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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages parents to stock up on healthy breakfasts for kids

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages parents to stock up on healthy breakfasts for kids

The back-to-school movement is in full swing. As parents scour stores for the year's school supplies, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages them to stock up on healthy breakfast foods, too. [More]
Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. [More]
New approach to predict myeloma patients using calcium isotope analysis

New approach to predict myeloma patients using calcium isotope analysis

A team of researchers from Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic is showing how a staple of Earth science research can be used in biomedical settings to predict the course of disease. [More]
New mechanism of joint destruction grinds away healthy cartilage, worsens osteoarthritis

New mechanism of joint destruction grinds away healthy cartilage, worsens osteoarthritis

A new mechanism of joint destruction caused by a natural material that grinds away healthy cartilage and worsens osteoarthritis has been identified in human hip joints for the first time by University of Liverpool scientists. [More]
Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

For the first time in the world, a patient with a mechanical heart pump has received a new gene therapy for heart failure at Harefield Hospital, London. [More]
UMass Amherst researcher receives grant to uncover molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle fatigue

UMass Amherst researcher receives grant to uncover molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle fatigue

Muscle physiologist Edward Debold at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's School of Public Health and Health Sciences recently received a three-year, $198,000 grant from the American Heart Association to support studies to uncover the molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle fatigue. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]
Researchers examine role of dairy products in preserving bone and skeletal muscle

Researchers examine role of dairy products in preserving bone and skeletal muscle

Understanding that diets are often built around food groups rather than specific nutrients, researchers from Switzerland, France, and North America decided to examine interactions between four nutrients found in dairy products and their role in preserving bone and skeletal muscle. [More]
Phase 3 trial: NEXAVAR tablets fail to meet primary endpoint in HER2-negative breast cancer patients

Phase 3 trial: NEXAVAR tablets fail to meet primary endpoint in HER2-negative breast cancer patients

Bayer HealthCare and Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc., an Amgen subsidiary, today announced that an investigational Phase 3 trial of NEXAVAR (sorafenib) tablets in patients with advanced breast cancer did not meet its primary endpoint of improving progression-free survival (PFS). [More]
Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Mouse models of human oral cancer treated with an agent called capsazepine showed dramatic tumor shrinkage without damage to surrounding tissues, researchers from the School of Dentistry and School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found. [More]
Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have low levels of vitamin D

People with schizophrenia more likely to have low levels of vitamin D

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Chemclin's Vitamin D assay helps in quantitative determination of 25-OH Vitamin D in human serum

Chemclin's Vitamin D assay helps in quantitative determination of 25-OH Vitamin D in human serum

Chemclin's new Vitamin D assay provides components for in-vitro quantitative determination of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D (25-OH Vitamin D) in human serum by a competitive chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. [More]
Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. [More]
13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. The fellowships aim to increase the number of scientists studying and treating psoriatic disease by encouraging promising doctors to dedicate their careers to the study of psoriasis as physician researchers. [More]
Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Fifty-seven million Americans suffer from low bone density or osteoporosis, a disease which causes bones to become so weak and brittle that even a minor fall or other stresses may cause fractures. [More]
Study attempts to link sun exposure and low vitamin D levels with increased death rate

Study attempts to link sun exposure and low vitamin D levels with increased death rate

Recently, a study in the Journal of Internal Medicine suggested that women who avoid sun exposure are twice as likely to die as compared to those who receive sun exposure. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Study of cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation

Study of cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation

A new study relevant for cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation. Scientists now have a better understanding of how short DNA strands decompose in microseconds [More]