or reduce smoking upon pregnancy recognition, many resume smoking postpartum. Previous research has estimated that approximately 70% of women who quit smoking during pregnancy relapse within the first year after childbirth, and of those who relapse, 67% resume smoking by three months, and up to 90% by six months. [More]
Study focuses on how women experience sex after childbirth

Study focuses on how women experience sex after childbirth

New mothers in the Philippines spend more time in the bedroom with their partner in the first few weeks after giving birth than they did before they became pregnant. [More]
Breastfeeding not a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity, research shows

Breastfeeding not a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity, research shows

Biologic research does not support breastfeeding as a cure-all front-line strategy to prevent obesity. Yes, while breastfeeding is the optimal first food for a baby, it's not as simple to say that it will protect all children from becoming obese. [More]
Breastfeeding is not a frontline strategy to prevent obesity, say researchers

Breastfeeding is not a frontline strategy to prevent obesity, say researchers

A new study supports human milk as the optimal first food for babies, but the study raises questions about whether breast milk protects children from becoming obese. [More]
Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

Breast milk purchased online has significant amounts of cow's milk added, study finds

A study published today on the safety of human breast milk bought over the Internet found that 10 percent of samples contained added cow's milk. The discovery that purchased samples of human milk may be purposely "topped off" with cow's milk or infant formula confirms a danger for the large number of babies receiving the purchased milk due to medical conditions. [More]
Asian leaders gather in Vietnam to discuss role of parliamentarians in child health, nutrition

Asian leaders gather in Vietnam to discuss role of parliamentarians in child health, nutrition

Leaders and parliamentarians from Asian countries will gather today to recognize the vital role of parliamentarian leaders in advancing child nutrition and development. [More]
Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire announces availability of Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection in U.S.

Shire plc today announced that Natpara (parathyroid hormone) for injection is now available in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Natpara as an adjunct to calcium and vitamin D to control hypocalcemia in patients with hypoparathyroidism on January 23, 2015. [More]
Uganda Newborn Study explores ways to improve child mortality rates

Uganda Newborn Study explores ways to improve child mortality rates

In Uganda, child mortality rates are improving, but progress is slower for deaths occurring in the first four weeks of life, or the newborn period, and for stillbirths. But recent evidence from local researchers show that a cost-effective package of care linking families, government-mandated village health teams (a form of community health workers), and health facilities can improve life-saving practices during pregnancy, childbirth and in the first weeks of life; and benefit poorest families the most. [More]
Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

The proposed link between caffeine and reductions in the beta amyloid plaque accumulation characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest a possible role for caffeine in AD treatment. The latest evidence linking beta amyloid protein to Alzheimer's disease and exploring the relationship between caffeine and beta amyloid are featured in a review article in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
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