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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

The flu jab is associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today in a late breaking trial session at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure. [More]
Ongoing treatment with nivolumab shows benefit in advanced kidney cancer patients

Ongoing treatment with nivolumab shows benefit in advanced kidney cancer patients

Only 12% of kidney cancer patients with advanced disease survive five years after their initial treatment. In a Roswell Park Cancer Institute-led study, scientists report that some patients with advanced kidney cancer who continued to receive a novel immunotherapy drug after their disease progressed saw clinical benefit. [More]
Chemical compound eCF506 may be highly effective at blocking growth of breast cancer cells

Chemical compound eCF506 may be highly effective at blocking growth of breast cancer cells

A drug for breast cancer that is more effective than existing medicines may be a step closer thanks to new research. [More]
Women's group lobbies lawmakers to fund Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program

Women's group lobbies lawmakers to fund Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program

On May 12th, the Metropolitan Chicago Breast Cancer Task Force traveled to Springfield, Illinois to lobby lawmakers to fully fund the Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program, which provides free mammograms and Pap testing for uninsured women aged 35 to 64. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Study highlights need for support services to address reproductive concerns of female cancer survivors

Study highlights need for support services to address reproductive concerns of female cancer survivors

A new study indicates that many young adult female cancer survivors do not receive adequate information about their fertility as part of their survivorship care after completing treatment, despite having concerns about their ability to bear children in the future. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
Study shows young adult female cancer survivors do not receive adequate information about their fertility

Study shows young adult female cancer survivors do not receive adequate information about their fertility

A new study indicates that many young adult female cancer survivors do not receive adequate information about their fertility as part of their survivorship care after completing treatment, despite having concerns about their ability to bear children in the future. [More]
Could a new test improve bowel cancer screening uptake? An interview with Professor Halloran

Could a new test improve bowel cancer screening uptake? An interview with Professor Halloran

The most recent complete data for England (2014/15) shows an average uptake of the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood Tests (gFOBT) from those invited by the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) of 58.22%. [More]
Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response - a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases. [More]
Cornell researchers develop nanoparticle-based drug delivery mechanism for combination cancer therapy

Cornell researchers develop nanoparticle-based drug delivery mechanism for combination cancer therapy

A team of researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York demonstrated a drug delivery mechanism that utilizes two independent vehicles, allowing for delivery of chemically and physically dis-tinct agents. [More]
Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Researchers identify potential ways in which cancer cells may develop resistance to BET inhibitors

Researchers identify potential ways in which cancer cells may develop resistance to BET inhibitors

A team of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers has worked out how a new class of anti-cancer drugs kills cancer cells, a finding that helps explain how cancer cells may become resistant to treatment. [More]
Study: One-third of patients hospitalised with heart failure do not return to work

Study: One-third of patients hospitalised with heart failure do not return to work

One-third of patients hospitalised with heart failure for the first time have not returned to work one year later, reveals a study in nearly 12 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Rasmus Roerth, a physician at Copenhagen University Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark. [More]
New spectral triangulation system may help pinpoint targeted cancer tumors

New spectral triangulation system may help pinpoint targeted cancer tumors

Bathing a patient in LED light may someday offer a new way to locate tumors, according to Rice University researchers. [More]
Researchers genetically modify microalgae to form complex molecules

Researchers genetically modify microalgae to form complex molecules

Researchers from Copenhagen Plant Science Centre at University of Copenhagen have succeeded in manipulating a strain of microalgae to form complex molecules to an unprecedented extent. [More]
Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found. [More]
Combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may be effective against ovarian cancer

Combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy may be effective against ovarian cancer

Inside each ovarian tumor, there are good cells and bad cells: The bad cells are fibroblasts. They work to block chemotherapy, which is why nearly every woman with ovarian cancer becomes resistant to treatment. [More]
Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Obesity is on the rise throughout the world, and in some developed countries two-third of the adult population is either overweight or obese. This brings with it an increased risk of serious conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and osteoarthritis. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
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