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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Study: Selenium compounds appear to have beneficial effect on cancer

Study: Selenium compounds appear to have beneficial effect on cancer

The immune system is designed to remove things not normally found in the body. Cells undergoing change, e.g. precursors of cancer cells, are therefore normally recognised and removed by the immune system. Unfortunately, the different cancer cells contain mechanisms that block the immune system's ability to recognise them, allowing them to freely continue cancer development. [More]
Study shows effectiveness of VolitionRx’s NuQ test in detecting lung cancer in blood and sputum

Study shows effectiveness of VolitionRx’s NuQ test in detecting lung cancer in blood and sputum

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing diagnostic tests for cancer and other conditions, today announced that data from its pilot lung cancer study will be presented at the Science for Business BioWin Day 2014, being held November 26, 2014 in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. [More]
Researchers reveal how cancer cells succeed at entrapping genetic program of growth inhibition

Researchers reveal how cancer cells succeed at entrapping genetic program of growth inhibition

Healthy cells reduce their growth when there is a lack of oxygen (hypoxia). This makes it even more surprising that hypoxia is a characteristic feature of malignant tumours. In two publications in the current edition of the "Nature Communications" journal, researchers from Goethe University and Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen report on how cancer cells succeed at circumventing the genetic program of growth inhibition. [More]
Oxford BioTherapeutics, Menarini Group initiate phase I study of OBT357 (MEN1112) for AML treatment

Oxford BioTherapeutics, Menarini Group initiate phase I study of OBT357 (MEN1112) for AML treatment

Oxford BioTherapeutics and Berlin Chemie/ Menarini Biotech/ Menarini Ricerche (belonging to Menarini Group) announce today that they have initiated the first-in-human clinical study of OBT357 (MEN1112), a novel enhanced antibody for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

New Mayo Clinic study shows impact of long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

Before reaching for that daily antacid, you might consider what it's doing to the trillions of bugs living in your gut. A new Mayo Clinic study in the open access journal Microbiome shows that people who regularly take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have less diversity among their gut bacteria, putting them at increased risk for infections like clostridium difficile and pneumonia, in addition to vitamin deficiencies and bone fractures. [More]
Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six faculty members at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 401 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. [More]
Breast size differences have significant mental health impact in adolescent girls

Breast size differences have significant mental health impact in adolescent girls

Differences in breast size have a significant mental health impact in adolescent girls, affecting self-esteem, emotional well-being, and social functioning, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Marlo Thomas honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Marlo Thomas honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Today, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital® National Outreach Director, Marlo Thomas, was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, during a special ceremony at the White House. [More]
Provider-centered multi-component PI CME intervention improves HPV vaccination rates

Provider-centered multi-component PI CME intervention improves HPV vaccination rates

Changing the way doctors practice medicine is difficult, however a new study has shown that combining traditional education with quality improvement and incentives improves Human Papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rates in boys and girls. The study, which appears on-line in the journal Vaccine, has the potential to produce sustained improvements in these vaccination rates. [More]
Adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants perform better on tasks, study finds

Adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants perform better on tasks, study finds

Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life. [More]
Rice University researchers model dynamic instability of microtubules

Rice University researchers model dynamic instability of microtubules

New computer models that show how microtubules age are the first to match experimental results and help explain the dynamic processes behind an essential component of every living cell, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

High blood pressure and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two emerging health problems related to the epidemic of childhood obesity. In a recent study, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine sought to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure in children with NAFLD, which places them at risk for premature cardiovascular disease. [More]
New approach to fighting breast, thyroid cancers

New approach to fighting breast, thyroid cancers

A team of researchers from the University of Alberta has discovered a new approach to fighting breast and thyroid cancers by targeting an enzyme they say is the culprit for the "vicious cycle" of tumour growth, spread and resistance to treatment. [More]
Nodule volume, doubling time stratifies lung cancer risk

Nodule volume, doubling time stratifies lung cancer risk

An interim analysis of the NELSON study reveals the significance of nodule size and volume doubling time for the risk of cancer in patients who have undergone low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening. [More]
Dacomitinib ‘not superior’ to erlotinib in advanced NSCLC

Dacomitinib ‘not superior’ to erlotinib in advanced NSCLC

Dacomitinib, an irreversible, pan-epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, does not improve outcomes compared with the first-generation EGFR–TKI erlotinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, irrespective of their KRAS mutation status, finds the ARCHER 1009 study. [More]
Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Authors review current progress in developing transgenic pig models for human diseases

Genetically engineered pigs, minipigs, and microminipigs are valuable tools for biomedical research, as their lifespan, anatomy, physiology, genetic make-up, and disease mechanisms are more similar to humans than the rodent models typically used in drug discovery research. [More]
Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. [More]
Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, NewLink Genetics sign exclusive worldwide license agreement for Ebola vaccine candidate

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, and NewLink Genetics Corporation, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute NewLink's investigational rVSV-EBOV (Ebola) vaccine candidate. [More]
Endo announces acquisition of rights to Natesto (testosterone nasal gel)

Endo announces acquisition of rights to Natesto (testosterone nasal gel)

Endo International plc, announced today the acquisition of rights to Natesto (testosterone nasal gel), the first and only testosterone nasal gel for replacement therapy in adult males diagnosed with hypogonadism, from Trimel BioPharma SRL, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Trimel Pharmaceuticals Corporation. [More]
Phone counseling can help hazardous-drinking smokers quit smoking

Phone counseling can help hazardous-drinking smokers quit smoking

Smokers who drink heavily have a tougher time quitting cigarettes than smokers who drink moderately or not at all. However, a multi-center study led by researchers in Yale Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine found that modifying tobacco-oriented telephone counseling to help hazardous drinkers can help them quit smoking. [More]