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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Broach Foundation makes $5 million commitment to support glioblastoma multiforme research

Broach Foundation makes $5 million commitment to support glioblastoma multiforme research

The Broach Foundation for Brain Cancer Research has made a $5 million commitment to support glioblastoma multiforme research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski. [More]
Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

High-dose opioid prescribing increased by 23 per cent in Canada between 2006 and 2011, despite clinical guidelines recommending that most patients should avoid high-doses of these drugs, according to new research. [More]
ONCOblot expands into international territories

ONCOblot expands into international territories

The ONCOblot- Test, a highly sensitive blood test for cancer, has now expanded into international territories; bringing much needed support for early cancer detection to areas beyond The United States. [More]
Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites

Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites

Postmenopausal women with diverse gut bacteria exhibit a more favorable ratio of estrogen metabolites, which is associated with reduced risk for breast cancer, compared to women with less microbial variation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). [More]
Lung cancer screening could save thousands, study suggests

Lung cancer screening could save thousands, study suggests

Experts from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have weighed up the pros and cons of lung cancer screening to determine whether Medicare-eligible individuals would actually benefit from annual testing. [More]
Researchers discover new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin

Researchers discover new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin

University at Buffalo researchers and colleagues studying a rare, blistering disease have discovered new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin. [More]
Cancer Research UK, CRT partner with Asterias to trail novel immunotherapy treatment for lung cancer

Cancer Research UK, CRT partner with Asterias to trail novel immunotherapy treatment for lung cancer

CANCER RESEARCH UK and Cancer Research Technology , the charity's development and commercialisation arm, have reached an agreement with Asterias Biotherapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company in the emerging field of regenerative medicine, to take forward Asterias' novel immunotherapy treatment AST-VAC2 into clinical trials in subjects with non-small cell lung cancer. [More]
Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

A team led by an Oregon Health & Science University researcher has sequenced and annotated the genome of the only ape whose DNA had yet to be sequenced - the gibbon, an endangered small ape that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. [More]
AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie today announced results from a Phase 3 pivotal study demonstrating that HUMIRA® (adalimumab) is effective in reducing common clinical signs and symptoms in moderate-to-severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), specifically the number of abscesses and inflammatory nodules. [More]
Incidence of thyroid cancer rising faster in Pennsylvania than in rest of the United States as a whole

Incidence of thyroid cancer rising faster in Pennsylvania than in rest of the United States as a whole

Incidence of thyroid cancer is rising faster in Pennsylvania than in the rest of the United States as a whole, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Scientists crack genetic code of liver fluke parasite

Singapore-An international team of scientists from Singapore, Thailand, China and Australia has cracked the genetic code of the liver fluke parasite, Opisthorchis viverrini, using a unique DNA analysis technique developed at A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS). [More]
New book brings awareness to debate surrounding stem cell research

New book brings awareness to debate surrounding stem cell research

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., leading publisher of over 80 science, technology, and medical publications, announced today the launch of first time hard cover title Inevitable Collision: The Inspiring Story that Brought Stem Cell Research to Conservative America, in an effort to bring awareness to the growing conversation and debate surrounding stem cell research and regenerative medicine. [More]
Professor receives award for development of anti-angiogenic therapy for retinal disease

Professor receives award for development of anti-angiogenic therapy for retinal disease

Napoleone Ferrara, MD, distinguished professor of pathology and distinguished adjunct professor of ophthalmology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and senior deputy director for basic sciences at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, was named today as one of seven recipients of the Ant-nio Champalimaud Vision Award in Lisbon, Portugal. [More]
MRI and PET techniques can help monitor response of bone metastases to treatment

MRI and PET techniques can help monitor response of bone metastases to treatment

Imaging technologies are very useful in evaluating a patient's response to cancer treatment, and this can be done quite effectively for most tumors using RECIST, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. [More]
Scientists develop "electronic skin" for earlier identification of breast cancer

Scientists develop "electronic skin" for earlier identification of breast cancer

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an "electronic skin" that "feels" and images small lumps that fingers can miss. [More]
Merck's Keytruda gets FDA approval for treatment of malignant melanoma

Merck's Keytruda gets FDA approval for treatment of malignant melanoma

The recent approval of Merck & Co.'s Keytruda by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of malignant melanoma is a significant milestone for Merck & Co. and for the oncology immunotherapy drug market. Decision Resources Group anticipates the launch of Keytruda as the first anti-PD-1 immunotherapy in the United States for treatment of advanced and unresectable malignant melanoma. [More]
Dell, Terascala and TGen to install genomic data management solution at NCI

Dell, Terascala and TGen to install genomic data management solution at NCI

Dell, Terascala and the Translational Genomics Research Institute are installing state-of-the-art computing and programing specialized for human genome investigations at the National Cancer Institute. [More]
UW Carbone Cancer Center treats patients with MRIdian MRI-guided radiation therapy system

UW Carbone Cancer Center treats patients with MRIdian MRI-guided radiation therapy system

The MRIdian (me-rid-i-an) system from ViewRay, a privately held medical device company, is now being used to treat patients at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center in Madison, Wisconsin, the second clinical group in the world to treat patients with MRI-guided radiation therapy. [More]
BioLight Life Sciences declares first sale of IOPtiMate system in Hong Kong

BioLight Life Sciences declares first sale of IOPtiMate system in Hong Kong

BioLight Life Sciences Investments Ltd., a firm that invests in, manages and commercializes biomedical innovations in ophthalmology and cancer diagnostics, announces the first sale of an IOPtiMate™ system in Hong Kong. [More]