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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles. [More]
Overuse injuries more common in girls participating in high school sports

Overuse injuries more common in girls participating in high school sports

A new study performed by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that when it comes to overuse injuries in high school sports, girls are at a much higher risk than boys. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

Johns Hopkins scientists use experimental therapy to reverse progression of atherosclerosis in rodents

In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals’ ability to properly handle cholesterol. [More]
FASEB honors Max Planck Florida scientist with Glaxo Smith Kline Neuroscience Discovery Award

FASEB honors Max Planck Florida scientist with Glaxo Smith Kline Neuroscience Discovery Award

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology has honored Samuel M. Young, Jr. Ph.D., a Max Planck Research Group Leader at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, with the Glaxo Smith Kline Neuroscience Discovery Award. [More]
Purdue University researchers pinpoint gene that controls permeability, calcium content of soybean seed

Purdue University researchers pinpoint gene that controls permeability, calcium content of soybean seed

Purdue University researchers have pinpointed the gene that controls whether soybean seed coats are hard or permeable, a finding that could be used to develop better varieties for southern and tropical regions, enrich the crop's genetic diversity and boost the nutritional value of soybeans. [More]
Scientific CMOS advantages over CCD: an interview with Robert LaBelle

Scientific CMOS advantages over CCD: an interview with Robert LaBelle

The optiMOS sCMOS camera from QImaging is a new alternative to CCD based cameras for fluorescence microscopy, particularly when capturing fast cellular events. This frame-rate improvement was achieved while substantially increasing the camera’s field-of-view and the ability to measure low light signals. [More]
Discovery provides clue to long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses function

Discovery provides clue to long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses function

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has identified the first sensor of the Earth's magnetic field in an animal, finding in the brain of a tiny worm a big clue to a long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses work. [More]
Ruhr-Universität Bochum scientists develop mouse model to investigate SCA6

Ruhr-Universität Bochum scientists develop mouse model to investigate SCA6

Scientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum established a mouse model for the human disease SCA6. SCA6 is characterised by movement deficits and caused by similar genetic alterations as Chorea Huntington. The mouse model will be used to investigate the disease mechanisms. [More]
Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

One mouse with weak bones appears to have a strong metabolism, even on a high-fat diet, scientists report. While weaker bones are clearly not a good thing, scientists suspect that, somewhere in the conversation between the genetically engineered mouse's skeleton and the rest of its body, there may be an answer that helps obese individuals avoid some of the worst ravages of this health epidemic. [More]
Experimental drug improves failing heart's function

Experimental drug improves failing heart's function

An experimental drug improves the ability of heart muscle cells damaged by heart failure to pump blood, according to the results of a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers and published online today in Nature Communications. [More]
Recurrent major depression may increase osteoporosis risk in men

Recurrent major depression may increase osteoporosis risk in men

A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland in collaboration with Deakin University, Australia, shows that recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) in men is associated with lower bone density. The use of antidepressants was also associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this association was dependent on the person's weight and site of bone measurement. [More]
LEO Pharma reports encouraging data from PSO-FAST clinical trial of Enstilar for psoriasis treatment

LEO Pharma reports encouraging data from PSO-FAST clinical trial of Enstilar for psoriasis treatment

LEO Pharma A/S today announced that new data being presented at the 23rd World Congress of Dermatology shows aerosol foam Enstilar® (calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate 50 micrograms/g / 0,5 mg/g), the Company's dual-action investigational aerosol foam for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris, provided rapid itch relief and improvements in itch-related sleep loss for patients suffering from psoriasis. [More]
Research reveals how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms during exercise

Research reveals how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms during exercise

University of Manchester research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference has revealed how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms that are brought on by exercise. [More]
Star-shaped brain cells control cerebral blood flow and blood pressure

Star-shaped brain cells control cerebral blood flow and blood pressure

A star-shaped brain cell called an astrocyte appears to help keep blood pressure and blood flow inside the brain on a healthy, even keel, scientists report. [More]
GSU scientists design new MRI technique for early detection of liver tumors

GSU scientists design new MRI technique for early detection of liver tumors

Scientists at Georgia State University with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering have designed an imaging technique to detect early-stage liver tumors, and have proven it successful in mice. [More]
Nature's Bounty introduces Women's Multivitamin Gummies

Nature's Bounty introduces Women's Multivitamin Gummies

Nature's Bounty, one of the most trusted names in vitamins, supplements and nutrition, is excited to introduce its Women's Multivitamin Gummies, the newest addition to the Optimal Solutions health, beauty and wellness line. This supplement helps provide women with the nutrients needed to support a healthy, strong and beautiful body. [More]
Janssen begins rolling submission of daratumumab BLA to FDA for treatment of patients with multiple myeloma

Janssen begins rolling submission of daratumumab BLA to FDA for treatment of patients with multiple myeloma

Janssen Research & Development, LLC has initiated the rolling submission of its Biologic License Application (BLA) for daratumumab to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least three prior lines of therapy, including a proteasome inhibitor (PI) and an immunomodulatory agent (IMiD), or who are double refractory to a PI and an IMiD. [More]
Cytokinetics, The ALS Association expand partnership to fight against ALS

Cytokinetics, The ALS Association expand partnership to fight against ALS

Cytokinetics, Incorporated and The ALS Association announced an expanded partnership in which the company will provide Gold Level Sponsorship of the National Walks to Defeat ALS as well as Platinum Level Sponsorship for ALS Association Golden West Chapter initiatives. [More]
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