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Once-weekly Trulicity 0.75 mg shows promising results in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes

Once-weekly Trulicity 0.75 mg shows promising results in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes

Results from a new study of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes showed once-weekly Trulicity 0.75 mg provided greater hemoglobin A1c (A1C) reduction compared to once-daily Victoza 0.9 mg after 52 weeks of treatment. Eli Lilly and Company will present these data at the 75th American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions in Boston. [More]
Medical experts call for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods

Medical experts call for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods

Unreliable estrogen measurements have had a negative impact on the treatment of and research into many hormone-related cancers and chronic conditions. To improve patient care, a panel of medical experts has called for accurate, standardized estrogen testing methods in a statement published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Sexual violence against children significantly higher in low- and middle-income countries

Sexual violence against children significantly higher in low- and middle-income countries

Sexual violence against children is a significant problem in many low- and middle-income countries. At least 25 percent of females and 10 percent of males experienced some form of childhood sexual violence in the majority of seven countries studied, according to findings from the Violence Against Children Surveys (VACS) released today in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
New study reports that poor sleep habits increase pain in knee OA

New study reports that poor sleep habits increase pain in knee OA

A new study reports that patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who have poor sleep habits display greater central sensitization--an amplification of clinical pain. Findings published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, further show OA patients who catastrophize--consumed by thoughts of pain--had increased central sensitization that was associated with greater clinical pain. [More]
Better treatment, prevention strategies still needed for opportunistic infections related to AIDS

Better treatment, prevention strategies still needed for opportunistic infections related to AIDS

Although treatment advances have dramatically reduced deaths from opportunistic infections related to AIDS, a new study drawing on 30 years of data from more than 20,000 patients in San Francisco suggests there is still ample room to improve. About a third--35 percent--of AIDS patients diagnosed with their first opportunistic infection from 1997 to 2012 in that city died within five years, according to the study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
Elusys’ Anthim BLA to treat inhalational anthrax accepted for review by the FDA

Elusys’ Anthim BLA to treat inhalational anthrax accepted for review by the FDA

Elusys Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for filing and review its Biologics License Application for Anthim® (obiltoxaximab) for the treatment and prevention of inhalational anthrax, a top bioterror threat which was submitted on March 20, 2015. Anthim is a candidate for future acquisition into the Strategic National Stockpile, the U.S. government's repository of critical medical supplies for biowarfare preparedness. [More]
Pennsylvania physicians urge residents to take precautions against bug bites, bee stings

Pennsylvania physicians urge residents to take precautions against bug bites, bee stings

For many people, bug bites and bee stings aren't a big deal beyond a small irritation. But for some, it could mean the start of a painful - possibly long-term or even deadly - experience. [More]
Glucose Health Natural Blood Sugar Maintenance product for patients with Type-2 diabetes

Glucose Health Natural Blood Sugar Maintenance product for patients with Type-2 diabetes

Healthcare professionals now have a new OTC (over- the-counter) product designed for the 2 in 5 Americans the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now estimates will develop Type-2 diabetes in their lifetime – Glucose Health Natural Blood Sugar Maintenance. [More]
Differences in brain expression of RORA protein levels may lead to sex bias in autism

Differences in brain expression of RORA protein levels may lead to sex bias in autism

George Washington University researcher Valerie Hu, Ph.D., has found an important sex-dependent difference in the level of RORA protein in brain tissues of males and females. Specifically, females without autism have a slightly higher level of RORA in the frontal cortex of the brain than males without autism, while the levels of the protein are comparably lower in the brain of both males and females with autism. [More]
Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Warring armies use a variety of tactics as they struggle to gain the upper hand. Among their tricks is to attack with a decoy force that occupies the defenders while an unseen force launches a separate attack that the defenders fail to notice. [More]
Actavis creates collaborative program to improve care for patients with multidrug-resistant infections

Actavis creates collaborative program to improve care for patients with multidrug-resistant infections

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company committed to infectious disease treatment innovation, today announced the creation of SHARE ID (Sharing Hospital data to Advance Research and Enhance patient care in Infectious Diseases), a collaborative program to leverage real-world data to advance the delivery and effectiveness of care for patients with serious infections due to antibiotic-resistant pathogens. [More]
Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

An international team including scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has identified the molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells. [More]
Toronto researchers design simple chip for faster, easier detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Toronto researchers design simple chip for faster, easier detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

We live in fear of 'superbugs': infectious bacteria that don't respond to treatment by antibiotics, and can turn a routine hospital stay into a nightmare. A 2015 Health Canada report estimates that superbugs have already cost Canadians $1 billion, and are a "serious and growing issue." Each year two million people in the U.S. contract antibiotic-resistant infections, and at least 23,000 people die as a direct result. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Food safety awareness is key to understanding the food safety issues on the horizon, and clinicians at hospitals and doctors' offices play a key role in ensuring consumers are aware of the threats of foodborne illness, said the University of Georgia's Michael Doyle. [More]
Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

An Australian researcher has helped identify the kind of human trial that is most effective for testing Ebola vaccines. [More]
Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

Study shows significant benefits of microclinics in rural Kenyan HIV patients

A team led by researchers from UC San Francisco, Organic Health Response, and Microclinic International is reporting results of a study that showed significant benefits of microclinics -- an innovative intervention that mobilized rural Kenyan HIV patients' informal social networks to support their staying in care. [More]
Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can help improve outcomes after major urologic surgery

Quitting smoking can lead to a significant improvement in outcomes after major urologic surgery. These new data and their impact on urologic surgery will be highlighted by study authors during a special press conference at the 110th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. [More]
New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

Army scientists working to support the Ebola virus outbreak response in West Africa have established the first genomic surveillance capability in Liberia, enabling them to monitor genetic changes in the virus within one week of sample collection. An article describing their work was recently published ahead of print in the online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
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