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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.

Neoadjuvant targeted treatment shows feasibility for limited clear-cell RCC

Treating patients with nonmetastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib could not only prevent disease progression, but also shrink tumours before surgery, show the results of a phase II trial. [More]
Surgery promising for non-metastatic RCC with thrombus

Surgery promising for non-metastatic RCC with thrombus

Almost half of patients with non-metastatic renal cell carcinoma who have tumour thrombus above the hepatic veins will survive for 5 years after surgery, indicate study results published in The Journal of Urology. [More]

Sunitinib-related fatigue occurs early then tails off during RCC treatment

Patients beginning sunitinib treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma should be warned that fatigue is likely to occur early, but that it is unlikely to worsen over the course of treatment, suggest US researchers in Cancer. [More]

Multiple lines of targeted therapy extend life for mRCC patients

Overall survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma is extended the more lines of targeted therapy they receive, shows an evaluation of a large retrospective multicentre database. [More]

Intravesical prostatic protrusion predicts post-surgery incontinence

The length of intravesical prostatic protrusion in men undergoing radical prostatectomy predicts the likelihood that they will develop incontinence following surgery, Korean researchers have shown. [More]

Nocturnal incontinence poses major burden after female bladder reconstruction

Health-related quality of life is lower in women who have undergone radical cystectomy and neobladder reconstruction for bladder cancer than in the general female population, shows research. [More]
OncoSec to present update of data from Phase 2 melanoma study at ASCO Annual Meeting

OncoSec to present update of data from Phase 2 melanoma study at ASCO Annual Meeting

OncoSec Medical Inc., a company developing its ImmunoPulse DNA-based immunotherapy to treat solid tumors, will present an update of data from their Phase 2 melanoma study at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 50th Annual Meeting, taking place May 30-June 3, 2014, at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. [More]
FDA announces expanded approval of Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for CLL treatment

FDA announces expanded approval of Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for CLL treatment

The US Food and Drug Administration has announced the expanded approval of Arzerra (ofatumumab) in combination with chlorambucil for the first-line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Arzerra was previously approved by the FDA in October 2009 for the treatment of CLL resistant to other forms of chemotherapy. Diplomat has access to dispense Arzerra. [More]
First Edition: April 22, 2014

First Edition: April 22, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including marketplace news about the Novartis purchase of GlaxoSmithKline's oncology unit for $14.5 billion. [More]

Researchers aim at developing mobile phone app that can diagnose cancer

Plans to design a smart phone app that can detect leukaemia will be among the innovations presented by Northumbria University researchers at the Centre for Life this weekend. [More]
Ockham to partner with Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to increase commitment to cancer philanthropy

Ockham to partner with Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to increase commitment to cancer philanthropy

Ockham Development will partner with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of North Carolina chapter during 2014 to increase its commitment to cancer-directed philanthropy and collaborate with the Society to support the company's personal health and fitness goals. [More]
Scientists uncover key mechanism that regulates nerve cell growth in damaged nervous system

Scientists uncover key mechanism that regulates nerve cell growth in damaged nervous system

New research published today out of the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute uncovers a mechanism to promote growth in damaged nerve cells as a means to restore connections after injury. Dr. Doug Zochodne and his team have discovered a key molecule that directly regulates nerve cell growth in the damaged nervous system. [More]
ACR, SBI oppose NEJM article on ending breast cancer screening programs

ACR, SBI oppose NEJM article on ending breast cancer screening programs

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) agree with statements by Andorno and J√ľni, in their recent article published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), that women need clear information with which to discuss mammography with their doctor. [More]
Study explains biological processes of malignant cancer cells

Study explains biological processes of malignant cancer cells

Cancer cells may be known for their uncontrollable growth and spread, but they also differ from normal tissue in another manner: how they produce energy. [More]
Study evaluates stigma and public perceptions related to lung cancer

Study evaluates stigma and public perceptions related to lung cancer

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer? [More]
Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

While 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions, only 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns' genomes. [More]
SIRT1 protein necessary for telomere elongation and genome integrity during cell reprogramming

SIRT1 protein necessary for telomere elongation and genome integrity during cell reprogramming

Cell reprogramming converts specialised cells such as nerve cells or skin cells towards an embryonic stem cell state. This reversal in the evolutionary development of cells also requires a reversal in the biology of telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of chromosomes; whilst under normal conditions telomeres shorten over time, during cell reprogramming they follow the opposite strategy and increase in length. [More]

States have limited time for decision on setting up marketplaces

Meanwhile, other outlets look at the deadline enrollment surge and its possible effect on health care costs. [More]
Self-expanding activities may help you quit smoking

Self-expanding activities may help you quit smoking

If you are trying to quit smoking one method to incorporate is to do new, exciting "self-expanding" activities that can help with nicotine craving. This is the take-home message from a new study published online in PLOS ONE by a team of researchers including Arthur Aron, PhD, a Research Professor in the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University. [More]

New genetic evidence strengthens link between role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression

Scientists have shown new genetic evidence that could strengthen the link between the role of dietary fats with colon cancer progression. [More]