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Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Hospitals in which the administration of epinephrine to patients whose hearts have stopped is delayed beyond five minutes have significantly lower survival rates of those patients, a new study led by a cardiologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center finds. [More]
RDT to preview innovative Tempus ALS defibrillator monitor at MEDICA 2016

RDT to preview innovative Tempus ALS defibrillator monitor at MEDICA 2016

RDT, a leading provider of pre-hospital care solutions, will be previewing its Tempus ALS™ defibrillator monitor at MEDICA 2016. [More]
Gaumard to exhibit new OMNI 2 touch-screen wireless interface at AHA’s Scientific Sessions

Gaumard to exhibit new OMNI 2 touch-screen wireless interface at AHA’s Scientific Sessions

Gaumard Scientific Company will demonstrate how it is transforming CPR training with value-priced simulators and skills trainers into an intuitive tap-and-go experience when the new OMNI 2 touch-screen wireless interface is demonstrated at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions, November 13-15 in booth 2045 at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center. [More]
New clinical study to examine safety and outcomes of body cooling in cardiac arrest patients

New clinical study to examine safety and outcomes of body cooling in cardiac arrest patients

The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland has opened a clinical trial to study whether rapidly cooling the body temperature of patients whose hearts stop due to massive blood loss will give surgeons extra time to find and repair injuries, and in turn, help save their lives. [More]
Study finds incomplete and ambiguous POLST forms in emergency care for elderly patients

Study finds incomplete and ambiguous POLST forms in emergency care for elderly patients

In recent years, Physicians' Orders for Life Sustaining Treatments (POLST) forms have been seen as an important way to honor the end-of-life wishes of frail elderly or terminally ill patients who cannot speak for themselves. [More]
Many parents support expansion of health education in schools, new survey reveals

Many parents support expansion of health education in schools, new survey reveals

Teaching kids about drugs, alcohol and sex appears to be less controversial than ever before with the majority of parents in a new poll saying schools should and do teach these subjects. [More]
AACN Practice Alert offers detailed checklist for aspiration prevention in tube-fed patients

AACN Practice Alert offers detailed checklist for aspiration prevention in tube-fed patients

Aspiration among critically ill patients may often be subtle or even silent, but that doesn't mean it's insignificant. [More]
Vigilant monitoring by parents, caregivers could help prevent drowning among children

Vigilant monitoring by parents, caregivers could help prevent drowning among children

More children are coming to hospital emergency departments this summer for drownings or near-drownings, including at Penn State Children's Hospital, where staff members say they have seen more cases recently than they can recall in several years. [More]
Physicians may need to allow sufficient time before predicting outcomes in comatose cardiac arrest patients

Physicians may need to allow sufficient time before predicting outcomes in comatose cardiac arrest patients

Physicians may be drawing conclusions too soon about survival outcomes of patients who suffered a cardiac arrest outside the hospital. [More]
Study assesses prevalence of delirium among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia

Study assesses prevalence of delirium among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia

A study in the American Journal of Critical Care found a remarkably high prevalence of delirium in a small cohort of critically ill patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. [More]
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC supports parents’ presence with children during resuscitation

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC supports parents’ presence with children during resuscitation

Inviting parents to the bedside while their child receives CPR is supported by professional associations, joint position and policy statements, and clinical practice guidelines, but hospitals often find that putting those recommendations into practice requires more than a new policy. [More]
Tips to keep children safe at kiddie pools

Tips to keep children safe at kiddie pools

Big backyard swimming pools aren't the only source of drownings. Those seemingly safe small, inflatable "kiddie" pools can be just as dangerous. [More]
Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Administering heart resuscitation drugs to patients whose cardiac arrest is witnessed at the time of the attack can improve survival, but needs to be done through an IV line rather than directly into bone marrow as is more commonly done by paramedics, a new study involving UT Southwestern Medical Center emergency physicians and Dallas-Fort Worth Emergency Medical Services agencies reveals. [More]
Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Paramedics often give heart rhythm stabilizing drugs to patients who are suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when they fail to regain a stable heart rhythm after electrical shock treatment. [More]
Confronting the global concern of pressure ulcers

Confronting the global concern of pressure ulcers

Almost 700,000 people in the UK are affected by pressure ulcers every year, making this global issue a substantial concern for health professionals and care units worldwide. [More]
New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

The number of people living in high-rise buildings in rising, but along with the convenience and panoramic views of a downtown condo comes a risk: a new study found that survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives. [More]
American College of Cardiology to honor LA BioMed researcher with Distinguished Teacher Award

American College of Cardiology to honor LA BioMed researcher with Distinguished Teacher Award

John Michael Criley, MD, a Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute researcher, will receive the 2016 Distinguished Teacher Award from the American College of Cardiology on April 4 at the organization's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago, IL. [More]
Emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve cardiac arrest survival rates

Emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve cardiac arrest survival rates

Although survival rates for people who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital are extremely low in most places, emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve survival rates and functional outcomes in any community and urge additional federal funding for cardiac resuscitation research in an editorial published online last Wednesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("IOM Says Times to Act to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival ... Here's How"). [More]
Sedentary behaviour worsens health of heart disease patients

Sedentary behaviour worsens health of heart disease patients

Patients with heart disease who sit a lot have worse health even if they exercise, reveals research from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention. [More]

Study compares new cardiopulmonary resuscitation with standard CPR in cardiac arrest

Continuous chest compression, touted as the new way to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, was not an improvement over standard CPR, according to findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine today. The University of Alabama at Birmingham was one of eight United States and Canadian universities involved in the study, the largest such study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest ever conducted. [More]
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