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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
CeMM scientists develop new method by integrating CRISPR genome editing with single-cell sequencing

CeMM scientists develop new method by integrating CRISPR genome editing with single-cell sequencing

Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 "gene scissors" is a powerful tool for biological discovery and for identifying novel drug targets. [More]
RIT research explores impact of shear stress on cells moving through blood vessels

RIT research explores impact of shear stress on cells moving through blood vessels

How do cells and protein molecules respond to stress as they travel through blood vessels? Could resulting changes to these biological components impact how diseases are spread? [More]
Northwestern Medicine investigators to lead clinical trial for people with rare cancers

Northwestern Medicine investigators to lead clinical trial for people with rare cancers

A novel national trial for people with no established alternative to treat their rare cancers is being co-led by Northwestern Medicine investigators, who helped conceive of and develop the project. [More]
Small intestine tumors linked to improved survival in adolescents and young adults

Small intestine tumors linked to improved survival in adolescents and young adults

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are tumors that arise is the wall of the digestive tract, and most often occur in the stomach or small intestine. Though more common in later in life, GISTs can occur in adolescents and young adults under 40 years old as well. [More]
Scientists identify 'molecular barcode' in blood samples that can predict survival of Ebola patients

Scientists identify 'molecular barcode' in blood samples that can predict survival of Ebola patients

Scientists have identified a 'molecular barcode' in the blood of patients with Ebola virus disease that can predict whether they are likely to survive or die from the viral infection. [More]
Overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients receiving treatment better than untreated patients

Overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients receiving treatment better than untreated patients

Non-small cell lung cancer patients with advanced disease receiving standard of care treatment have a higher overall survival than similar patients not receiving treatment. [More]
ICLIO white paper spotlights top-level concerns in delivering immunotherapies for cancer

ICLIO white paper spotlights top-level concerns in delivering immunotherapies for cancer

While momentum around immunotherapies for cancer continues to build, the high cost of these therapies places them at the center of debate about how best to define and measure value in cancer care. [More]
Researchers uncover structure of cancer cell receptor protein that paves way for drug development

Researchers uncover structure of cancer cell receptor protein that paves way for drug development

A team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has helped uncover the elusive structure of a cancer cell receptor protein that can be leveraged to fight disease progression. [More]
‘Collateral lethality’ may create new therapeutic options for several cancers

‘Collateral lethality’ may create new therapeutic options for several cancers

Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. These deletions also may extend to neighboring genes, an event known as "collateral lethality," which may create new options for development of therapies for several cancers. [More]
ACA increases accessibility of recommended cancer screening for millions, research finds

ACA increases accessibility of recommended cancer screening for millions, research finds

The Affordable Care Act helped make recommended cancer screening more affordable and accessible for millions of Americans, according to new University of Virginia research. [More]
Researcher awarded $1.8 million grant to explore how chronic stress impacts cancer development

Researcher awarded $1.8 million grant to explore how chronic stress impacts cancer development

A five-year, $1.8 million grant (R01CA203965) from the National Cancer Institute awarded to Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey resident research member Wenwei Hu, PhD, will support research to further elucidate the mechanisms behind the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors - p53. [More]
Research finding provides new target for regulating cell division

Research finding provides new target for regulating cell division

Modern genome sequencing methods used to measure the efficiency of synthesis of individual protein during cell division has found that the enzymes that make lipids and membranes were synthesized at much greater efficiency when a cell is ready to split. [More]
Exercise helps mitigate side effects of AIs in breast cancer survivors

Exercise helps mitigate side effects of AIs in breast cancer survivors

A researcher at Syracuse University has simple advice for breast cancer survivors struggling with the side effects of Aromatase Inhibitors (AIs): exercise. [More]
Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Neurodevelopmental disorders like autism very likely have their origin at the dawn of life, with the emergence of inappropriate connectivity between nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

Researchers uncover how stress hormone prevents digestive enzymes from damaging pancreas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas. [More]
Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Karolinska Institutet have found that gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression (PPD) in first-time mothers. [More]
Stem cell research offers alternative view of cancer metastasis

Stem cell research offers alternative view of cancer metastasis

Stem cells are among the most energetically activated, migratory and proliferative sub-populations of tumour cells, according to observations by scholars at the Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Salford. [More]
Biosimilars create chances to improve sustainability and affordability of cancer treatment

Biosimilars create chances to improve sustainability and affordability of cancer treatment

Biosimilars create opportunities for sustainable cancer care, says the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) in a position paper published in ESMO Open. [More]
Colorado medical students express support for legal use of marijuana

Colorado medical students express support for legal use of marijuana

In the first study of its kind, University of Colorado School of Medicine students expressed support for the legal use of marijuana, including for physical and mental health reasons. [More]
Research shows role played by PAMPs in immune system signaling and response

Research shows role played by PAMPs in immune system signaling and response

How big you are may be as important as what you look like, at least to immune system cells watching for dangerous bacteria and viruses. [More]
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