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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
New Tel Aviv University study finds link between Alzheimer's and brain hyperactivity

New Tel Aviv University study finds link between Alzheimer's and brain hyperactivity

Patients with Alzheimer's disease run a high risk of seizures. While the amyloid-beta protein involved in the development and progression of Alzheimer's seems the most likely cause for this neuronal hyperactivity, how and why this elevated activity takes place hasn't yet been explained - until now. [More]
Gene in brain promotes kidney cancer, report researchers

Gene in brain promotes kidney cancer, report researchers

A gene known to control brain growth and development is heavily involved in promoting clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida are reporting. [More]
Microparticles in crab, shrimp and lobster shells may help prevent inflammatory bowel disease

Microparticles in crab, shrimp and lobster shells may help prevent inflammatory bowel disease

Yoshimi Shibata, Ph.D., professor of biomedical science in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, has received a $380,552 grant from the National Institute of Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health to further investigate how microparticles called "chitin" found in crab, shrimp and lobster shells have anti-inflammatory mechanisms that could lead to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for individuals who suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and others diseases. [More]
Patients continue to lose bone at least 2 years after bariatric surgery, shows study

Patients continue to lose bone at least 2 years after bariatric surgery, shows study

A new study shows that for at least two years after bariatric surgery, patients continue to lose bone, even after their weight stabilizes. [More]
Cardiac Lead Extraction celebrates 25-Year anniversary at Cardiostim

Cardiac Lead Extraction celebrates 25-Year anniversary at Cardiostim

A quarter century ago, doctors treating patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers had a big problem. Their patients were outliving the complex electrical devices that gave them an acceptable quality of life. [More]
Calcium, vitamin D supplements may send blood levels too high for some women

Calcium, vitamin D supplements may send blood levels too high for some women

Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
FDA accepts Symplmed's Prestalia NDA for hypertension treatment

FDA accepts Symplmed's Prestalia NDA for hypertension treatment

Symplmed announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for review its New Drug Application (NDA) for investigational drug Prestalia, the first single-pill, fixed-dose combination (FDC) of perindopril arginine and amlodipine besylate for the treatment of hypertension in the U.S. Symplmed filed the application under section 505(b)(2) consistent with FDA's guidance. [More]
Innovative device boosts tooth's natural repair process

Innovative device boosts tooth's natural repair process

Dentists could soon be giving your teeth a mild 'time warp' to encourage them to self-repair, thanks to a new device being developed by dental researchers. [More]
Novel microscopy technology helps detect protein that plays key role in prostate cancer

Novel microscopy technology helps detect protein that plays key role in prostate cancer

Assemblies of proteins, known as protein complexes, have important functions in cells; protein complexes embedded in the cell membrane, for example, are responsible for the exchange with the extracellular environment. [More]
Tufts researchers gain new insight into protein associated with bipolar disorder

Tufts researchers gain new insight into protein associated with bipolar disorder

Researchers from Tufts have gained new insight into a protein associated with bipolar disorder. The study, published in the June 3 issue of Science Signaling, reveals that calcium channels in resting neurons activate the breakdown of Sp4, which belongs to a class of proteins called transcription factors that regulate gene expression. [More]
Janssen, Viiv Healthcare to develop single tablet regimen for maintenance treatment of HIV

Janssen, Viiv Healthcare to develop single tablet regimen for maintenance treatment of HIV

Janssen R&D Ireland Ltd announced today that they have entered into a collaboration with ViiV Healthcare to develop and commercialize a new single tablet regimen containing Janssen's Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor rilpivirine (marketed as EDURANT®) and ViiV's Integrase Inhibitor dolutegravir(marketed as TIVICAY®) as the sole active ingredients for the maintenance treatment of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). [More]
Novel bone implants can keep germs at bay

Novel bone implants can keep germs at bay

Hospital germs can be fatal, since they are resistant to antibiotics. As a result, alternative methods of defense against bacteria are in demand. Fortunately, a German-French research team has been able to develop bone implants that keep the germs at bay. [More]
Grain legume crops overlooked as potentially valuable sources of micronutrients

Grain legume crops overlooked as potentially valuable sources of micronutrients

Popular diets across the world typically focus on the right balance of essential components like protein, fat, and carbohydrates. These items are called macronutrients, and we consume them in relatively large quantities. [More]
Studies stress the importance of vitamin D intake during first year of life

Studies stress the importance of vitamin D intake during first year of life

Everyone seems to agree that vitamin D is important throughout life. This is certainly as true in the first year of life as it is later on. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal molecular secret behind short, intense exercise

TSRI scientists reveal molecular secret behind short, intense exercise

In the last few years, the benefits of short, intense workouts have been extolled by both researchers and exercise fans as something of a metabolic panacea capable of providing greater overall fitness, better blood sugar control and weight reduction-all of it in periods as short as seven minutes a few times a week. [More]
Geoff Keller Group of MHAUS hosts fundraising event to promote MH awareness

Geoff Keller Group of MHAUS hosts fundraising event to promote MH awareness

The Geoffrey Keller Memorial Open Water Swim held in honor of the late son of Curt and Kathy Keller to raise funds to research better ways of managing Malignant Hyperthermia during surgery, to improve methods of detecting MH, and for MH awareness. [More]
Storing dantrolene can save 33 lives per year, say MH experts

Storing dantrolene can save 33 lives per year, say MH experts

MH experts say Storing dantrolene would save 33 lives per year at an incremental cost effectiveness ratio of nearly $200,000 (in 2010 dollars) per life saved, indicating that storing dantrolene at ambulatory surgical centers is very cost effective say, Malignant Hyperthermia Experts: Taiwo Aderibigbe, BS; Barbara H. Lang, BS; Henry Rosenberg, MD; Guohua Li, MD, PhD, Columbia University, New York who authored the article "Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stocking Dantrolene in Ambulatory Surgery Centers" that was recently published in the latest official journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Anesthesiology. [More]

New edible films contain oils from clove and oregano that preserve bread longer

Essential oils have boomed in popularity as more people seek out alternatives to replace their synthetic cleaning products, anti-mosquito sprays and medicines. Now scientists are tapping them as candidates to preserve food in a more consumer-friendly way. [More]
Painless wearable microneedle device can analyze electrolyte levels on the spot

Painless wearable microneedle device can analyze electrolyte levels on the spot

Patients trying to navigate today's complex medical system with its costly laboratory analyses might prefer a pain-free home diagnostic device, worn on the wrist, that can analyze, continuously record and immediately remedy low electrolyte levels. [More]
Parents should take initiative to make sure their hungry teens have healthy fare to eat

Parents should take initiative to make sure their hungry teens have healthy fare to eat

Refrigerators and pantries across the country are bracing for the seasonal assault from teenagers who are now done with school and will eat most of their meals at home for the summer months. [More]