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Family physician  answers questions related to Ebola virus

Family physician answers questions related to Ebola virus

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the outbreak of Ebola in four West African countries is one of the largest outbreaks of the disease in history. [More]
First U.S. case of Ebola diagnosed in Texas

First U.S. case of Ebola diagnosed in Texas

The patient, who reportedly took a Sept. 20 commercial flight from Liberia to Dallas, represents the first case in the current outbreak diagnosed outside of Africa. [More]
Rapid and coordinated response aids in controlling Ebola outbreak in Nigeria

Rapid and coordinated response aids in controlling Ebola outbreak in Nigeria

The Ebola outbreak in Nigeria appears to be nearing a possible end thanks to a rapid response coordinated by Nigeria's Emergency Operations Center with assistance from international partners, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [More]
Luminex gets FDA approval to add three new targets to xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel

Luminex gets FDA approval to add three new targets to xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel

Luminex Corporation today announced it has received U.S. FDA clearance to add three new targets to its xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP). The targets include Adenovirus 40/41, Entamoeba histolytica and Vibrio cholerae. [More]
UCSF gets CDC grant to provide expert guidance to clinicians who prescribe anti-HIV medications

UCSF gets CDC grant to provide expert guidance to clinicians who prescribe anti-HIV medications

The UCSF Clinician Consultation Center at San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center has been funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide a PrEPline, a telephone consultation service that gives expert guidance to healthcare providers across the nation who prescribe antiretroviral medications to HIV uninfected individuals to prevent HIV. [More]
State highlights: Calif. health insurers and contraception coverage; Alaska sues Xerox over Medicaid payment systems

State highlights: Calif. health insurers and contraception coverage; Alaska sues Xerox over Medicaid payment systems

Health insurance policies in California will have to cover all federally approved contraceptives for women by 2016 without charging co-payments under legislation signed this week by Gov. Jerry Brown, countering trends in other states and the U.S. Supreme Court. The bill, SB1053 by Sen. Holly Mitchell, D-Los Angeles, expands state laws that required coverage for most birth-control drugs and devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The new law mandates coverage for all FDA-approved contraception, prohibits co-payments and includes managed-care Medi-Cal plans, which are not expressly covered by current laws (Egelko, 9/27). [More]

CDC forecast: Ebola epidemic could infect more than 1.4 million people by January end

The Ebola epidemic could claim hundreds of thousands of lives and infect more than 1.4 million people by the end of January, according to a statistical forecast released this week by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
UTHealth researchers awarded $1.3 million grant to study asthma risk in Texas health care workers

UTHealth researchers awarded $1.3 million grant to study asthma risk in Texas health care workers

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health have been awarded a four-year, $1.3 million grant by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to study how the risk of asthma has changed for health care workers in Texas over the last 10 years. [More]
Tips for instilling positive dental habits in children

Tips for instilling positive dental habits in children

It's possible you've heard the alarming news; over 78% of adult Americans currently have some form of gum disease. [More]
Capital Bluecross encourages people to make use of National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

Capital Bluecross encourages people to make use of National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

To support a nationwide effort to clear homes of potentially dangerous, expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs, Capital BlueCross is reminding residents to take advantage of the Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA) National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27. Take-Back Day collection is free and anonymous. [More]
Dynamical glucometry may uncover new ways of understanding diabetes

Dynamical glucometry may uncover new ways of understanding diabetes

For millions of people in the United States living with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, measuring the daily rise and fall of blood glucose (sugar) is a way of life. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
C-Path renews grant to advance more effective drug treatments for TB

C-Path renews grant to advance more effective drug treatments for TB

The Critical Path Institute, an independent, non-profit organization that works to accelerate the speed of drug and medical product development, today announced it has received a three-year grant renewal from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Curcumin, cancer-inhibiting peptides show promise in slowing progression of mesothelioma

Curcumin, cancer-inhibiting peptides show promise in slowing progression of mesothelioma

A common Asian spice and cancer-hampering molecules show promise in slowing the progression of mesothelioma, a cancer of the lung's lining often linked to asbestos. Scientists from Case Western Reserve University and the Georg-Speyer-Haus in Frankfurt, Germany, demonstrate that application of curcumin, a derivative of the spice turmeric, and cancer-inhibiting peptides increase levels of a protein inhibitor known to combat the progression of this cancer. [More]
SLU pediatric researcher to study efficacy of new hepatitis C drug treatment in children

SLU pediatric researcher to study efficacy of new hepatitis C drug treatment in children

After the success of a new drug treatment in adults with hepatitis C infection, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is testing the safety and efficacy of the medications in children. [More]
Soligenix awarded $24.7 million contract to advance development of Rivax vaccine

Soligenix awarded $24.7 million contract to advance development of Rivax vaccine

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that it has been awarded a contract valued at up to $24.7 million inclusive of options by the US Department of Health and Human Service's National Institutes of Health (specifically funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases or NIAID). [More]
Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Only about half of all pregnant women in the U.S. get a flu shot each season, leaving thousands of moms-to-be and their babies at increased risk of serious illness. [More]

Census shows health insurance coverage winners, losers

Among the 25 biggest cities, uninsured rates last year ranged from almost 25 percent in Miami and 23 percent in Houston to just more than 4 percent in Boston and 7.5 percent in Pittsburgh, according to Census data. [More]
Socioeconomic inequalities influence overall outcomes for children with asthma

Socioeconomic inequalities influence overall outcomes for children with asthma

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 6 percent of children younger than five have been diagnosed with asthma, the fastest-growing and most common chronic illness affecting children in the United States. [More]
FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy designation to EYLEA Injection for treatment of diabetic retinopathy

FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy designation to EYLEA Injection for treatment of diabetic retinopathy

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). [More]