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Ecologists reveal reasons for regional differences in Lyme disease prevalence

Ecologists reveal reasons for regional differences in Lyme disease prevalence

The ticks that transmit Lyme disease to people die of dehydration when exposed to a combination of high temperature and lowered humidity, a new USGS-led study has found. [More]
Researchers develop new method to detect cannabinoids in breast milk

Researchers develop new method to detect cannabinoids in breast milk

With the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana spreading across the country, the drug's use is reportedly increasing among pregnant women. [More]
CDC guidelines for PrEP use to prevent HIV transmission do not go far enough, UCLA study suggests

CDC guidelines for PrEP use to prevent HIV transmission do not go far enough, UCLA study suggests

A new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health suggests modifying federal health guidelines related to the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission because current standards could miss some people who should be on it. [More]
Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Despite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to an editorial written by Laura E. Mitchell, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Study establishes harmonized reference ranges for total testosterone in men

Study establishes harmonized reference ranges for total testosterone in men

A large study of more than 9,000 men has established harmonized reference ranges for total testosterone in men that when applied to assays that have been appropriately calibrated will effectively enable clinicians to make a correct diagnosis of hypogonadism, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted a dozen focus groups with 70 straight and gay/bisexual Hispanic and African-American males ages 15 to 24 report that gaining a better understanding of the context in which young men grow up will allow health care providers to improve this population's use of sexual and reproductive health care. [More]
New review finds successful outcomes for Achilles tendon tear with surgical and nonsurgical treatments

New review finds successful outcomes for Achilles tendon tear with surgical and nonsurgical treatments

A new literature review published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found successful outcomes for an Achilles tendon tear with either minimally invasive surgery or nonsurgical bracing with a removable boot, especially in recreational athletes. [More]
New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration's campaign to limit healthcare facility-associated infections (HAIs) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to make significant progress, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology . [More]
Overweight, obese children at increased risk of developing surgical site infectios, study shows

Overweight, obese children at increased risk of developing surgical site infectios, study shows

Overweight and obese children are at the highest risk for the most common complications from surgery, an infection at the site of the surgical procedure. This according to a new study, recently published in the medical journal, Surgical Infections. [More]
Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Funding and publication of gun violence research are disproportionately low compared to other leading causes of death in the United States, according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Study confirms presence of ticks carrying Lyme disease in eastern national parks

Study confirms presence of ticks carrying Lyme disease in eastern national parks

Lyme disease has been spreading across the United States over the past several decades, and a new study has confirmed that ticks carrying the disease are present in eastern national parks. [More]
Gulf Breeze Recovery underscores importance of high-quality programs for treating opioid addiction

Gulf Breeze Recovery underscores importance of high-quality programs for treating opioid addiction

As opioid addiction hits record highs, Gulf Breeze Recovery, a Florida-based addiction recovery center, stresses the importance of high-quality, successful programs for treating addiction. [More]
Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). [More]
Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

Experimenting with human cells and mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that a genetic mutation that alters a protein called NOD1 may increase susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. [More]
Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

The virulent pathogen that causes the disease tularemia, or "rabbit fever," was weaponized during past world wars and is considered a potential bioweapon. [More]
Novel computer tool predicts impact of short-course treatment regimen against MDR-TB

Novel computer tool predicts impact of short-course treatment regimen against MDR-TB

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a computer simulation that helps predict under which circumstances a new short-course treatment regimen for drug-resistant tuberculosis could substantially reduce the global incidence and spread of the disease. [More]
Surgeon General report reveals increasing rate of electronic cigarette use among adolescents

Surgeon General report reveals increasing rate of electronic cigarette use among adolescents

The United States Surgeon General recently issued a report that adolescents' use of electronic cigarettes has more than tripled since 2011. As recently as 2010, e-cigarettes were rare, but in 2015, 40 percent of high school students said they had used e-cigarettes at least once and 16 percent reported that they used such products in the past 30 days. [More]
Lifestyle choices and obesity linked to lower life expectancy

Lifestyle choices and obesity linked to lower life expectancy

For the first time in two decades, the life expectancy of Americans declined slightly, and the overall death rate rose, according to a report from the National Center for Health Statistics. [More]
Later high school start times linked to positive outcomes among teens

Later high school start times linked to positive outcomes among teens

A review of the scientific literature by a workgroup composed of representatives from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sleep Research Society, and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine found that later high school start times are associated with positive outcomes among teens, including longer weekday sleep durations and reduced vehicular accident rates. [More]
Childhood diarrhea from pathogens more common than previously thought?

Childhood diarrhea from pathogens more common than previously thought?

The number of cases of childhood diarrhea, and its mortality toll of 500,000 per year, has not changed. Now, however, we can explain ~90% of the cases to specific pathogens. We can assign responsibility. [More]
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