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Cepheid gets FDA clearance to market Xpert Norovirus

Cepheid gets FDA clearance to market Xpert Norovirus

Cepheid today announced it has received clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration to market Xpert Norovirus, a qualitative in vitro diagnostic test for expeditious identification and differentiation of Noroviruses genogroup I (GI) and genogroup II (GII). [More]
Unsafe infant bedding increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Unsafe infant bedding increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infants are placed to sleep with bedding that increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, despite recommendations against the practice, report researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions. [More]
Prevalence of adult smoking is falling in US

Prevalence of adult smoking is falling in US

The proportion of US adults who smoke has dropped by around 3% (from 2005 to 2013) according to a study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [More]
New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to UTMB is approximately $2.5 million. [More]
Preconception care can significantly lower adverse birth outcomes in diabetic women

Preconception care can significantly lower adverse birth outcomes in diabetic women

Pregnant women with diabetes are at an increased risk for many adverse birth outcomes. Preconception care (PCC) can significantly lower these risks by helping pregnant mothers with diabetes control their glucose levels, resulting in healthier babies and less money spent on complicated deliveries and lifelong medical complications. [More]
Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Navigating through the maze of health and medical services can be challenging for parents of children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A new resource is now available for caregivers, health professionals and, especially, parents. [More]
University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Excessive alcohol intake is not just the realm of alcoholics

Excessive alcohol intake is not just the realm of alcoholics

Excessive alcohol consumption, which is responsible for 88,000 deaths annually in the US, is commonly assumed to occur in people who are alcohol-dependent. However, of these deaths only 3,700 were due to alcohol dependence. A study published yesterday found that in 9 out 10 cases, adults who drink too much alcohol are not alcoholics or alcohol-dependent. [More]
MUHC study examines effect of regular re-evaluation of antibiotic use on cost, C. difficile infection rates

MUHC study examines effect of regular re-evaluation of antibiotic use on cost, C. difficile infection rates

Resistance to antibiotics is an important health concern that affects both the spread of infections, like Clostridium difficile, and the medication budget. Researchers at the McGill University Health Centre examined the effectiveness of adopting an antibiotic "time-out" during treatment, which involves regularly re-evaluating the treatment strategy as the clinical situation evolves. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Tdap vaccination during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery

Among approximately 26,000 women, receipt of the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of preterm delivery or small-for-gestational-age birth or with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, although a small increased risk of being diagnosed with chorioamnionitis (an inflammation of the membranes that surround the fetus) was observed, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Five simple steps to reduce type-2 diabetes

Five simple steps to reduce type-2 diabetes

There are 29 million U.S. adults diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 1 in 3 diagnosed as pre-diabetic. Diabetes is a serious disease which can result in serious health complications including nerve damage, vision loss, heart disease, and kidney failure, to name a few. [More]
Two new oral medications post-transplant is safe, beneficial for patients with hepatitis C

Two new oral medications post-transplant is safe, beneficial for patients with hepatitis C

All patients with hepatitis C who receive a liver transplant will eventually infect their new livers. These transplanted organs then require anti-viral treatment before they become severely damaged. But traditional post-transplant hepatitis C therapy can take up to a year, is potentially toxic and can lead to organ rejection. [More]
Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

Survey: Majority of U.S. adult women do not believe that they are up to date on vaccinations

A national survey from Rite Aid and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases reveals that the majority of adult women living in the United States do not believe they are up to date on vaccinations to protect against many preventable diseases. [More]
Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, once considered a high-risk procedure, carries a complication and mortality rate comparable to some of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in America, including gallbladder surgery, appendectomy, and total knee replacement, according to new research from the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute. [More]
Study shows strong correlation between low-calorie sweetener consumption, healthy lifestyles

Study shows strong correlation between low-calorie sweetener consumption, healthy lifestyles

New research from the University of Washington examining data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of more than 22,000 people has found that consumers of foods and beverages made with no, low, and reduced-calorie sweeteners have better quality diets and are more likely to be physically active. [More]

Study shows racial disparity in autism identification

The number of children diagnosed with autism has increased in recent years, but a new study co-authored by a University of Kansas professor shows that while the number of students with autism increased in every state from 2000 to 2007, black and Hispanic children were significantly underrepresented. [More]
Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Fall in the United States means residents in most of the country will see fewer mosquitoes and less risk of the diseases they spread. However, the chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean and Central and South American countries continues to spread with no sign of slowing down. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the painful mosquito-borne disease will likely continue to infect travelers to the region during the rest of this year and beyond. [More]
Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Despite evidence that cervical cancer screening saves lives, about eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened. [More]
Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Patients with obesity take significantly fewer medications after weight-loss surgery than their non-surgical counterparts, and end up spending 22.4 percent less on drugs for diabetes and heart disease after four years, according to new research. [More]