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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
New research findings on Graves' disease to be highlighted at ATA meeting

New research findings on Graves' disease to be highlighted at ATA meeting

A unique mouse model of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism, and new research findings that may help improve the treatment of Graves' disease will be highlighted in oral and poster presentations at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association, October 29-November 2, 2014, in Coronado, California. [More]
International Aspirin Foundation introduces two biennial awards

International Aspirin Foundation introduces two biennial awards

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of the formation of The International Aspirin Foundation, we are delighted to announce the introduction of two biennial awards; a Senior Science Award and a Young Investigator Award. [More]
NCI supports further clinical development of next-generation HPV vaccine

NCI supports further clinical development of next-generation HPV vaccine

The National Cancer Institute in the USA is supporting the new vaccine developed at the MedUni Vienna against the human papillomavirus (HPV) with at least US$ 3.5 million. This is a major success for the developers and means that the foundations can now be laid for the clinical trials needed for licensing as a vaccine. [More]
Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World Scientific Publishing Company. [More]
Kiadis Pharma's ATIR product receives EMA's ODD for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

Kiadis Pharma's ATIR product receives EMA's ODD for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

Kiadis Pharma B.V., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing T-cell immunotherapy treatments for blood cancers, today announces that its lead product ATIR has been granted Orphan Drug Designation (ODD) by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
STS releases new clinical practice guidelines for treating esophageal cancer

STS releases new clinical practice guidelines for treating esophageal cancer

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released new clinical practice guidelines for treating cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (area where the esophagus meets the stomach). [More]
FIT screening may be as effective as colonoscopy in detecting familial colorectal cancer

FIT screening may be as effective as colonoscopy in detecting familial colorectal cancer

Fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) may be as effective as colonoscopies when it comes to detecting colorectal cancer among first-degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Prof. Mary-Claire King receives 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science

Prof. Mary-Claire King receives 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science

At a ceremony held in New York City on September 19, 2014, leading geneticist and humanitarian Prof. Mary-Claire King, the American Cancer Society Professor of Genome Sciences and Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle and 2008 Honorary Doctor of Philosophy of Tel Aviv University, was awarded the 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science. [More]
Golden Jubilee National Hospital holds performance review in public

Golden Jubilee National Hospital holds performance review in public

Today, the Golden Jubilee National Hospital held its Annual Review, demonstrating that they have continued to lead the way in safe, effective and person centred care for the NHS in Scotland. [More]
Efforts to roll back school nutritional standards could jeopardize gains made against childhood obesity

Efforts to roll back school nutritional standards could jeopardize gains made against childhood obesity

Efforts to roll back current nutritional standards for the National School Lunch Program could jeopardize gains made in the fight against childhood obesity, write the authors of an article that will appear in the November 13 New England Journal of Medicine and has been released online. [More]
UCLA scientists find link between gigaxonin protein and HPV-positive head and neck cancers

UCLA scientists find link between gigaxonin protein and HPV-positive head and neck cancers

UCLA scientists have discovered for the first time that a protein usually linked to rare neurological disorders is also associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) positive head and neck cancers. The protein was also shown to help improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments, laying the groundwork for the development of more specialized therapies. [More]
Study: Certain prostate cancer medications linked to cardiac death risk

Study: Certain prostate cancer medications linked to cardiac death risk

A new study has found that certain prostate cancer medications are linked with an increased risk of dying from heart-related causes in men with congestive heart failure or prior heart attacks. Published in BJU International, the findings will help doctors and patients weigh the benefits and risks of the drugs. [More]
Major research project aims to reduce chances of hair loss after chemotherapy treatment

Major research project aims to reduce chances of hair loss after chemotherapy treatment

Cancer suffers who lose their hair as a consequence of chemotherapy will benefit from a major research project that will improve the scalp cooling technology that prevents hair loss. [More]
Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer. [More]
UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. [More]
New standard of care for pediatric AML patients who receive umbilical cord transplants

New standard of care for pediatric AML patients who receive umbilical cord transplants

A new standard of care for children facing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may be clear, following a multi-year study published in the latest edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
New study reveals link between aristolochic acid and kidney cancer

New study reveals link between aristolochic acid and kidney cancer

A new study on a large cohort of kidney cancer patients in Europe sheds light on the genetic architecture of the disease -- and reveals an apparent link between exposure to aristolochic acid and incidence of kidney cancer, particularly in Romania. [More]
Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. [More]
New international consortium to advance GPCR research for drug development

New international consortium to advance GPCR research for drug development

The generation of high-resolution pictures of hundreds of medically important proteins known as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) will be the goal of an ambitious new international partnership. Called the GPCR Consortium, this non-profit initiative brings together major pharmaceutical companies and leading research institutes from three continents to advance GPCR research for drug development. [More]
Rapamycin and dasatinib combination may be beneficial in treating breast cancer, say scientists

Rapamycin and dasatinib combination may be beneficial in treating breast cancer, say scientists

The uncontrolled growth of cancer cells arises from their ability to hijack the cell’s normal growth program and checkpoints. Usually after therapy, a second cancer-signaling pathway will open after the primary one shuts down — creating an ingenious escape route for the cancer cell to survive. The answer, say Case Western Reserve researchers, is to anticipate and block that back-up track by prescribing two drugs from the start. [More]