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Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the body, is found in some foods, added to others, available as a dietary supplement, and present in some medicines (such as antacids). Calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel expansion and contraction, secretion of hormones and enzymes, and transmitting impulses throughout the nervous system. The body strives to maintain constant concentrations of calcium in blood, muscle, and intercellular fluids, though less than <1% of total body calcium is needed to support these functions.

The remaining 99% of the body's calcium supply is stored in the bones and teeth where it supports their structure. Bone itself undergoes continuous remodeling, with constant resorption and deposition of calcium into new bone. The balance between bone resorption and deposition changes with age. Bone formation exceeds resorption in growing children, whereas in early and middle adulthood both processes are relatively equal. In aging adults, particularly among postmenopausal women, bone breakdown exceeds formation, resulting in bone loss that increases the risk of osteoporosis over time.
Researchers develop new responsive coating for implants used in surgery

Researchers develop new responsive coating for implants used in surgery

A research group at Uppsala University, Sweden has developed a new responsive coating for implants used in surgery to improve their integration into bone and to prevent rejection. Neutron scattering experiments at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France have shown how a protein that promotes bone growth binds to this surface and can be released in a controlled way. [More]
Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

Mechanical circulatory assist device may have untapped potential in heart surgery patients, say physicians

The most frequently used mechanical circulatory assist device in the world may have untapped potential, physicians say. [More]
Women who have 4 or more live births more likely to show early signs of heart disease

Women who have 4 or more live births more likely to show early signs of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are much more likely to have evidence of plaque in their heart or thickening of their arteries - early signs of cardiovascular disease - compared with those having fewer pregnancies, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New finding reinforces importance of developing healthy eating habits early in life

New finding reinforces importance of developing healthy eating habits early in life

Women who ate a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables as young adults were much less likely to have plaque build-up in their arteries 20 years later compared with those who consumed lower amounts of these foods, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Dr. Reddy's Laboratories launches Amlodipine Besylate and Atorvastatin Calcium Tablets

Dr. Reddy's Laboratories announced today that it has launched Amlodipine Besylate and Atorvastatin Calcium Tablets 2.5/10mg, 2.5/20mg, 2.5/40mg, 5/10mg, 5/20mg, 5/40mg, 5/80mg, 10/10mg, 10/20mg, 10/40mg and 10/80 mg a therapeutic equivalent generic version of CADUET (amlodipine Besylate and atorvastatin calcium) tablets, in the US market on March 26, 2014, following the approval by the United States Food & Drug Administration. [More]
Stem cell research opens doors to potential new treatments for bipolar disorder

Stem cell research opens doors to potential new treatments for bipolar disorder

What makes a person bipolar, prone to manic highs and deep, depressed lows? Why does bipolar disorder run so strongly in families, even though no single gene is to blame? And why is it so hard to find new treatments for a condition that affects 200 million people worldwide? [More]
Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered an important mechanism underlying sensory feedback that guides balance and limb movements. [More]
Researchers create statistical model to predict whether heart scans are useful in prescribing statins

Researchers create statistical model to predict whether heart scans are useful in prescribing statins

As long as inexpensive statins, which lower cholesterol, are readily available and patients don't mind taking them, it doesn't make sense to do a heart scan to measure how much plaque has built up in a patient's coronary arteries before prescribing the pills, according to a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Merck's NOXAFIL injection gets FDA approval for intravenous use

Merck's NOXAFIL injection gets FDA approval for intravenous use

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved NOXAFIL (posaconazole) injection (18 mg/ mL), a new formulation of NOXAFIL for intravenous (IV) use. [More]
Japanese PAH patient prognosis ‘good’

Japanese PAH patient prognosis ‘good’

Japanese patients respond well to pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted drugs and may have a good prognosis with long-term survival, study findings suggest. [More]

Patients with congenital disorders are urged to register with CMDIR to advance clinical trials

If you are affected by Malignant Hyperthermia, Congenital Muscular Dystrophies or Congenital Myopathy Subtypes, the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States and the Cure Congenital Muscle Disease organization are asking for your help to enable research and clinical trials by registering with the Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry (CMDIR). [More]
Researchers identify new player in onset and progression of heart failure

Researchers identify new player in onset and progression of heart failure

A team of cardiovascular researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, and University of California, San Diego have identified a small, but powerful, new player in the onset and progression of heart failure. [More]

Some "junk foods" can help child's oral health

If there's one thing that all dentists have in common, it's that they regularly see young patients with tooth decay. Roughly 41 percent of children age 2-11 have had decay in their primary teeth, while approximately 32 percent of children ages 9-11 have decay in their permanent teeth. [More]

Study links association between eating red, processed meat and risk of developing cancer in gut

​Recent reports warn about a link between eating red and processed meat and the risk of developing cancer in the gut. These reports have resulted in new nutritional recommendations that advise people to limit their intake of red and processed meats. [More]

Reports warn about link between eating red and processed meat

Recent reports warn about a link between eating red and processed meat and the risk of developing cancer in the gut. These reports have resulted in new nutritional recommendations that advise people to limit their intake of red and processed meats. [More]

New bioinspired gel material could help repair damaged teeth and bone

A bit of pressure from a new shrinking, sponge-like gel is all it takes to turn transplanted unspecialized cells into cells that lay down minerals and begin to form teeth. [More]
Calcium and vitamin D supplements can improve cholesterol profiles in postmenopausal women

Calcium and vitamin D supplements can improve cholesterol profiles in postmenopausal women

Calcium and vitamin D supplements after menopause can improve women's cholesterol profiles. And much of that effect is tied to raising vitamin D levels, finds a new study from the Women's Health Initiative just published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]

Noninvasive imaging with MRI of carotid artery plaque accurately predicts future cardiovascular events

Noninvasive imaging of carotid artery plaque with MRI can accurately predict future cardiovascular events like strokes and heart attacks in people without a history of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Biostatistics provides clues to understanding autism: an interview with Dr Knut M. Wittkowski, The Rockefeller University

Biostatistics provides clues to understanding autism: an interview with Dr Knut M. Wittkowski, The Rockefeller University

The incidence of autism spectrum disorders has increased sharply since it was first described 60 years ago. Today, ASD affects more than 1% of all children in the U.S. and about half of them develop a life-long disability. [More]
Cedars-Sinai neurosurgeon successfully performs CSF repair surgery on patient

Cedars-Sinai neurosurgeon successfully performs CSF repair surgery on patient

When Elizabeth "Beth" Johnson stood up from working at her computer Oct. 28, she noticed "a kind of funny feeling" in the back of her neck. By Nov. 2, the sensation had become an excruciating headache that came on whenever she tried to stand or sit upright. [More]