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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Ardelyx announces positive results from RDX022 clinical study for treatment of hyperkalemia

Ardelyx announces positive results from RDX022 clinical study for treatment of hyperkalemia

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on gastrointestinal and cardio-renal diseases, today announced positive results of an open label clinical study evaluating the pharmacodynamic (PD) activity of RDX022 in healthy adult volunteers. [More]
Study lays foundation for better therapeutic strategies to halt progression of tissue degeneration

Study lays foundation for better therapeutic strategies to halt progression of tissue degeneration

Injury and degeneration of fibro-cartilaginous tissues, such as the knee meniscus and the intervertebral disc, have significant socioeconomic and quality-of-life costs. But the development of effective treatment strategies to address pathologies in these load-bearing tissues has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the relationships between their structure and their function. [More]
Bayer to present new research findings on Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) injection at ASCO GU 2016

Bayer to present new research findings on Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) injection at ASCO GU 2016

Bayer announced today that new research findings on Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) injection will be presented at the 2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO GU) taking place January 7 – 9 in San Francisco. [More]
3-D recordings of nematode brains may help understand how neurons coordinate action and perception

3-D recordings of nematode brains may help understand how neurons coordinate action and perception

Princeton University researchers have captured among the first recordings of neural activity in nearly the entire brain of a free-moving animal. The three-dimensional recordings could provide scientists with a better understanding of how neurons coordinate action and perception in animals. [More]
Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Johns Hopkins has demonstrated in animals that applying a pacemaker's mild electrical shocks to push the heart in and out of normal synchronized contraction for part of each day may be an effective way to slow down the progression of heart failure, a disorder that afflicts millions of Americans. [More]
Bioactive glass may help prolong life of composite tooth fillings

Bioactive glass may help prolong life of composite tooth fillings

A few years from now millions of people around the world might be walking around with an unusual kind of glass in their mouth, and using it every time they eat. [More]
Scientists uncover novel strategy to block cancer's spread, restore tumor vulnerability to chemotherapy

Scientists uncover novel strategy to block cancer's spread, restore tumor vulnerability to chemotherapy

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered how an aggressive tumor of the muscle and soft tissue hijacks an export pathway in cells to lay the groundwork for cancer progression and resistance to chemotherapy. [More]

QMUL-led scientists develop new type of synthetic bone graft

Scientists led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have developed a new type of synthetic bone graft that boosts the body's own ability to regenerate bone tissue and could produce better outcomes for patients. [More]
Kitov announces more data from Phase III trial on the favorable blood pressure effects of KIT-302

Kitov announces more data from Phase III trial on the favorable blood pressure effects of KIT-302

Kitov Pharmaceuticals, an innovative biopharmaceutical company focused on late-stage drug development, today announced more data from its successfully concluded Phase III trial for its lead drug candidate, KIT-302. Data showed the favorable blood pressure effects of KIT-302 were present in all blood pressure variables measured in the study. [More]
Anemia associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment

Anemia associated with increased risk of mild cognitive impairment

In a large population-based study of randomly selected participants in Germany, researchers found that participants with anemia, defined as haemoglobin <13 g/dl in men and <12 g/dl in women, showed lower performances in verbal memory and executive functions. [More]
Surgery more effective than drug therapy in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism

Surgery more effective than drug therapy in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism

A study led by researchers from the Nephrology group at Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University Hospital of Bellvitge (HUB), compared the results of surgery with drug therapy in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism, ie after a kidney transplant. [More]
REGENSCIENTIFIC obtains CE-mark for Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant

REGENSCIENTIFIC obtains CE-mark for Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant

REGENSCIENTIFIC announced today that it has received the CE-mark (CE 630688) for the Renú Soft Tissue (Volumizing) Implant for Lipoatrophy, Vocal Fold Insufficiency and Soft Tissue Augmentation. [More]
Study provides insight into design, production of today's functional beverages

Study provides insight into design, production of today's functional beverages

Adding calcium, Vitamin D and prebiotic dietary fibre to a beverage made of whey can have huge health benefits for those who drink it, team of Lithuanian scientists has discovered. [More]
Combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone may speed healing process for bone fractures

Combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone may speed healing process for bone fractures

A combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone significantly increased new bone formation in laboratory animals and may speed the healing process for human bone fractures caused by osteoporosis, a new study shows. [More]
Biotypes can identify distinct subgroups of psychosis

Biotypes can identify distinct subgroups of psychosis

Three biomarker-based categories, called biotypes, outperformed traditional diagnoses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis, in sorting psychosis cases into distinct subgroups on the basis of brain biology, report researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Cadmium exposure increases risk of osteoporosis and fractures

Cadmium exposure increases risk of osteoporosis and fractures

People who are exposed to higher levels of cadmium have an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. Cadmium also affects the kidneys. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy explored this issue in a study of over 900 older men. [More]
Reduced bone mass puts critically ill patients at greater risk for fractures

Reduced bone mass puts critically ill patients at greater risk for fractures

One year after being hospitalized in intensive care, patients have reduced bone mass that puts them at greater risk for fractures, according to a new study published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
New model of arterial thrombus formation is similar to popular video game

New model of arterial thrombus formation is similar to popular video game

A group of biophysicists, including representatives from MIPT, has developed a mathematical model of arterial thrombus formation, which is the main cause of heart attacks and strokes. [More]
Philips launches IntelliSpace Portal 8.0 platform for diagnosis and treatment of cancer

Philips launches IntelliSpace Portal 8.0 platform for diagnosis and treatment of cancer

Strengthening its leadership in connected healthcare informatics, Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) today announced IntelliSpace Portal 8.0 , the latest edition of its advanced data sharing, analytics and visualization platform that helps radiologists detect, diagnose and follow-up on treatment of diseases. [More]
Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

In addition to their well established cholesterol lowering benefits, statins also have potent anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and antioxidant effects, which continue to be identified in a wide range of diseases. [More]
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