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Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics

Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics

During the winter months, patients frequently present with respiratory symptoms like coughing, sneezing and fever that could be caused by one of several bacterial and viral infections including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or bacterial pneumonia. [More]
Factors that impact fertility in men

Factors that impact fertility in men

Starting a family can be a stressful process, and there are things that can affect your plans that you may not have considered. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 18 percent of men who sought help with a fertility specialist were diagnosed with a male-related infertility. [More]
PinnacleHealth’s initiative helps reduce opioid prescriptions in primary care setting

PinnacleHealth’s initiative helps reduce opioid prescriptions in primary care setting

PinnacleHealth Medical Group, a network of more than 200 primary care providers and specialists, singled out opioid abuse epidemic and initiated a formal opioid reduction program in 2014. [More]
Study detects biomarkers from secondhand marijuana smoke exposure in children

Study detects biomarkers from secondhand marijuana smoke exposure in children

Relaxing with a joint around children is not very wise. Not only do youngsters inhale harmful secondary smoke in the process, but the psychoactive chemicals in the drug are taken up by their bodies as well. [More]
Age restriction on indoor tanning could save thousands from melanoma

Age restriction on indoor tanning could save thousands from melanoma

An age restriction on indoor tanning could save thousands of lives and millions of dollars, according to new research published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. [More]
Cedars-Sinai receives $7.3 million grant to test safety of novel cell-based therapy in treating PAH

Cedars-Sinai receives $7.3 million grant to test safety of novel cell-based therapy in treating PAH

Researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine are expanding their ongoing evaluation of a novel cell-based therapeutic candidate into the area of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). [More]
Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

National surveys in Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Zambia reveal exceptional progress against HIV, with decreasing rates of new infection, stable numbers of people living with HIV, and more than half of all those living with HIV showing viral suppression through use of antiretroviral medication. For those on antiretroviral medication, viral suppression is close to 90 percent. [More]
Special article outlines recommended strategies to prevent Zika from blood transfusion

Special article outlines recommended strategies to prevent Zika from blood transfusion

As the Zika epidemic spreads to the United States, the potential for contracting the disease via blood transfusion has emerged as a serious concern. [More]
New drug receives FDA approval to reduce risk of cardiovascular death in adults with diabetes

New drug receives FDA approval to reduce risk of cardiovascular death in adults with diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for Jardiance (empagliflozin) to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants, report reveals

A team of researchers in Brazil and at the Yale School of Public Health has published the first report demonstrating that the Zika virus can cause glaucoma in infants who were exposed to the virus during gestation. [More]
Study highlights need to increase handwashing compliance among child care workers

Study highlights need to increase handwashing compliance among child care workers

Child care personnel properly clean their hands less than a quarter of the times they are supposed to, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy have higher mortality risk, study reveals

Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy have higher mortality risk, study reveals

U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans (IAVs) with epilepsy were more than twice as likely to die between 2011 and 2015 as were similar veterans without epilepsy. A study published Nov. 11 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report revealed that IAVs were found to have a higher prevalence of mental and physical comorbidity and to have substantially higher mortality than were veterans without epilepsy. [More]
Private practitioners urge patients to choose physical therapy over opioids to manage pain

Private practitioners urge patients to choose physical therapy over opioids to manage pain

Prescription opioid headlines are staggering: 40 Americans die each day from overdoses involving prescription opioids; they cost the United States economy $78.5 billion a year; and 227 million opioid prescriptions were handed out in the U.S. in 2015. [More]
UAB physician calls for better education, legislation to help patients with opioid abuse

UAB physician calls for better education, legislation to help patients with opioid abuse

The U.S. opioid epidemic has evolved so much in the last four years that current federal policy responses risk diminishing returns in saving human lives, according to a new peer-reviewed perspective by University of Alabama at Birmingham Associate Professor of Preventive medicine Stefan Kertesz, M.D. His perspective was published online in the addiction journal Substance Abuse. [More]
Adolescent obesity may lead to irreparable bone damage

Adolescent obesity may lead to irreparable bone damage

Teenagers who are obese may be doing irreparable damage to their bones, according to a new study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Early identification may be key to stop type 2 diabetes

Early identification may be key to stop type 2 diabetes

What's the best way to stop type 2 diabetes? Find it before it becomes a problem. "The phrase I use is prevention by detection," said Joseph Aloi, M.D., section chief of endocrinology and metabolism at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. [More]
Study compares reach of quitlines to number of tobacco users for different racial/ethnic groups

Study compares reach of quitlines to number of tobacco users for different racial/ethnic groups

Quitlines, hotlines that provide free cessation services for smokers, appear to be reaching minority populations that typically underutilize cessation treatments and have high smoking prevalence, particularly African Americans and American Indians/Alaska Natives. [More]
Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Grady Health System Assistant Chief of Internal Medicine and Emory University School of Medicine Professor H. Kenneth Walker, M.D., was awarded the prestigious Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Georgia Hospital Association's (GHA) Annual Meeting on Nov. 11. [More]
West Nile virus may cause delayed fatalities long after recovery, new study finds

West Nile virus may cause delayed fatalities long after recovery, new study finds

West Nile virus may be much more deadly than previously believed, with deaths attributable to the mosquito-borne disease occurring not just in the immediate aftermath of the infection but also years later, long after patients seem to have recovered from the initial illness, according to a new study presented today at the 2016 Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) [More]
Leishmaniasis infection rates increase among ecotourists, soldiers in the U.S.

Leishmaniasis infection rates increase among ecotourists, soldiers in the U.S.

Driven by burgeoning ecotourism and military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, a parasitic infection called leishmaniasis is showing up in more U.S. patients, often stumping doctors. [More]
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