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Parents do not perceive need to vaccinate children against influenza, study finds

Parents do not perceive need to vaccinate children against influenza, study finds

Despite the fact that influenza leads to more hospitalizations and deaths among children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, parents frequently decline vaccinating their children against influenza because they don't perceive the need, according to a new case-control study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth, Pennsylvania leaders launch new campaign to help combat sepsis

PinnacleHealth System launched its "Knock Out Sepsis" campaign this morning from the Harrisburg State Capitol Rotunda steps joined by Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Karen Murphy, Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller, State Representatives Mike Regan and Patty Kim, sepsis survivors Russ DiGilio, Aaron Stoner, and Carol Brame, mother of Sean Brame, and medical professionals on the frontlines of combatting sepsis. [More]
Seattle Children's pediatrician encourages families to adopt mindful eating to prevent obesity

Seattle Children's pediatrician encourages families to adopt mindful eating to prevent obesity

Traditional advice for helping families ensure their children and teens maintain a healthy weight begins with a focus on balancing calories consumed from food and beverages with calories used through physical activity and growth. [More]
Department of Defense funds cardiac cell therapy trial for heart failure patients

Department of Defense funds cardiac cell therapy trial for heart failure patients

Building on the results of a recent Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute study published just six months ago, the Department of Defense has awarded a $10 million grant to fund a cardiac cell therapy trial for patients diagnosed with a common but difficult-to-treat form of heart failure. [More]

Study finds alcohol-involvement in significant proportion of homicide victims in the U.S.

While the association between alcohol and homicide may seem obvious, there has been no recent study of alcohol involvement in homicide victimization in U.S. states. [More]
Dental fillings contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, research shows

Dental fillings contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, research shows

Dental surface restorations composed of dental amalgam, a mixture of mercury, silver, tin and other metals, significantly contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, according to new research from the University of Georgia's department of environmental health science in the College of Public Health. [More]
New project clarifies molecular processes involved in hidden HIV reservoir

New project clarifies molecular processes involved in hidden HIV reservoir

In spite of ever more effective therapies, HIV keeps managing to survive in the body. A comprehensive project conducted by the Austrian Science Fund FWF has clarified the molecular processes which contribute to this effect. [More]
Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Children and teenagers who are obese have different microorganisms living in the digestive tract than their lean counterparts, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
IU receives $1.9 million grant to investigate effects of congenital birth defects and age on the eye

IU receives $1.9 million grant to investigate effects of congenital birth defects and age on the eye

A $1.9 million grant to Indiana University from the National Institutes of Health's National Eye Institute will advance basic research on the eye with applications to blindness caused by genetic disorders and aging. [More]
Guidelines for staying healthy during flu season

Guidelines for staying healthy during flu season

The American Academy of Pediatrics updated its annual influenza (flu) season guidelines, withdrawing the child-friendly nasal flu vaccine, FluMist, this year. [More]
Study focuses on precipitating circumstances of suicide in children and early adolescents

Study focuses on precipitating circumstances of suicide in children and early adolescents

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide was the 10th leading cause of death for children ages 5 to 11 in 2014. This was the first time suicide had shown up in the CDC's top ten leading causes of death for children in this age group. [More]
New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

The increase in illnesses and deaths linked to medication-resistant bacteria has been well-documented by researchers and received extensive public attention in recent years. Now, UCLA-led research shows how these bacteria are making it more difficult to treat a common but severe kidney infection. [More]
Infant Mortality Awareness Month: NICHQ launches campaign to combat infant mortality

Infant Mortality Awareness Month: NICHQ launches campaign to combat infant mortality

National Institute for Children's Health Quality, an independent, nonprofit organization working to improve children’s health, today announced the launch of its annual campaign to combat infant mortality in conjunction with Infant Mortality Awareness Month. [More]
Over a quarter of US adults aged 50 years or more are inactive

Over a quarter of US adults aged 50 years or more are inactive

Research conducted at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that 1 in 4 US adults aged 50 years or over do not take regular exercise. [More]
UGA forms partnership with The Forum Institute to implement preconception to infancy initiative

UGA forms partnership with The Forum Institute to implement preconception to infancy initiative

The University of Georgia College of Public Health has announced a new strategic partnership with The Forum Institute, an Oregon-based nonprofit think tank, to implement a first-of-its-kind preconception to infancy public health initiative for the state of Georgia. [More]
Scientists discover potential new genetic causes for intellectual disability

Scientists discover potential new genetic causes for intellectual disability

An international group of researchers has for the first time identified a set of 30 inherited recessive genes that play a role in intellectual disability (ID), a neurodevelopmental disorder that, according to the Centers for Disease Control, affects as many as 213 million people around the world. [More]
Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Research conducted by Griffith University and Melbourne-based company Paradigm Biopharmaceuticals Limited has uncovered a potential new therapeutic treatment for the global battle against mosquito-borne alphavirus infections, including the debilitating Ross River Virus (RRV) and Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV). [More]
USPSTF recommends screening for LTBI in populations at increased risk

USPSTF recommends screening for LTBI in populations at increased risk

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for latent tuberculosis infection in populations at increased risk. [More]
New protocol may decrease occurrence of POAF in heart patients

New protocol may decrease occurrence of POAF in heart patients

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition in which the upper chambers of the heart contract in a way that's out of sync with the lower chambers, causing an irregular heartbeat and poor blood flow to the body. [More]
New study details design and validation of accurate screening test for detecting deadly HAIs

New study details design and validation of accurate screening test for detecting deadly HAIs

A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute details the design and validation of a low-cost, rapid and highly accurate screening tool -- known as KlebSeq -- for potentially deadly healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), such as Klebsiella pneumoniae. [More]
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