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New study raises possibility of therapeutic intervention for brain blood vessel disease

New study raises possibility of therapeutic intervention for brain blood vessel disease

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are the most common cause of stroke in young people. These malformations also known as Cavernomas are present in 0.1-0.5% of the population, with about 60% causing symptoms. Currently there is no drug treatment available for CCM. [More]
Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Middle-aged black women have higher levels of a protein in their blood associated with a predictor of heart disease than their white counterparts, even after other factors, such as obesity, are taken into consideration, according to a study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine. [More]
Blood test detects mild traumatic brain injury for up to a week

Blood test detects mild traumatic brain injury for up to a week

Researchers report findings of a blood biomarker that consistently detects mild to moderate traumatic brain injury for up to 7 days and quantifies the degree of damage. [More]
KAIST researchers develop bio-medical imaging tool to view, analyze live cells

KAIST researchers develop bio-medical imaging tool to view, analyze live cells

Professor YongKeun Park of the Physics Department at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and his research team have developed a powerful method for 3D imaging of live cells without staining. The researchers announced the launch of their new microscopic tool, the holotomography (HT)-1, to the global marketplace through a Korean start-up that Professor Park co-founded, TomoCube. [More]
Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Researchers at Orlando Health detected evidence of concussions in patients up to 7 days after their injury using a simple blood test, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology. The discovery could greatly expand the window for diagnosing concussions, especially in patients who experience a delayed onset of symptoms. [More]
Innovative scanning-led surveillance can help identify need for neck dissection

Innovative scanning-led surveillance can help identify need for neck dissection

Head and neck cancer patients may no longer have to undergo invasive post-treatment surgery to remove remaining cancer cells, as research shows that innovative scanning-led surveillance can help identify the need for, and guidance of, neck dissection. [More]
Guardian system can predict risk of dangerous diseases

Guardian system can predict risk of dangerous diseases

If an infectious disease outbreak or an attack using an agent such as anthrax were to occur in Chicago, it most likely first will be noticed in emergency rooms throughout the city. Swift identification of the cause of an incoming patients' illness could be crucial to public health and safety personnel being able to intervene in time to save lives. [More]
Global Health Frontiers' four-part newsmagazine series premieres on public television’s WORLD Channel

Global Health Frontiers' four-part newsmagazine series premieres on public television’s WORLD Channel

The acclaimed public television documentary series Global Health Frontiers expands to a weekly newsmagazine with four one-hour episodes combining compelling journalism from the leading edges of global health developments with a fast-paced and energetic style. [More]
Annual LDCT screenings not required for most high-risk lung cancer patients

Annual LDCT screenings not required for most high-risk lung cancer patients

Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. [More]
Antibiotic treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase risk for complications

Antibiotic treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase risk for complications

Using antibiotics as the primary treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase the risk for complications at least in the first year. But other considerations must also be taken into account, say researchers. [More]
Women succeed in jobs traditionally assigned to men at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica

Women succeed in jobs traditionally assigned to men at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica

When a bedridden patient needs to be lifted or turned or an unruly visitor needs to be escorted off the premises, the best man for the job at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica might actually be a woman [More]
High coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk for cancer, kidney disease and COPD

High coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk for cancer, kidney disease and COPD

A 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests that a high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Clinician communication increases patient knowledge, relieves distress related to incidental nodule detection

Clinician communication increases patient knowledge, relieves distress related to incidental nodule detection

A cross-sectional survey showed a quarter of patients with detected incidental pulmonary nodules experienced significant distress related to the nodule. Detailed clinician communication increased patient knowledge, relieved distress, and improved patient experience. [More]
New study finds dramatic increase in young athletes undergoing Tommy John surgery

New study finds dramatic increase in young athletes undergoing Tommy John surgery

A new study found a dramatic increase in the number of adolescents undergoing "Tommy John" surgery to repair a pitching-related elbow injury in recent years, outstripping growth among major league pitchers. [More]
Study shows link between obesity and treatment outcomes in breast cancer patients

Study shows link between obesity and treatment outcomes in breast cancer patients

A study published in the international journal, Cancer Biology and Therapy, describes research into the correlation between generalized obesity and treatment outcomes in breast cancer patients younger than 45 years old. [More]
Strange Glow: New book seeks to remove mystery that surrounds radiation

Strange Glow: New book seeks to remove mystery that surrounds radiation

Strange Glow tells the story of man's encounter with radiation, and how mankind has been transformed by the experience. The book focuses on a health-centric perspective "that seeks to remove some of the mystery and misunderstanding that surrounds radiation," says Jorgensen, director of the Health Physics and Radiation Protection Graduate Program, and chair of Georgetown's Radiation Safety Committee. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers successfully perform CT scans for joint fractures

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers successfully perform CT scans for joint fractures

Computed Tomography (CT) scans are one of the most frequently used imaging tools in medicine. In fact, more than 72 million scans are performed each year to diagnose various medical conditions. But public health concerns persist about radiation exposure from these tests—especially when given to children and young adults. [More]
Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

In around 2004, there was a Phillips paper that discussed a new imaging technique called MPI. At that time, I had an eager, promising graduate student named Matt Ferguson who wanted a project, so I asked him to take a look. [More]
3D planning and CAD/CAM techniques have potential for advances in plastic and reconstructive surgery

3D planning and CAD/CAM techniques have potential for advances in plastic and reconstructive surgery

While used mainly in craniofacial reconstruction so far, 3D planning and CAD/CAM techniques have the potential for advances in practically every area of plastic and reconstructive surgery, according to the review by Drs. Miles J. Pfaff and Derek Steinbacher of Yale University. [More]
Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be successfully treated with endovascular therapy such as balloon angioplasty, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. The study also found that AMI is a more common cause of abdominal pain among the elderly than generally thought; however, it is difficult to diagnose before bowel damage develops. [More]
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