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MUHC study examines effect of regular re-evaluation of antibiotic use on cost, C. difficile infection rates

MUHC study examines effect of regular re-evaluation of antibiotic use on cost, C. difficile infection rates

Resistance to antibiotics is an important health concern that affects both the spread of infections, like Clostridium difficile, and the medication budget. Researchers at the McGill University Health Centre examined the effectiveness of adopting an antibiotic "time-out" during treatment, which involves regularly re-evaluating the treatment strategy as the clinical situation evolves. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Among approximately 26,000 women, receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery or small-for-gestational-age birth or with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, although a small increased risk of being diagnosed with chorioamnionitis (an inflammation of the membranes that surround the fetus) was observed, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Five simple steps to reduce type-2 diabetes

Five simple steps to reduce type-2 diabetes

There are 29 million U.S. adults diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 1 in 3 diagnosed as pre-diabetic. Diabetes is a serious disease which can result in serious health complications including nerve damage, vision loss, heart disease, and kidney failure, to name a few. [More]
Two new oral medications post-transplant is safe, beneficial for patients with hepatitis C

Two new oral medications post-transplant is safe, beneficial for patients with hepatitis C

All patients with hepatitis C who receive a liver transplant will eventually infect their new livers. These transplanted organs then require anti-viral treatment before they become severely damaged. But traditional post-transplant hepatitis C therapy can take up to a year, is potentially toxic and can lead to organ rejection. [More]
Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, once considered a high-risk procedure, carries a complication and mortality rate comparable to some of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in America, including gallbladder surgery, appendectomy, and total knee replacement, according to new research from the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute. [More]
Study shows strong correlation between low-calorie sweetener consumption, healthy lifestyles

Study shows strong correlation between low-calorie sweetener consumption, healthy lifestyles

New research from the University of Washington examining data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of more than 22,000 people has found that consumers of foods and beverages made with no, low, and reduced-calorie sweeteners have better quality diets and are more likely to be physically active. [More]
Study shows racial disparity in autism identification

Study shows racial disparity in autism identification

The number of children diagnosed with autism has increased in recent years, but a new study co-authored by a University of Kansas professor shows that while the number of students with autism increased in every state from 2000 to 2007, black and Hispanic children were significantly underrepresented. [More]
Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Fall in the United States means residents in most of the country will see fewer mosquitoes and less risk of the diseases they spread. However, the chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean and Central and South American countries continues to spread with no sign of slowing down. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the painful mosquito-borne disease will likely continue to infect travelers to the region during the rest of this year and beyond. [More]
Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Despite evidence that cervical cancer screening saves lives, about eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened. [More]
Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Patients with obesity take significantly fewer medications after weight-loss surgery than their non-surgical counterparts, and end up spending 22.4 percent less on drugs for diabetes and heart disease after four years, according to new research. [More]
Novo Nordisk announces re-launch of online patient support platform for people with diabetes

Novo Nordisk announces re-launch of online patient support platform for people with diabetes

Novo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes care, today announced the re-launch of Cornerstones4Care, an award-winning online patient support platform for people living with diabetes. [More]
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service receives grant to help reduce chronic diseases

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service receives grant to help reduce chronic diseases

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has been awarded a "Programs to Reduce Obesity in High-Obesity Areas" grant to support national efforts by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities and control health care spending. [More]
FDA approves Fluzone High-Dose vaccine sBLA to include efficacy data in Prescribing Information

FDA approves Fluzone High-Dose vaccine sBLA to include efficacy data in Prescribing Information

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the supplemental biologics license application (sBLA) for Fluzone High-Dose (Influenza Vaccine) to include efficacy data in the Prescribing Information. [More]
Profectus BioSciences gets funding to develop VesiculoVax Zaire-Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences gets funding to develop VesiculoVax Zaire-Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, announced today that the Department of Defense through the Medical Countermeasure Systems-Joint Vaccine Acquisition Program, a subordinate command of the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense, Edgewood, MD, has contracted the manufacture and IND-enabling preclinical testing of the Profectus trivalent Ebola/Marburg vaccine. [More]
Google search data can provide more accurate real time picture of flu

Google search data can provide more accurate real time picture of flu

Researchers have found that Google search data really can provide a more accurate real time picture of current flu infections. [More]
Research shows that copper could help to prevent Ebola spread

Research shows that copper could help to prevent Ebola spread

Research from the University of Southampton has indicated that copper could help to prevent the spread of Ebola. [More]
WUSM researchers sequence genome of enterovirus D68 samples from patients

WUSM researchers sequence genome of enterovirus D68 samples from patients

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have sequenced the genome of enterovirus D68 sampled from patients treated at St. Louis Children's Hospital. Nationwide, the virus has spread rapidly in recent months and caused severe respiratory illness in young children, with some patients requiring hospitalization. [More]
Study: Obese youths with ALL have worse outcomes than lean counterparts

Study: Obese youths with ALL have worse outcomes than lean counterparts

Obese youths with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have worse outcomes than their lean counterparts. To find out why, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles studied patients who were obese at the time of their diagnosis with ALL to determine if body mass index (BMI) impacted response to initial chemotherapy. This response to initial chemotherapy (or induction therapy) is measured by the absence of leukemia cells in the bone marrow. [More]
Johns Hopkins to lead, design interactive Web-based Ebola training program

Johns Hopkins to lead, design interactive Web-based Ebola training program

Johns Hopkins Medicine has been tasked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to lead a group and to design an interactive Web-based learning program that guides health care workers, nurses and physicians through government-approved protocols to aid clinicians as they provide care to patients who may be at risk of contracting the Ebola virus. [More]