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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain broadcast message throughout the cerebral cortex

Cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain broadcast message throughout the cerebral cortex

When a large combat unit, widely dispersed in dense jungle, goes to battle, no single soldier knows precisely how his actions are affecting the unit's success or failure. But in modern armies, every soldier is connected via an audio link that can instantly receive broadcasts - reporting both positive and negative surprises - based on new intelligence. The real-time broadcasts enable dispersed troops to learn from these reports and can be critical since no solider has an overview of the entire unit's situation. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
Robotically-steered flexible needles may improve diagnostic and therapeutic procedures

Robotically-steered flexible needles may improve diagnostic and therapeutic procedures

Robotically steering flexible needles can reach their intended target in tissue with sub-millimetre level accuracy. This has been demonstrated by the doctoral research of Momen Abayazid, who is affiliated with the research institute MIRA of the University of Twente. An major advantage of steering flexible needles is that one can avoid obstacles or sensitive tissues and can re-orient the path of the needle in real time as you insert the needle. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma announces Q2 financial results for 2015, updates drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma announces Q2 financial results for 2015, updates drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, today reported financial results for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and updates on its drug development programs. [More]
LLS, Light The Night National Corporate Partner Teams make positive impact on patients' lives

LLS, Light The Night National Corporate Partner Teams make positive impact on patients' lives

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is working with thousands of national partners, sponsors and corporate teams to fund lifesaving research and support for people battling cancer through the Light The Night Walk. Together with LLS, the Light The Night National Corporate Partner Teams are raising awareness and making a positive impact on the lives of patients today, literally, by taking steps to save lives. [More]
Despite increased life expectancy, British people suffer from more medical ailments

Despite increased life expectancy, British people suffer from more medical ailments

People in the UK are living longer but are coping with more medical ailments causing illness or disability in their older years, according to a major new international study published in The Lancet today (Thursday 27 August). [More]
Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

While most primary care physicians responding to a survey taken in late 2014 and early 2015 expressed confidence in their ability to identify potential cases of Ebola and communicate Ebola risks to their patients, only 50 to 70 percent of them gave answers that fit with CDC guidelines when asked how they would care for hypothetical patients who might have been exposed to Ebola. [More]
Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year — mainly those with impaired immune systems due to AIDS, cancer treatment or an organ transplant. [More]
Genetic test that predicts recurrence of breast cancer may impact use of chemotherapy

Genetic test that predicts recurrence of breast cancer may impact use of chemotherapy

A genetic test that helps predict whether some women's breast cancer will recur might influence how chemotherapy is used, according to a study from Duke Medicine. [More]
Virtua to bring high-quality wellness services to residents of Brandywine Senior Living at Haddonfield

Virtua to bring high-quality wellness services to residents of Brandywine Senior Living at Haddonfield

Virtua has partnered with Brandywine Senior Living at Haddonfield to bring high-quality medical care, rehabilitation therapy, and wellness services to residents of the new assisted living community located at 132 Warwick Road. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism responsible for development of adrenal gland tumors

Scientists uncover mechanism responsible for development of adrenal gland tumors

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have elucidated a mechanism that is responsible for the development of adrenal gland tumors. They discovered that the BMP7 protein plays a key role in this process and that it could be a possible target for future treatments. The results have been published in the journal 'Oncotarget'. [More]
Researchers identify drugs that may enhance ability of TKI dasatinib to kill human cancer cells

Researchers identify drugs that may enhance ability of TKI dasatinib to kill human cancer cells

Researchers have discovered how a common mutation in a high-risk leukemia subtype drives the cancer's aggressiveness and have identified drugs that may work with existing precision medicines to improve survival. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which was published online today in the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse - have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection. [More]
New study provides framework for establishing value-based pricing for new cancer drugs

New study provides framework for establishing value-based pricing for new cancer drugs

At a time when cancer drug prices are rising rapidly, an innovative new study provides the framework for establishing value-based pricing for all new oncology drugs entering the marketplace. Using a highly sophisticated economic model, researchers from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology used an example of a new lung cancer drug. [More]
Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

Adaptive immune system plays active role in guiding development of mammary glands

In experiments with mouse tissue, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the adaptive immune system, generally associated with fighting bacterial and viral infections, plays an active role in guiding the normal development of mammary glands, the only organs--in female humans as well as mice--that develop predominately after birth, beginning at puberty. [More]
New review article reveals Y chromosome’s role in cardiovascular and immune function, cancer

New review article reveals Y chromosome’s role in cardiovascular and immune function, cancer

The role of sex in human disease is a growing area of research. Although estrogen (in females) and androgens (in males) are often seen as possible causes for such differences, sex chromosomes, including the male-specific Y chromosome, may also play a role. However, it has been difficult to understand how the Y chromosome could contribute to disease in men, in part because it is much more difficult to sequence than all other chromosomes. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
History of oral contraceptive use influences survival in ovarian cancer patients

History of oral contraceptive use influences survival in ovarian cancer patients

A history of oral contraceptive use and having at least one child increased longevity by nearly three years in patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, according to a Roswell Park Cancer Institute study recently published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. [More]
SLU study finds that length of stay in ED makes no real difference in mortality of trauma patient

SLU study finds that length of stay in ED makes no real difference in mortality of trauma patient

The amount of time a trauma patient stays in the emergency department (ED) makes no real difference in the patient's mortality, researchers at Saint Louis University found in a recent study. [More]
Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Scientists generate pluripotent stem cells with more stable genomes

Damaged tissue, such as pancreas, heart, and neuronal tissue, which is regenerated to treat cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or neurodegenerative diseases. This is one of the ambitious scenarios to which regenerative medicine aspires and that is being announced as one of the great promises of twenty-first century biomedicine for the treatment of a long list of diseases affecting people today. [More]
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