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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
Endocrine Society issues guideline on prescribing drugs to manage obesity, promote weight loss

Endocrine Society issues guideline on prescribing drugs to manage obesity, promote weight loss

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on strategies for prescribing drugs to manage obesity and promote weight loss. [More]
Endocrinology Network offers up-to-date coverage of SGLT2 inhibitors

Endocrinology Network offers up-to-date coverage of SGLT2 inhibitors

UBM Medica US announces that Endocrinology Network, a leading online community for endocrinologists and other clinicians who treat patients with T2DM offers comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. [More]
Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Latest research from the University of Surrey has found that the potassium salts (bicarbonate and citrate) plentiful in fruit and vegetables, play an important part in improving bone health. For the first time, the results also showed that these potassium salts reduce bone resorption, the process by which bone is broken down, therefore increasing their strength. [More]
Study examines impact of removing chocolate milk from Saskatoon elementary schools

Study examines impact of removing chocolate milk from Saskatoon elementary schools

Researchers from the College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan measured milk consumption (plain milk and flavoured milk) by children in a sample of Saskatoon elementary schools. This is the first study in a Canadian elementary school population to investigate the impact of removing chocolate milk from schools. [More]
Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Women aged 60-70 who are satisfied with their lives have a higher bone density and they suffer from osteoporosis less frequently than their unsatisfied peers, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Review shows that fish compound can help combat cardiovascular disease

Review shows that fish compound can help combat cardiovascular disease

A major international review of a peptide originally found in fish that could be used in the battle against cardiovascular disease has been published. [More]
Neuroscientists move one step closer to solving how learning and memory work

Neuroscientists move one step closer to solving how learning and memory work

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical "clamp" that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger. [More]
Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Each year more than 12 million Americans visit their doctors complaining of headaches, which result in lost productivity and costs of upward of $31 billion annually. A new study by researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests some of that cost could be offset by physicians ordering fewer tests and an increased focus on counseling about lifestyle changes. [More]
Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

NRTIs are compounds which were originally developed in the 1960s as anti-cancer agents. They are similar in structure to the bases which make up DNA, and it was hoped that they would interfere with DNA replication in fast-growing cancer cells, slowing down or stopping tumour growth. [More]
Very small changes in blood acidity level may have detrimental impact on patients with CKD

Very small changes in blood acidity level may have detrimental impact on patients with CKD

A University of Manchester scientist has discovered that very small changes in the level of acidity in blood may have a detrimental impact on the health of patients with kidney disease. [More]
LEO Pharma submits NDA for aerosol foam formulation to treat patients with plaque psoriasis

LEO Pharma submits NDA for aerosol foam formulation to treat patients with plaque psoriasis

LEO Pharma announces it has submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) for calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam, 0.005%/0.064%, to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. [More]
Certain complementary medicines may cause side effects, warns NPS MedicineWise

Certain complementary medicines may cause side effects, warns NPS MedicineWise

With new information from Melbourne’s Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre revealing that some complementary medicines can interact with cancer treatment, NPS MedicineWise reminds all Australians that complementary medicines can cause side effects, and interact with other over-the-counter and prescription medicines. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Signifor long-acting release (LAR) (pasireotide) for injectable suspension, for intramuscular use, for the treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to surgery and/or for whom surgery is not an option. [More]
WSU researchers working on better bone-like materials used in hip and knee replacements

WSU researchers working on better bone-like materials used in hip and knee replacements

Washington State University researchers are working to improve materials used in hip and knee replacements so that they last longer and allow patients to quickly get back on their feet after surgery. [More]
Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

Study calls for new protocols to treat women with high blood pressure

That blood pressure plays a role in human health has been known for quite a while. Hypertension - the medical term for high blood pressure - was first described as a disease in the early 1800s, and the inflatable cuff that's used in measuring blood pressure was invented in 1896. [More]
Amgen's XGEVA (denosumab) receives FDA approval for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy

Amgen's XGEVA (denosumab) receives FDA approval for treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new indication for XGEVA (denosumab) for the treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy (HCM) refractory to bisphosphonate therapy. [More]
New study reveals how soil helps control air pollution

New study reveals how soil helps control air pollution

Scientists have long known that air pollution caused by cars and trucks, solvent use and even plants, is reduced when broken down by naturally occurring compounds that act like detergents of the atmosphere. What has not been well understood until now are the relative contributions of all the processes producing such compounds. [More]
Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

At the Center for Brain Research at the MedUni Vienna an important factor for stress has been identified in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm (Sweden). This is the protein secretagogin that plays an important role in the release of the stress hormone CRH and which only then enables stress processes in the brain to be transmitted to the pituitary gland and then onwards to the organs. [More]
Calcivis announces completion of first clinical study of Caries Activity Imaging System

Calcivis announces completion of first clinical study of Caries Activity Imaging System

Calcivis, a medical devices company focused on revolutionising the management of tooth decay, today announces that it has completed a first clinical study of its Calcivis® Caries Activity Imaging System. [More]