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Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

New research published by the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring confirms the connection between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cognitive impairment - in this case, among those who helped with search, rescue and cleanup efforts following the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks. [More]
Adults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries

Adults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries

Research examining adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who participated in rehabilitation showed that they were twice as likely to die from an unintentional injury that occurred following their TBI. [More]
Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV has announced the submission of a Type II variation application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), seeking to broaden the existing marketing authorisation for the immunotherapy DARZALEX® (daratumumab) to include treatment of adult patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The expanded indication is based on daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide (an immmunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone, or bortezomib (a PI) and dexamethasone. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
Study reveals disadvantaged neighborhood puts teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese

Study reveals disadvantaged neighborhood puts teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese

A new Kaiser Permanente study found an increased risk for becoming overweight or obese among normal-weight 18-year-olds who lived in neighborhoods with lower education or income levels. [More]
Many parents support HPV vaccine school-entry requirements with opt-out provisions

Many parents support HPV vaccine school-entry requirements with opt-out provisions

Requiring students to get vaccinated against the human papillomavirus, or HPV, to enter school could prevent many cancers linked to the virus, but University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that many parents only support such requirements with opt-out provisions that could make the laws less effective. [More]
Large emergency vaccination campaigns to curb yellow fever outbreak in Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo

Large emergency vaccination campaigns to curb yellow fever outbreak in Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo

One of the largest emergency vaccination campaigns ever attempted in Africa will start in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo this week as WHO and partners work to curb a yellow fever outbreak that has killed more than 400 people and sickened thousands more. [More]
Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin allergy testing: an interview with Dr. Eric Macy

Penicillin was one of the first antibiotics developed and has saved millions of lives. First used in the early 1940s, penicillin is still one of the most widely used and least toxic family of antibiotics. [More]
Study finds potential gap in access to fertility services by LGBT persons

Study finds potential gap in access to fertility services by LGBT persons

With the recent one-year anniversary of Obergefell vs Hodges--the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage--researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have published a report that identifies unequal online availability of educational materials regarding assisted reproductive technology (ART). [More]
Latinos age more slowly than other ethnic groups, reveals UCLA study

Latinos age more slowly than other ethnic groups, reveals UCLA study

A UCLA study is the first to show that Latinos age at a slower rate than other ethnic groups. The findings, published in the current issue of Genome Biology, may one day help scientists understand how to slow the aging process for everyone. [More]
Study reveals 70% of tourists express concerns about Zika risk in Florida

Study reveals 70% of tourists express concerns about Zika risk in Florida

With more than 20 cases of non-travel related Zika reported in South Florida, tourists express more concern with travel to the state but still plan to come, a new study shows. [More]
Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV, and providing therapy for both illnesses simultaneously saves lives - according to new guidelines on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB developed jointly by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Infectious Diseases Society of America. [More]
Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

A bird species that does a poor job spreading West Nile virus (WNV) but is particularly likely to get mosquito bites may explain why human infections with the disease are relatively uncommon in Atlanta, Georgia—despite evidence of high rates of virus circulating in the local bird population, according to a new study published online today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [More]
Miami gynecologist calls on travelers to follow CDC guidelines while maintaining proper perspective on Zika risk

Miami gynecologist calls on travelers to follow CDC guidelines while maintaining proper perspective on Zika risk

Dr. Jason James, Chief of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baptist Hospital in Miami, called on travelers to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines while maintaining perspective on the risk of Zika for those who are not pregnant. [More]
Wolters Kluwer launches Zika Resource Portal to provide up-to-date information on rapidly spreading virus

Wolters Kluwer launches Zika Resource Portal to provide up-to-date information on rapidly spreading virus

The Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry, has launched the Zika Resource Portal, a single point of access to trusted clinical knowledge and current information to help healthcare professionals worldwide stay up-to-date on the rapidly spreading virus. [More]
Appealing new flavors contribute to alarming trends in youth consumption of e-cigarettes

Appealing new flavors contribute to alarming trends in youth consumption of e-cigarettes

Currently, we are experiencing a new phenomenon with youth consumption of e-cigarettes all around the United States. For the second consecutive year, e-cigarettes were the most popular product among youth. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
GSK launches educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis

GSK launches educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis

GSK today launched an educational campaign to help raise awareness of meningitis, a rare but potentially deadly disease. [More]
Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

Increased treatment for HCV in Rhode Island could help eradicate disease by 2030

A new Brown University study projects that increasing the number of Rhode Islanders treated every year for hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) to about 2,000 by 2020 would reduce cases by 90 percent and prevent more than 70 percent of expected liver-related deaths in the state by 2030. [More]
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