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Existing non-antibiotic therapeutic drugs could help combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

Existing non-antibiotic therapeutic drugs could help combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

The rise of antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens is an increasingly global threat to public health. In the United States alone antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens kill thousands every year. [More]
TGen scientists trace likely origins, dispersal of fungus that causes Valley Fever

TGen scientists trace likely origins, dispersal of fungus that causes Valley Fever

Using the latest in genomic analysis technologies, scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute have tracked the likely origins and dispersal of the fungus that causes Valley Fever, according to a study published today in the journal mBio, the premiere journal for reporting high impact microbiological research. [More]
New mouse model to aid in development of antiviral compounds, vaccines against Zika virus

New mouse model to aid in development of antiviral compounds, vaccines against Zika virus

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine have developed one of the first mouse models for the study of Zika virus. The model will allow researchers to better understand how the virus causes disease and aid in the development of antiviral compounds and vaccines. [More]
Researchers reveal that numerous health websites mislead public on risks of nicotine products

Researchers reveal that numerous health websites mislead public on risks of nicotine products

Millions of people visit the websites of the Mayo Clinic, American Cancer Society and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among others, seeking authoritative health information. But are they receiving it? [More]
Researchers focus on novel target to treat bacterial infection

Researchers focus on novel target to treat bacterial infection

Bacterial infection takes hold in the body when a pathogenic microorganism delivers toxins to healthy cells. One way bacteria accomplish this is by releasing vesicles, which act as tiny envelopes transporting toxins and other virulence factors to host cells. These toxins allow the bacteria to "make themselves at home" in cells. [More]
Georgetown researchers report first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in HIV-positive individual

Georgetown researchers report first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in HIV-positive individual

Georgetown University researchers are reporting the first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual. The finding in a 71-year-old man triggers a realization about HIV survivors now reaching the age when Alzheimer's risk begins to escalate. [More]
Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. [More]
Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Superbugs – or to give them their correct name, antibiotic resistant bacteria – arise on repeated exposure to antibiotics. In any population of bacteria there will be a few that are antibiotic resistant (approximately 1 in 100 million bacteria). If these bacteria are allowed to grow and multiply, an antibiotic resistant infection results. [More]
Coordinated efforts could prevent spread of CRE infection in health care facilities

Coordinated efforts could prevent spread of CRE infection in health care facilities

A simulation of how the so-called "superbug" carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) might spread among health care facilities found that coordinated efforts prevented more than 75 percent of the often-severe infections that would have otherwise occurred over a five-year period. [More]
Researchers analyze post-Ebola syndrome survivors to improve ongoing treatment

Researchers analyze post-Ebola syndrome survivors to improve ongoing treatment

Researchers from the University of Liverpool and the King's Sierra Leone Partnership are to present new findings into post-Ebola syndrome at a major European conference this week. [More]
Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Despite having policies in place to prevent infections, staff at outpatient care facilities fail to follow recommendations for hand hygiene 37 percent of the time, and for safe injection practices 33 percent of the time, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
New research demonstrates effectiveness of six-step hand-hygiene technique for reducing bacteria

New research demonstrates effectiveness of six-step hand-hygiene technique for reducing bacteria

New research demonstrates that the six-step hand-hygiene technique recommended by the World Health Organization is superior to a three-step method suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in reducing bacteria on healthcare workers' hands. The study was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

In humans, cholera is among the world's most deadly diseases, killing as many as 140,000 persons a year, according to World Health Organization statistics. But in aquatic environments far away from humans, the same bacterium attacks neighboring microbes with a toxic spear - and often steals DNA from other microorganisms to expand its own capabilities. [More]
First-ever immature antibody found in immune molecules may help combat HIV

First-ever immature antibody found in immune molecules may help combat HIV

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and collaborating institutions have described the first-ever immature or “teenage” antibody found in a powerful class of immune molecules effective against HIV. [More]
Monetary incentives aid smoking cessation among pregnant, post-partum women

Monetary incentives aid smoking cessation among pregnant, post-partum women

Smoking during pregnancy is the leading preventable cause of poor pregnancy outcomes. Studies further indicate that in-utero smoke exposure contributes to respiratory and cardiac illnesses later in life. [More]
ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

ADHD stimulant drugs may lower bone density in children and adolescents

Children and teenagers who take stimulant drugs to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their peers who do not take these medications, a new study finds. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in U.S. unchanged, finds new CDC report

Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in U.S. unchanged, finds new CDC report

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) largely unchanged from two years ago, at one in 68 children (or 1.46 percent). [More]
FDA announces availability of investigational test to screen donated blood for Zika virus

FDA announces availability of investigational test to screen donated blood for Zika virus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced the availability of an investigational test to screen blood donations for Zika virus. The screening test may be used under an investigational new drug application (IND) for screening donated blood in areas with active mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus. [More]
Opioids could be dangerous, deadly at high doses

Opioids could be dangerous, deadly at high doses

Most people know that heroin is a dangerous drug, but its cousins, the legal, pharmaceutical opioids, such as codeine or hydrocodone, must be safe, right?Not so fast.Opioids—which include the illegal drug heroin as well as prescription medications, including hydrocodone (such as Vicodin), oxycodone (such as OxyContin and Percocet), morphine and codeine—can be dangerous, even deadly, at high doses. [More]
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