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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes

Millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes

The steep decline in the use of hormone therapy has spawned a prevalent but preventable side effect: millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes, according to a study by a Yale School of Medicine researcher and colleagues. [More]
HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

HICCC receives $18 million grant from the National Cancer Institute

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]
Widespread awareness, better treatment lower prostate cancer death rates

Widespread awareness, better treatment lower prostate cancer death rates

Fewer men are being diagnosed with and dying from prostate cancer these days. While that is due in part to widespread awareness and better treatment, it is also the result of more judicious screening. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-APOCIIIRx Phase 3 study in FCS patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced the initiation of a Phase 3 study evaluating ISIS-APOCIIIRx in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS). FCS is a rare orphan disease, characterized by extremely high triglyceride levels, that affects an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 patients worldwide. [More]
First Edition: August 28, 2014

First Edition: August 28, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about the Congressional Budget Office's latest projections regarding Medicare and Medicaid spending. [More]
Scientists explore ways to personalise radiotherapy dose given to lung cancer patients

Scientists explore ways to personalise radiotherapy dose given to lung cancer patients

Manchester scientists are working out how to safely increase the radiotherapy dose given to lung cancer patients - potentially offering improved local control and survival. [More]
Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Most new moms know the benefits of breast feeding. For babies, it can lower the risk of developing asthma, diabetes, and leukemia. For moms, it reduces the risk of breast cancer. But many women still don't know where to turn for help when breast feeding doesn't go as smoothly as they imagined it would. [More]
Patients with intestinal polyps have lower risk of dying from cancer

Patients with intestinal polyps have lower risk of dying from cancer

Patients with intestinal polyps have a lower risk of dying from cancer than previously thought, according to Norwegian researchers. [More]
Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. [More]
Advanced statistical approach evaluates gene-environmental interactions that contribute to disease

Advanced statistical approach evaluates gene-environmental interactions that contribute to disease

Dartmouth cancer researchers developed and tested an advanced statistical model to evaluate the genetic and environmental interactions that contribute to disease as published yesterday in Human Genetics. [More]
Men who are not well educated about prostate cancer face decisional conflict, finds UCLA study

Men who are not well educated about prostate cancer face decisional conflict, finds UCLA study

They say knowledge is power, and a new UCLA study has shown this is definitely the case when it comes to men making the best decisions about how to treat their prostate cancer. [More]
New research suggests that tomato-rich diet can lower prostate cancer risk

New research suggests that tomato-rich diet can lower prostate cancer risk

Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 per cent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests. [More]
Futile medical care crowds out other patients

Futile medical care crowds out other patients

Every day in intensive care units across the country, patients get aggressive, expensive treatment their caregivers know is not going to save their lives or make them better. California researchers now report this so-called "futile" care has a hidden price: It's crowding out other patients who could otherwise survive, recover and get back to living their lives. [More]
Receiving prescription at discharge improves outcomes in stroke patients

Receiving prescription at discharge improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke patients are 70 per cent more likely to continue taking their stroke prevention medications one year later if they have a prescription in hand when discharged - according to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. [More]

Three pilot programs aim to improve colorectal cancer screening, follow-up care in community setting

Three locations will each receive $100,000 in funding to launch pilot programs to improve colorectal cancer screening rates and follow-up care for patients served by community health centers. The program is the work of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable and is part of the group's effort to reach the goal of 80 percent of adults 50 and over receiving regular screening for colorectal cancer by 2018. [More]
First Edition: August 27, 2014

First Edition: August 27, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about Kevin Counihan, the person who take on the challenge of running healthcare.gov. [More]
Asterias receives clearance from FDA to initiate Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1

Asterias receives clearance from FDA to initiate Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1

Asterias Biotherapeutics Inc. has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to initiate a Phase 1/2a clinical trial of its product, AST-OPC1, in patients with complete cervical spinal cord injury. [More]
Unregulated trash burning around the globe pumps more air pollution

Unregulated trash burning around the globe pumps more air pollution

Unregulated trash burning around the globe is pumping far more pollution into the atmosphere than shown by official records. [More]
Meridian Health joins "The Baton Pass" to spread message of hope

Meridian Health joins "The Baton Pass" to spread message of hope

Meridian Health, a leading health care system in New Jersey, joined a national movement called "The Baton Pass™" to help raise funds for innovative cancer research and spread a message of hope. [More]
Ames test successfully adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols

Ames test successfully adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols

The Ames test, a widely used method to determine whether a chemical has the potential to cause cancer, has been successfully adapted for use with cigarette smoke and other complex aerosols. [More]