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Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

An international team including scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has identified the molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells. [More]
Toronto researchers design simple chip for faster, easier detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Toronto researchers design simple chip for faster, easier detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

We live in fear of 'superbugs': infectious bacteria that don't respond to treatment by antibiotics, and can turn a routine hospital stay into a nightmare. A 2015 Health Canada report estimates that superbugs have already cost Canadians $1 billion, and are a "serious and growing issue." Each year two million people in the U.S. contract antibiotic-resistant infections, and at least 23,000 people die as a direct result. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Food safety awareness is key to understanding the food safety issues on the horizon, and clinicians at hospitals and doctors' offices play a key role in ensuring consumers are aware of the threats of foodborne illness, said the University of Georgia's Michael Doyle. [More]
Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

An Australian researcher has helped identify the kind of human trial that is most effective for testing Ebola vaccines. [More]
Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

A team led by researchers from UC San Francisco, Organic Health Response, and Microclinic International is reporting results of a study that showed significant benefits of microclinics -- an innovative intervention that mobilized rural Kenyan HIV patients' informal social networks to support their staying in care. [More]
Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can lead to a significant improvement in outcomes after major urologic surgery. These new data and their impact on urologic surgery will be highlighted by study authors during a special press conference at the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. [More]
New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

Army scientists working to support the Ebola virus outbreak response in West Africa have established the first genomic surveillance capability in Liberia, enabling them to monitor genetic changes in the virus within one week of sample collection. An article describing their work was recently published ahead of print in the online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
Bathing patients in common hospital soap can reduce MRSA contamination

Bathing patients in common hospital soap can reduce MRSA contamination

Holding hope for a relatively inexpensive way to improve care and prevent the spread of deadly hospital-acquired infections, a new study reports that bathing patients in a common hospital soap, called chlorhexidine, was equally effective in preventing the transmission of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as the common practice of having healthcare workers avoid physical contact with the patients. [More]
Soligenix, Emergent BioSolutions sign development agreement

Soligenix, Emergent BioSolutions sign development agreement

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that it has initiated a development agreement with Emergent BioSolutions to implement a commercially viable, scalable production technology for the RiVax drug substance protein antigen. [More]
9-Valent HPV vaccine can potentially prevent 80% of cervical cancers in the U.S.

9-Valent HPV vaccine can potentially prevent 80% of cervical cancers in the U.S.

The new 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine, can potentially prevent 80 percent of cervical cancers in the United States, if given to all 11- or 12-year-old children before they are exposed to the virus. [More]
Special JHTR issue highlights ongoing CDC efforts to reduce population impact of TBI

Special JHTR issue highlights ongoing CDC efforts to reduce population impact of TBI

Ongoing efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reduce the population impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are documented in the May/June issue of The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America. [More]
Southern Indiana to be oasis free from Lyme disease, finds Indiana University researcher

Southern Indiana to be oasis free from Lyme disease, finds Indiana University researcher

Over nearly 15 years spent studying ticks, Indiana University's Keith Clay has found southern Indiana to be an oasis free from Lyme disease, the condition most associated with these arachnids that are the second most common parasitic disease vector on Earth. [More]
Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, received the Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award on April 28 at the University. [More]
GW Cancer Institute brings free, online training for oncology patient navigators

GW Cancer Institute brings free, online training for oncology patient navigators

The George Washington University Cancer Institute has developed the first free, online, comprehensive training that covers the fundamentals of oncology patient navigation in the U.S. The training, funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is evidence-based and supported by the GW Cancer Institute's groundbreaking research in this emerging field. [More]
New research could help predict outbreaks of West Nile virus disease in the U.S.

New research could help predict outbreaks of West Nile virus disease in the U.S.

New research has identified correlations between weather conditions and the occurrence of West Nile virus disease in the United States, raising the possibility of being able to better predict outbreaks. [More]
Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many adults in the U.S. are not getting the recommended screening tests for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers, according to data published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. For 2013, screening for these types of cancers either fell behind previous rates or showed no improvement. [More]
Researchers report new primary care model to address trauma

Researchers report new primary care model to address trauma

Recognizing that patients' experiences of childhood and adult trauma are common and have a direct impact on their health, UCSF clinical researchers and Positive Women's Network-USA have developed and are reporting a new primary care model. [More]
Symbiomix closes $41 million Series A financing and reports positive results from SYM-1219 Phase 2 trial

Symbiomix closes $41 million Series A financing and reports positive results from SYM-1219 Phase 2 trial

Symbiomix Therapeutics today announced multiple milestones, including the closing of the third and final tranche of a $41 million Series A financing and positive results from a multi-center, randomized Phase 2 trial testing a single oral dose of SYM-1219 for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV). [More]
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