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Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center has earned the coveted Baby-Friendly designation. This verifies that the hospital has implemented the ten steps to help new mothers successfully breastfeed. [More]
Childbearing women who take painkillers may face increased risk of birth defects

Childbearing women who take painkillers may face increased risk of birth defects

More than one-fourth of privately-insured and one-third of Medicaid-enrolled women of childbearing age filled prescriptions for opioid-based (narcotic) painkillers between 2008 and 2012, according to a new analysis published today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers visiting developing parts of the world at higher risk for contracting superbugs and spreading these daunting drug-resistant bacteria to their home countries, according to a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans researcher discovers fragment of toxic Ebola virus protein

LSU Health New Orleans researcher discovers fragment of toxic Ebola virus protein

William Gallaher, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has discovered a fragment of an Ebola virus protein that is toxic to cells and may contribute to infection and illness. [More]
UTMB study reveals that only about half of teenage girls get HPV vaccine at the recommended age

UTMB study reveals that only about half of teenage girls get HPV vaccine at the recommended age

It's a virus that is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer but a new study by University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers indicates that only about half of the girls receive the vaccine at the recommended age to best protect themselves. [More]
Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what's on their minds. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that the social media platform has another use: Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community's psychological well being and can predict rates of heart disease. [More]
New American Lung Association report calls on California to reduce tobacco-caused death and disease

New American Lung Association report calls on California to reduce tobacco-caused death and disease

Once a national leader in tobacco control efforts, progress is at a standstill in California as advances in statewide tobacco control policies have stagnated. These were the findings of the 13th annual American Lung Association State of Tobacco Control 2015 report released today. [More]
Early estimates indicate flu vaccine is providing little protection in US

Early estimates indicate flu vaccine is providing little protection in US

Each year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) undertake flu vaccine effectiveness studies. Early estimates for the current season indicate that those people (all ages) who had the flu vaccine were only 23% less likely to have to go to the doctor because of flu (influenza). [More]
Report: Folic acid saves babies from neural tube defects

Report: Folic acid saves babies from neural tube defects

Fortifying grain foods with the B vitamin folic acid has saved about 1,300 babies every year from being born with serious birth defects of the brain and spine known as neural tube defects (NTDs), according to new data published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Lung cancer rates are lower in higher-elevation counties, new study finds

Here's another potential reason to live up in the mountains. Lung cancer rates in both smokers and non-smokers are lower in higher-elevation counties in the western part of the United States, suggesting that oxygen may promote the incidence of lung cancer, according to a new study co-authored by a student at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Tips to avoid winter slips and falls

Tips to avoid winter slips and falls

Tread lightly and don't get too confident; winter is officially here and sidewalks are slippery. About 1 million people take a tumble every year and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 20,000 people die annually due to fall-related injuries. [More]
Current flu vaccine still offers protection, says Loyola infectious disease specialist

Current flu vaccine still offers protection, says Loyola infectious disease specialist

In baseball, three strikes and you're out. The most common annual vaccine targets three strains of flu virus. This year, two vaccine strains are spot on and successfully matched. One strain is partially mismatched, but still believed to offer partial coverage for that strain. The current flu vaccine is still in the game and, more importantly, keeping people well and on the playing field, says a Loyola University Medical Center infectious disease specialist. [More]
Everyday actions could help prevent spread of flu among college students

Everyday actions could help prevent spread of flu among college students

As local college students return to Philadelphia from their long winter breaks over the next several days, it is likely that they'll be bringing who-knows-what germs with them from home, said Stacey A. Gorski, PhD, a biology professor who specializes in immunology at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. [More]
Personal traits may help protect police officers from PTSD symptoms

Personal traits may help protect police officers from PTSD symptoms

Personal traits such as resilience, satisfaction with life and a grateful disposition may help shield police officers from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of a natural disaster. [More]
Most Americans unaware of the positive benefits of folic acid

Most Americans unaware of the positive benefits of folic acid

Each year, more than four million women in America give birth and 2,600 infants are born with neural tube defects. [More]
Sirnaomics submits STP705 IND Application to CFDA for skin scar treatment

Sirnaomics submits STP705 IND Application to CFDA for skin scar treatment

Sirnaomics, Inc. and its affiliate Suzhou Sirnaomics Pharmaceutics, Co. Ltd., together with its partner Guangzhou Xiangxue Pharmaceutical, Co. Ltd., (SZSE: 300147), have formally submitted an Investigational New Drug (IND) Application to the China Food and Drug Administration for STP705, an anti-fibrosis RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic for prevention and treatment of human skin hypertrophic scars. [More]
Synthetic Biologics doses first patient in SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics doses first patient in SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced that enrollment has initiated and the first patient was dosed in a Phase 1b clinical trial of SYN-004, an investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme for the prevention of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and secondary antibiotic-resistant infections in patients receiving intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. [More]
House call medicine may be better than walk-in clinics, hospitals

House call medicine may be better than walk-in clinics, hospitals

For many people, insured or not, a walk-in clinic may seem like the most viable option for quick health care when a problem arises. [More]
Protein Sciences earns Frost & Sullivan 2013 Global New Product Innovation Award

Protein Sciences earns Frost & Sullivan 2013 Global New Product Innovation Award

Based on its recent analysis of the influenza vaccines market, Frost & Sullivan recognises Protein Sciences with the 2013 Global New Product Innovation Award. Flublok is the world's first recombinant protein vaccine for the prevention of seasonal influenza disease to gain U.S. FDA approval. [More]
Actavis receives complete response letter for nebivolol/valsartan FDC for treatment of hypertension

Actavis receives complete response letter for nebivolol/valsartan FDC for treatment of hypertension

Actavis plc today confirmed that the Company has received a complete response letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its New Drug Application (NDA) for the fixed-dose combination (FDC) of nebivolol and valsartan for the treatment of hypertension. [More]