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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

Mortality rates vary depending on socioeconomic differences among areas in Europe

For a number of years now, scientific literature has questioned whether mortality rates depend on socioeconomic differences among the population. Recently, a new study carried out in 15 European cities - including Barcelona and Madrid - detected inequalities for the majority of causes, concluding that higher levels of poverty are associated with higher mortality rates and there is a great deal of variation among areas. [More]
Scientists identify mechanism that reveals why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions

Scientists identify mechanism that reveals why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists collaborating with University of Michigan researchers have found a previously unidentified mechanism that helps explain why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions but their offspring do not. [More]
Researchers make significant progress in improving survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas

Researchers make significant progress in improving survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas

Using clinical data collected over the past decade through a U.S. cancer registry, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that significant strides have been made in improving the survival of adult patients with low-grade gliomas, a slow-growing yet deadly form of primary brain cancer. [More]
Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health and Catholic Health Initiatives have completed the transfer of ownership of CHI's affiliate, St. Joseph Regional Health Network (St. Joseph) in Reading, Pa., to Penn State Health. [More]
NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

A researcher at North Dakota State University, Fargo, is receiving a four-year $1.35 million research project grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health to develop a targeted treatment for colorectal cancer. [More]
SENRI Trial: NK1 antagonists may prevent emesis in patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

SENRI Trial: NK1 antagonists may prevent emesis in patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

The SENRI trial has opened the window to evaluate NK1 antagonists for emesis prevention in patients taking oxaliplatin chemotherapy, antiemetics expert and ESMO spokesperson Fausto Roila said, putting into perspective the results of a Japanese study presented today at the ESMO 17th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2015 in Barcelona. [More]
Experts call for healthy lifestyle initiatives to combat non-communicable diseases

Experts call for healthy lifestyle initiatives to combat non-communicable diseases

A group of the world's top doctors and scientists working in cardiology and preventive medicine have issued a call to action to tackle the global problem of deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as heart problems, diabetes and cancer, through healthy lifestyle initiatives. [More]
BIDMC leaders urge hospitals to eliminate emotional harms that damage patients’ dignity

BIDMC leaders urge hospitals to eliminate emotional harms that damage patients’ dignity

Hospitals have made significant strides to reduce or eliminate physical harm to patients since the landmark 1999 Institute of Medicine Report "To Err is Human." [More]
Cancer Council Queensland urges women to be breast aware between scheduled screenings

Cancer Council Queensland urges women to be breast aware between scheduled screenings

Hundreds of Queensland women are developing breast cancers between screening each year, prompting a warning from Cancer Council for women to be breast aware between mammograms. [More]
Domainex’s new integrated bioassay service platform accelerates progression of drug discovery projects

Domainex’s new integrated bioassay service platform accelerates progression of drug discovery projects

Domainex Ltd, a private drug discovery service company, today announces that it is launching an integrated bioassay service platform, BioassayBuilder. [More]
Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

A new analysis of dietary patterns among more than 100,000 Americans suggests that frequent consumption of citrus -- namely whole grapefruit and orange juice -- may be associated with an increased risk of melanoma. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
July issue of JACR highlights cancer imaging status, breast imaging performance

July issue of JACR highlights cancer imaging status, breast imaging performance

The July 2015 issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR) highlights residency breast imaging training as it applies to tomosynthesis, the status of cancer imaging, and the quality and cost effect of patient movement during MRI. [More]
Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Substituting deuterium for certain hydrogen atoms in molecules has been shown to enhance the metabolic properties of a number of drugs and provides a promising approach to the discovery and development of innovative drug products. [More]
Low BMI linked to poorer survival in advanced colorectal cancer

Low BMI linked to poorer survival in advanced colorectal cancer

Although being overweight with a high body-mass index (BMI) has long been associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer, thinner patients might not fare as well after treatment for advanced cancer, according to a new study from Duke Medicine. [More]
Two-thirds of patients with T4a larynx cancer not receiving total laryngectomy

Two-thirds of patients with T4a larynx cancer not receiving total laryngectomy

Despite findings of previous studies and published guidelines, nearly two-thirds of patients with T4a larynx ("voice box") cancer are not receiving a total laryngectomy (surgical removal of the larynx), the recommended form of treatment, and as a result, have significantly worse survival rates versus those treated with a total laryngectomy, a new study published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics by experts at Penn Medicine found. [More]
Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have completed the first clinical trial of a new treatment for children suffering from neuroblastoma. In a clinical trial led by Giselle Sholler, MD, pediatric oncologist at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital and the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium (NMTRC), DFMO, an investigational agent, showed minimal side effects with long-term survival of three patients. [More]
Sociable strolls key to achieve improved health

Sociable strolls key to achieve improved health

A study by Sheffield Hallam University into short health walks has found that their success primarily hinges on social factors. The research shows that being able to socialise and enjoy company are key ways to achieve long-term behaviour change and improved health. [More]
Subcutaneous administration increases tolerability of multispecific antibody tumor treatment

Subcutaneous administration increases tolerability of multispecific antibody tumor treatment

Tumor treatment with multispecific antibodies is significantly more tolerable if administered subcutaneously rather than via the bloodstream, which was the standard procedure until now. This was the result of an animal model study undertaken by researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München in cooperation with the Munich biotech company Trion Research. [More]
Leicester researchers introduce alternative method to diagnose cause of death

Leicester researchers introduce alternative method to diagnose cause of death

Researchers from the University of Leicester and University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust have introduced an alternative method to diagnose the cause of death, which in many cases can replace the need for the traditional invasive autopsy. This can be purchased by the family and will be performed within the NHS hospitals. [More]
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