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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Study reveals how attitudes, beliefs of cancer patients drive complementary and alternative medicine use

Study reveals how attitudes, beliefs of cancer patients drive complementary and alternative medicine use

A new study has shed light on how cancer patients' attitudes and beliefs drive the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help hospitals develop more effective and accessible integrative oncology services for patients. [More]
Overweight teens have double the chances of developing bowel cancer in middle age

Overweight teens have double the chances of developing bowel cancer in middle age

Being very overweight in your teens may double the risk of developing bowel cancer by the time you are middle aged, suggests research published online in the journal Gut. [More]
Researchers discover new gene subgroup that drives prostate cancer

Researchers discover new gene subgroup that drives prostate cancer

Prostate cancer researchers have drawn a molecular portrait that provides the first complete picture of localized, multi-focal disease within the prostate and also unveils a new gene subgroup driving it. [More]
TGen professor to receive top award from Arizona Medical Association

TGen professor to receive top award from Arizona Medical Association

Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief of the Translational Genomics Research Institute, will receive one of the top awards May 29 from the Arizona Medical Association. [More]
Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experienced significantly less toxic side effects than patients treated with older radiation therapies. [More]
Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

Microfluidic cell-squeezing device could introduce specific antigens inside immune system's B cells

MIT researchers have shown that they can use a microfluidic cell-squeezing device to introduce specific antigens inside the immune system's B cells, providing a new approach to developing and implementing antigen-presenting cell vaccines. [More]
Clinical genomic sequencing could impact treatment decisions in advanced prostate cancer patients

Clinical genomic sequencing could impact treatment decisions in advanced prostate cancer patients

An international collaboration of researchers are advancing precision medicine to men with advanced prostate cancer. [More]
nTMS analysis of motor areas improves prognosis of patients with malignant brain tumors

nTMS analysis of motor areas improves prognosis of patients with malignant brain tumors

A method known as navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has been gaining importance in neurosurgery for some time now. [More]
TGen and Baylor partnership set to increase treatment options for cancer patients

TGen and Baylor partnership set to increase treatment options for cancer patients

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Baylor Research Institute (BRI) at Dallas today announce an agreement that will focus on accelerating early detection and treatments for patients with a broad range of cancers. [More]
Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample. [More]
LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

Celiac disease-safe wheat, premature infant pain detection, and new medicines to fight flu and cancer are among the ideas to receive $2.9 million in funding from Washington's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF). [More]
Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Scientists and clinicians on the Norwich Research Park have carried out the first detailed study of how our intestinal tract changes as we age, and how this determines our overall health. [More]
Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Researchers have designed a nanoparticle-based therapy that is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

Johns Hopkins scientists safely use immune cells to treat multiple myeloma

In a report on what is believed to be the first small clinical trial of its kind, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have safely used immune cells grown from patients' own bone marrow to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer of white blood cells. [More]

Canada lagging behind similar OECD countries with regard to public drug plan reimbursement

Canadians face wait times of over 460 days in order to get access to new, potentially lifesaving medicines in public drug plans, according to a new IMS Brogan report commissioned by Rx&D. Overall, the report ranks Canada 16 out of 18 similar OECD countries. [More]
Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Second-generation antibiotic shows promise against common bacterial infections

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a second-generation antibiotic that shows early effectiveness against common bacterial infections that pose a serious health threat to children and adults. [More]
DF/BWCC introduces new website to provide information about precision cancer medicine

DF/BWCC introduces new website to provide information about precision cancer medicine

Precision cancer medicine - diagnosis and treatment based on the genetic abnormalities of a specific tumor - is playing an ever-larger role in cancer care. The field got a boost earlier this year when President Barack Obama proposed a $215 million federal Precision Medicine Initiative with cancer as one of its priorities. [More]
Endomag named finalist for Royal Academy of Engineering's MacRobert Award

Endomag named finalist for Royal Academy of Engineering's MacRobert Award

Cancer healthcare company Endomag has been revealed as a finalist for the UK’s most prestigious engineering award. Endomag, which was shortlisted for its innovative breast cancer staging diagnostic system Sentimag and Sienna+, is one of three companies up for the MacRobert Award from the Royal Academy of Engineering. [More]
Non-coding micro RNA molecule may control chemotherapy resistance among ovarian cancer patients

Non-coding micro RNA molecule may control chemotherapy resistance among ovarian cancer patients

A molecule that helps control gene expression may play a role in controlling chemotherapy resistance among patients with the most common form of ovarian cancer. [More]
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