Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Cancer News and Research Twitter

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

UConn chemists develop more advanced peanut allergy test

Current peanut allergy tests are not very reliable when it comes to diagnosing the severity of an individual's allergic reaction, which can range from hives to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. [More]
Study: Persistent insomnia increases mortality risk

Study: Persistent insomnia increases mortality risk

A connection between persistent insomnia and increased inflammation and mortality has been identified by a group of researchers from the University of Arizona. Their study, published in The American Journal of Medicine, found that people who suffer from persistent insomnia are at greater risk than those who experience intermittent insomnia. [More]
Pediatric patients who receive quick antibiotics for fever, neutropenia have reduced PICU needs

Pediatric patients who receive quick antibiotics for fever, neutropenia have reduced PICU needs

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer shows that pediatric cancer patients who receive antibiotics within 60 minutes of reporting fever and showing neutropenia (low neutrophil count), go on to have decreased intensive care consultation rate and lower mortality compared with patients who receive antibiotics outside the 60-minute window. [More]
Varian reports progress towards making advanced treatments available for cancer patients in Africa

Varian reports progress towards making advanced treatments available for cancer patients in Africa

Varian Medical Systems, world leader in radiation therapy, is today reporting progress towards its goal of making advanced treatments systems more available for cancer patients across Africa. The company is presenting to government and healthcare leaders at the 2nd Africa Healthcare Summit. [More]
Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Boosting anti-cancer immunity through diet and novel drug therapies—that's the idea behind a collaborative project involving researchers from the South Dakota State University College of Pharmacy and Sanford Research in Sioux Falls. [More]
Study suggests benefits of calorie restriction on healthy aging

Study suggests benefits of calorie restriction on healthy aging

Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake, suggests new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
TSRI scientists show how to target weak spots of Marburg virus with future treatments

TSRI scientists show how to target weak spots of Marburg virus with future treatments

Marburg virus is Ebola's deadly cousin. The virus is up to 90 percent lethal—and doctors are desperate for tools to fight it. [More]
STS releases first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from CHSD

STS releases first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from CHSD

Continuing its commitment to increase public awareness and understanding of cardiothoracic surgical outcomes, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released the first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from its Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD). [More]
Researchers discover that cell's skeleton can trigger cell multiplication

Researchers discover that cell's skeleton can trigger cell multiplication

A research team from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC; Portugal), led by Florence Janody, in collaboration with Nicolas Tapon from London Research Institute (LRI; UK), discovered that the cell's skeleton can trigger the multiplication of cells through the action of proteins that control cellular rigidity. [More]
EORTC researchers review potential treatment options for patients with locally advanced breast cancer

EORTC researchers review potential treatment options for patients with locally advanced breast cancer

Treating patients with locally advanced inoperable breast cancer is an extremely difficult task. The overwhelming majority of patients treated for this disease suffer relapse and, despite the best multimodal treatment, do not survive. There is a medical need to examine current and potential treatments, and EORTC researchers have recently published an article in Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology concerning this topic. [More]
Targeting stroma could potentially extend survival of pancreatic cancer patients

Targeting stroma could potentially extend survival of pancreatic cancer patients

Like a stealth jet cloaks itself from radar, cancer cells cloak themselves within tumors by hiding behind a dense layer of cellular material known as stroma. [More]
New cancer drug enters phase I clinical trials in humans

New cancer drug enters phase I clinical trials in humans

A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma. [More]
Researchers report that 15% of pancreatic cancer patients may benefit from personalized therapies

Researchers report that 15% of pancreatic cancer patients may benefit from personalized therapies

Cancer researchers at Indiana University report that about 15 percent of people with pancreatic cancer may benefit from therapy targeting a newly identified gene signature. [More]
New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

A new interactive online tool helps educate practicing oncologists worldwide with therapeutic decision-making for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on a patient's molecular and clinical characteristics by providing feedback from an expert panel. [More]
Simple urine test could guide clinicians to better treat bladder cancer patients

Simple urine test could guide clinicians to better treat bladder cancer patients

Researchers at the University of Birmingham believe that a simple urine test could help to guide clinicians in the treatment of bladder cancer patients. [More]
Researchers one step closer to understanding development of glioblastoma

Researchers one step closer to understanding development of glioblastoma

Glioblastomas are a highly aggressive type of brain tumor, with few effective treatment options. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are one step closer to understanding glioblastoma development following the identification of a key protein signaling pathway involved in brain tumor stem cell growth and survival. [More]
ABIVAX doses first patient in ABX203 Phase IIb/III trial for treatment of chronic hepatitis B

ABIVAX doses first patient in ABX203 Phase IIb/III trial for treatment of chronic hepatitis B

ABIVAX, a clinical stage biotech company developing and commercialising anti-viral compounds and human vaccines, today announced that it has dosed in New Zealand the first patient in a Phase IIb/III clinical trial of ABX203 which is taking place in several countries of the Asia-Pacific region. [More]
Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection has been approved by the European Commission for the treatment of visual impairment due to Macular Edema secondary to Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). [More]
Noble Hospital surgeon to present work on new breast cancer device at Miami Breast Cancer Conference

Noble Hospital surgeon to present work on new breast cancer device at Miami Breast Cancer Conference

A Noble Hospital breast surgeon's work with a new device that improves treatment of breast cancers will be featured later this month at a prestigious international medical conference. [More]