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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
People with schizophrenia more likely to have low levels of vitamin D

People with schizophrenia more likely to have low levels of vitamin D

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Chemclin's Vitamin D assay helps in quantitative determination of 25-OH Vitamin D in human serum

Chemclin's Vitamin D assay helps in quantitative determination of 25-OH Vitamin D in human serum

Chemclin's new Vitamin D assay provides components for in-vitro quantitative determination of 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D (25-OH Vitamin D) in human serum by a competitive chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. [More]
Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. [More]
13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. The fellowships aim to increase the number of scientists studying and treating psoriatic disease by encouraging promising doctors to dedicate their careers to the study of psoriasis as physician researchers. [More]
Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Study examines mechanism of bone-protective properties of California dried plums

Fifty-seven million Americans suffer from low bone density or osteoporosis, a disease which causes bones to become so weak and brittle that even a minor fall or other stresses may cause fractures. [More]
Study attempts to link sun exposure and low vitamin D levels with increased death rate

Study attempts to link sun exposure and low vitamin D levels with increased death rate

Recently, a study in the Journal of Internal Medicine suggested that women who avoid sun exposure are twice as likely to die as compared to those who receive sun exposure. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Study of cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation

Study of cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation

A new study relevant for cancer radiation therapy shows that DNA building blocks are susceptible to fragmentation. Scientists now have a better understanding of how short DNA strands decompose in microseconds [More]
Research: Soluble corn fibre may enhance calcium absorption

Research: Soluble corn fibre may enhance calcium absorption

Around the globe, fibre and calcium intakes are below the levels recommended by experts contributing to potential long-term public health implications. New research, published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition, shows soluble corn fibre (SCF) may not simply boost fibre intake when added to foods, but can also increase the amount of beneficial bacteria present in the gut, while enhancing calcium absorption in adolescents. [More]
Daily temperatures increase number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones

Daily temperatures increase number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet's impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates. [More]
Skin cells possess olfactory receptor for sandalwood scent

Skin cells possess olfactory receptor for sandalwood scent

Skin cells possess an olfactory receptor for sandalwood scent, as researchers at the Ruhr-Universit-t Bochum have discovered. [More]
Doctors offer new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart

Doctors offer new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart

Doctors at the Orlando Health Heart Institute are offering a new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart valves who are considered to be at high risk to undergo surgery. Orlando Health is the only hospital in Orlando currently offering the Medtronic CoreValveĀ® System. [More]
KoACT supplement optimal for bone strength, flexibility in post-menopausal women

KoACT supplement optimal for bone strength, flexibility in post-menopausal women

Data presented at April's Experimental Biology 2014 Annual Scientific Meeting shows that KoACT, a dietary supplement that combines a proprietary formulation of calcium and collagen is optimal for bone strength and flexibility in post-menopausal women. [More]
New evidence for painless AF treatment to be presented at FCVB 2014

New evidence for painless AF treatment to be presented at FCVB 2014

The first evidence for a shockless treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) will be presented today at Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. T [More]
Scientists discover 23 new genes linked to heart rhythm

Scientists discover 23 new genes linked to heart rhythm

The QT interval is part of the heart's electrical cycle as measured by ECG, and represents the electrical depolarization and repolarization of the ventricles. Lengthened intervals indicate dysfunction in the heart beat and are liable to lead to a five-fold increase in the risk of sudden death from heart failure. [More]
Elderly mRCC patients should not be excluded from targeted therapy option

Elderly mRCC patients should not be excluded from targeted therapy option

Advanced age is not a reason to preclude patients from receiving vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, show study findings from a mixed-age patient population. [More]
Study uncovers new information on genes that may increase risk of cardiac arrhythmias

Study uncovers new information on genes that may increase risk of cardiac arrhythmias

Two international research studies, both led by investigators affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, have uncovered new information about genes that may increase the risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias. [More]
New Tel Aviv University study finds link between Alzheimer's and brain hyperactivity

New Tel Aviv University study finds link between Alzheimer's and brain hyperactivity

Patients with Alzheimer's disease run a high risk of seizures. While the amyloid-beta protein involved in the development and progression of Alzheimer's seems the most likely cause for this neuronal hyperactivity, how and why this elevated activity takes place hasn't yet been explained - until now. [More]
Gene in brain promotes kidney cancer, report researchers

Gene in brain promotes kidney cancer, report researchers

A gene known to control brain growth and development is heavily involved in promoting clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida are reporting. [More]