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Zika threat to Olympics attendees? An interview with Prof. Eskild Petersen

Zika threat to Olympics attendees? An interview with Prof. Eskild Petersen

The risk in terms of the Olympics, especially for travelling populations remains low – with the notable exception of pregnant women. [More]

Alternative policy for Ebola entry screening at U.S. airports

As of January 31, 2016, a total of 28,639 cases and 11,316 deaths have been attributed to Ebola, figures that are assumed to significantly underestimate the actual scope of the 2014 Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever outbreak in West Africa. In the United States, there were also two imported cases and two locally acquired cases reported in September/October 2014. [More]
Yellow fever outbreak in Angola kills 178 people

Yellow fever outbreak in Angola kills 178 people

Angola is grappling with a yellow fever outbreak, which has infected more than 450 people and killed 178 – the first epidemic of the disease to hit the country in 30 years. [More]
Microneedle-embedded patch delivers cancer immunotherapy directly to melanoma

Microneedle-embedded patch delivers cancer immunotherapy directly to melanoma

Biomedical engineering researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to deliver cancer immunotherapy treatment directly to the site of melanoma skin cancer. In animal studies, the technique more effectively targeted melanoma than other immunotherapy treatments. [More]
Guardian system can predict risk of dangerous diseases

Guardian system can predict risk of dangerous diseases

If an infectious disease outbreak or an attack using an agent such as anthrax were to occur in Chicago, it most likely first will be noticed in emergency rooms throughout the city. Swift identification of the cause of an incoming patients' illness could be crucial to public health and safety personnel being able to intervene in time to save lives. [More]
DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

The cost of treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) could be cut up to 50 percent if mathematical models are used to predict when patients can safely stop taking direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medication, according to a new study by researchers at Loyola University Health System and Loyola University Chicago [More]
Competition between mixed malaria parasite strains could influence drug resistance

Competition between mixed malaria parasite strains could influence drug resistance

Scientists have documented for the first time how competition among different malaria parasite strains in human hosts could influence the spread of drug resistance. [More]
TGen investigators help track hypervirulent strep outbreak in southwestern U.S.

TGen investigators help track hypervirulent strep outbreak in southwestern U.S.

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) has helped state, local and tribal health officials identify an outbreak of "hypervirulent" strep bacteria in the American Southwest. [More]
Advanced genomic sequencing tracks deadly blood infection in cancer patients

Advanced genomic sequencing tracks deadly blood infection in cancer patients

The Translational Genomics Research Institute, working with international investigators, have discovered the source of a potential deadly blood infection in more than 50 South American cancer patients. [More]
Study assesses acceptability of alternative drug to prevent malaria among pregnant women in Kenya

Study assesses acceptability of alternative drug to prevent malaria among pregnant women in Kenya

Researchers at LSTM, working with colleagues at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention USA, the Kenya Medical Research Institute, and from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, have completed a study to assess the acceptability among pregnant women and health providers in Kenya of a new drug as an alternative to the standard drug used to prevent malaria in pregnancy. [More]
Penn study calls on physicians to avoid over-prescribing opioids for surgical patients

Penn study calls on physicians to avoid over-prescribing opioids for surgical patients

Physicians are prescribing more opioid painkillers than ever before to patients undergoing common surgeries, according to new research from the department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
AMP disappointed as FDA takes enforcement action against physicians for Zika virus test

AMP disappointed as FDA takes enforcement action against physicians for Zika virus test

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, professional society serving molecular diagnostics professionals, is very concerned and disappointed to see the FDA taking enforcement action against the physicians at Texas Children's Hospital and Houston Methodist Hospital for their laboratory developed procedure (LDP) for Zika virus, which was designed to identify virus-specific RNA sequences in a large metropolitan area. [More]
Conflicting expectations result in failure of young girls completing HPV vaccinations series

Conflicting expectations result in failure of young girls completing HPV vaccinations series

Conflicting expectations between parents and medical providers about who is responsible for scheduling follow-up appointments is resulting in a failure of young girls completing the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination series, according to a new study led by Boston Medical Center researchers. [More]
Early life exposure to lead can alter gut microbiota, contribute to increased body weight in adulthood

Early life exposure to lead can alter gut microbiota, contribute to increased body weight in adulthood

Exposure to lead during early development can alter the the gut microbiota, increasing the chances for obesity in adulthood, researchers from the University of Michigan School of Public Health have found. [More]
Use of OTC medication not always a smart decision for yeast infection

Use of OTC medication not always a smart decision for yeast infection

Itching, burning, redness—a yeast infection can be a total pain. While they aren't life-threatening, yeast infections are irritating—both physically and mentally. So, when undesirable symptoms appear 'down there,' should you consult your physician or self diagnose and treat with over-the-counter medications? [More]
Alcohol worst of all drugs that affect fetal health

Alcohol worst of all drugs that affect fetal health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention set off a firestorm of controversy this month when they suggested that women stop drinking alcohol if they are trying to get pregnant, or could get pregnant. Some people took this advice as the CDC prioritizing hypothetical, yet-to-be-conceived children over real women, which has brought up a number of issues from female autonomy to access to birth control—but how clear is the science about what causes fetal alcohol syndrome and related fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. [More]
Valley Hospital, Holy Name Medical Center collaborate to defeat C. difficile

Valley Hospital, Holy Name Medical Center collaborate to defeat C. difficile

The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, and Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck, NJ, are collaborating to defeat a common foe: a dangerous drug-resistant bacterium called Clostridium difficile, or C. difficile. [More]
Antidepressants may play role in dental implant failure

Antidepressants may play role in dental implant failure

Antidepressants, commonly used to treat anxiety, pain and other disorders, may play a role in dental implant failure, according to a new pilot study by University at Buffalo researchers. [More]
SC Johnson delivers over 60,000 units of OFF! insect repellent to help protect families from Zika virus

SC Johnson delivers over 60,000 units of OFF! insect repellent to help protect families from Zika virus

Today, as part of its commitment to provide at least $15 million to help protect families from the Zika virus, SC Johnson announced a donation of more than 60,000 cans and bottles of OFF! personal insect repellent to the CDC Foundation, in partnership with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria

Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria

Malaria killed about 440,000 people - mostly young children - last year, but a new drug candidate discovered at Rutgers may help fight the long-dreaded disease. [More]
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