Calcium News and Research RSS Feed - Calcium News and Research

Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older adults who suffer hip fractures aren't told they have the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis - despite the fact that hip fractures nearly always signify the presence of this potentially debilitating condition, according to revealing new research by Northwell Health physicians. [More]
New research defies earlier belief that calcium channels function independently

New research defies earlier belief that calcium channels function independently

Voltage-gated calcium channels open in unison, rather than independently, to allow calcium ions into and activate excitable cells such as neurons and muscle cells, researchers with UC Davis Health System and the University of Washington have found. [More]
Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King's College London. [More]
Take complementary medicines with care

Take complementary medicines with care

Following the broadcast of the ABC’s Four Corners episode last night on complementary medicines, NPS MedicineWise is reminding people to take these medicines with care. [More]
BetterYou Magnesium Oil spray relieves migraine pain in 43-year old mum

BetterYou Magnesium Oil spray relieves migraine pain in 43-year old mum

A 43-year old mum of one from Bristol, who suffered from frequent painful migraines for almost a decade has found relief thanks to BetterYou™ Magnesium Oil spray. [More]
General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

Anesthesia is used every day, but surprisingly little is known about one of its most dangerous side effects--depressed heart function. [More]
Benefits of calcium supplements in preventing broken bones may be cancelled out by increased stroke risk

Benefits of calcium supplements in preventing broken bones may be cancelled out by increased stroke risk

Taking calcium and vitamin D can help prevent broken bones in older women. However, this benefit may be cancelled out by an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Controlling heart cells using a laser: an interview with Prof. Konstantin Agladze

Controlling heart cells using a laser: an interview with Prof. Konstantin Agladze

We control their electrical activity. Cardiac cells are capable of producing and transmitting electric signals through changes in a cell membrane potential. [More]
T cell gives precise mechanical tugs to detect friends and foes

T cell gives precise mechanical tugs to detect friends and foes

T cells, the security guards of the immune system, use a kind of mechanical "handshake" to test whether a cell they encounter is a friend or foe, a new study finds. [More]
ITJ researchers develop new hydrating beverage for athletes

ITJ researchers develop new hydrating beverage for athletes

Jiquiquilpan's Institute of Technology in Mexico developed a hydrating beverage for athletes that is based on agave's fructans, that not only supplies the adequate water levels to the organisms, but also offers other benefits such as dietetic fiber. [More]
Blend of pulverized natural bone and man-made plastic can create 3D printed replacement bones

Blend of pulverized natural bone and man-made plastic can create 3D printed replacement bones

To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer. That's the recipe for success reported by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University in a paper published April 18 online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
Researchers discover critical new mechanism for genesis of heart failure

Researchers discover critical new mechanism for genesis of heart failure

A weak heart is unable to pump an adequate amount of blood around the body. In Germany, this condition is now the commonest reason for patients to be admitted to hospital. [More]
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
First generic version of Crestor gets FDA approval

First generic version of Crestor gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first generic version of Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium) tablets. [More]
Latest popular diets have nutrient gaps

Latest popular diets have nutrient gaps

Paleo, high-protein, low-carb, gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan eating lifestyles have all exploded in popularity in the last few years. Whether people adopt these diets in order to lose weight or maintain overall wellness, consumers that follow them may be missing out on some essential nutrients. In the April issue of Food Technology Magazine, Linda Mila Ohr writes about the nutrient gaps in these various diets and how consumers can make sure they get the nutrients they need. [More]
Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

Study reveals new function for CACNA1C gene in psychiatric diseases

A new study shows the death of newborn brain cells may be linked to a genetic risk factor for five major psychiatric diseases, and at the same time shows a compound currently being developed for use in humans may have therapeutic value for these diseases by preventing the cells from dying. [More]
Zinc sparks help doctors choose best eggs to transfer during IVF

Zinc sparks help doctors choose best eggs to transfer during IVF

A stunning explosion of zinc fireworks occurs when a human egg is activated by a sperm enzyme, and the size of these "sparks" is a direct measure of the quality of the egg and its ability to develop into an embryo, according to new research from Northwestern Medicine. [More]
Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Researchers at UMass Medical School have identified a new molecular pathway critical for maintaining the smooth muscle tone that allows the passage of materials through the digestive system. [More]
Testosterone may lead to greater heart attack risk in men than women

Testosterone may lead to greater heart attack risk in men than women

Testosterone might be involved in explaining why men have a greater risk of heart attacks than women of similar age, according to a study funded by the British Heart Foundation and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, could lead to new therapies to help reduce heart attack risk. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement