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Views on Ebola: Try to keep 'an even keel'; who's in charge of fighting a pandemic?

Views on Ebola: Try to keep 'an even keel'; who's in charge of fighting a pandemic?

Understandably, the specter of such a dangerous disease in the United States has bred fear. But it is remarkable how some public figures are inflaming that fear. Commentator Rush Limbaugh took flight on Tuesday, saying on the radio that "I don't think anybody involved with Ebola knows what they're doing. I don't care if it's the WHO or the Centers for Disease Control, I don't think anybody knows what they're doing." This was an unfounded rant that can only deepen public disquiet. [More]
Second Dallas health worker has Ebola; CDC announces 'more robust' response

Second Dallas health worker has Ebola; CDC announces 'more robust' response

Seventy-six health-care workers who helped treat Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan are now being monitored for potential Ebola exposure. Forty-eight others are being watched because they had contact with Duncan. [More]
CDC re-evaluating safety procedures after nurse contracts Ebola

CDC re-evaluating safety procedures after nurse contracts Ebola

Thomas Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, announces that the agency will look again at the protocols for hospitals to see if more training or equipment is necessary to protect health care workers and the public. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Viewpoints: Ebola myths; Sen. McCain's 'opportunistic alarmism'; Gov. Jindal on CDC's misspent resources

Hubris is the greatest danger in wealthy countries -; a sort of smug assumption that advanced technologies and emergency-preparedness plans guarantee that Ebola and other germs will not spread. It was hubris that left Toronto's top hospitals battling SARS in 2003, long after the virus was conquered in poorer Vietnam. It was hubris that led the World Health Assembly in 2013 to cut the WHO's outbreak-response budget in favor of more programs to treat cancer and heart disease. [More]
Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis by researchers at Duke Medicine shows mental stress may tax women's hearts more than men's. [More]
New guideline makes recommendations about treating, managing distal muscular dystrophy

New guideline makes recommendations about treating, managing distal muscular dystrophy

A new guideline from the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine and the American Academy of Neurology recommends guidance on how doctors should evaluate the full picture—from symptoms, family history, and ethnicity, to a physical exam and certain lab test results—in order to determine what genetic tests may best diagnose a person's subtype of limb-girdle or distal muscular dystrophy. [More]
Texas health worker contracts Ebola, fueling questions about training and preparedness

Texas health worker contracts Ebola, fueling questions about training and preparedness

The case, the first in which the disease was transmitted in the U.S., raises questions about whether regular hospitals around the country are ready to safely deal with the virus. [More]
Research roundup: Older consumers' spending on health care; hospital leaders' views of reporting quality

Research roundup: Older consumers' spending on health care; hospital leaders' views of reporting quality

In 2011, households with at least one member between ages 50 and 64 spent 8 percent of their total budget on health items, compared with 19 percent for those age 85 or over. [More]
Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

Pneumococcal vaccine prevents illness, reduces severe antibiotic-resistant infections in young children

The pneumococcal vaccine recommended for young children not only prevents illness and death, but also has dramatically reduced severe antibiotic-resistant infections, suggests nationwide research being presented at IDWeek 2014. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
Viewpoints: Walmart and Obamacare; negative views continue of health law; Ebola preparedness

Viewpoints: Walmart and Obamacare; negative views continue of health law; Ebola preparedness

Walmart announced today that as of the beginning of next year it will be dropping health insurance for 30,000 employees who work less than 30 hours per week. Many liberals will react to the news by saying that it's just a profit-hungry corporation once again screwing over its employees. Conservatives are likely to say that this just shows what a mess Obamacare has created and why it should be repealed (Paul Waldman, 10/8). [More]
Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Antibiotic stewardship programs reduce length of stay and hospital readmission in children

Hospitalized children go home sooner and are less likely to be readmitted when the hospital has an antibiotic stewardship program that's dedicated to controlling antibiotic prescriptions and treatment, according to a study being presented at IDWeek 2014-. The study is the first to show the benefits of such programs on children's health. [More]
Temple researchers to create awareness about healthy diet among low-income Asian Americans

Temple researchers to create awareness about healthy diet among low-income Asian Americans

Although low-income Asian Americans are at a high risk for diabetes, hypertension, heart attack and stroke, they are under a misconception that their diet is healthy and not a risk factor for these chronic diseases. [More]
TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University for a test that can detect — and assist in the treatment of — the H1N1 pandemic flu strain. [More]
Survey finds prevalence of antimicrobial-drug use in U.S. hospitals

Survey finds prevalence of antimicrobial-drug use in U.S. hospitals

A one-day prevalence survey of 183 hospitals found that approximately 50 percent of hospitalized patients included in the survey were receiving antimicrobial drugs, and that about half of these patients were receiving 2 or more antimicrobial drugs, according to a study in the October 8 JAMA, a theme issue on infectious disease. Most antimicrobial use was for infection treatment. [More]
LLNL scientists issued patent for producing antimicrobial compounds to fight superbugs

LLNL scientists issued patent for producing antimicrobial compounds to fight superbugs

Superbugs, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, have been on the rise since antibiotics were first introduced 80 years ago. That's because these germ-fighting agents have lost their punch from being overprescribed and misused, allowing bacteria pathogens to develop immunities against them. [More]
Sugar consumption linked to memory problems, brain inflammation in adolescent rats

Sugar consumption linked to memory problems, brain inflammation in adolescent rats

Studying rats as model subjects, scientists found that adolescents were at an increased risk of suffering negative health effects from sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. [More]
Obama administration announces plans to step up airport screening for Ebola virus

Obama administration announces plans to step up airport screening for Ebola virus

Though President Barack Obama did not say exactly how screening procedures would change, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said officials would consider a variety of options. [More]
Free online service launched to alert U.S. residents about new potential Ebola cases in nearby area

Free online service launched to alert U.S. residents about new potential Ebola cases in nearby area

EbolaScan.com launched today, bringing the power of local online alerts to U.S. residents concerned about new potential Ebola cases in their area. The free service, available via the web, tablets, and smartphones, alerts people with information about the latest reported cases nearby. [More]

Correcting flaws in the Ebola response

How hospital and health workers react to suspected cases of Ebola going forward is the subject of much scrutiny. But, even as public health and many elected officials urge calm, some potential 2016 presidential candidates say President Obama isn't doing enough to keep the disease out of the U.S. [More]