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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Testing lesions in food pipe could provide early and accurate diagnosis of oesophageal cancer

Testing lesions in food pipe could provide early and accurate diagnosis of oesophageal cancer

Genetically analysing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for oesophageal cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London, Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and Arizona State University. [More]
Nobel laureate-led study uses new technology to watch interaction between telomerase and telomeres

Nobel laureate-led study uses new technology to watch interaction between telomerase and telomeres

As the rope of a chromosomes replicates, it frays at the ends. No problem: A chromosome's ends have extra twine so that fraying doesn't reach into the body of the rope where the important information resides. [More]
Added benefit of lung cancer drug not proven, says IQWiG

Added benefit of lung cancer drug not proven, says IQWiG

Afatinib (trade name: Giotrif) has been approved since April 2016 for the treatment of adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of squamous histology who have already received chemotherapy. [More]
Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

According to a new report by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, mammography may present an opportunity for the expanded use of bundled payments in radiology. [More]
Study highlights racial/ethnic disparities in genomic sequencing

Study highlights racial/ethnic disparities in genomic sequencing

As scientists learn more about which genetic mutations are driving different types of cancer, they're targeting treatments to small numbers of patients with the potential for big payoffs in improved outcomes. [More]
Added benefit not proven for orphan drug in treatment of adults with stomach cancer

Added benefit not proven for orphan drug in treatment of adults with stomach cancer

Ramucirumab (trade name: Cyramza) is a monoclonal antibody, which blocks a receptor, reducing the growth of blood vessels and so reducing blood supply to the tumours. [More]
Many parents support HPV vaccine school-entry requirements with opt-out provisions

Many parents support HPV vaccine school-entry requirements with opt-out provisions

Requiring students to get vaccinated against the human papillomavirus, or HPV, to enter school could prevent many cancers linked to the virus, but University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that many parents only support such requirements with opt-out provisions that could make the laws less effective. [More]
New study reports long-lasting cognitive impairments in mice after chemotherapy treatment

New study reports long-lasting cognitive impairments in mice after chemotherapy treatment

Women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer have long complained of lingering cognitive impairments after treatment. [More]
Fruit fly models may help scientists understand underlying mechanism of HPV-induced cancer

Fruit fly models may help scientists understand underlying mechanism of HPV-induced cancer

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the United States and has been identified as a primary cause of cervical cancer in women. [More]
TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

An international team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found strong evidence supporting a new strategy against drug addiction. [More]
Colorectal tumors present epigenetic heterogeneity, study finds

Colorectal tumors present epigenetic heterogeneity, study finds

A new study led by Dr. Manel Esteller, Director of the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, ICREA researcher and Professor of Genetics at University of Barcelona discovers that colorectal tumors present epigenetic heterogeneity that relates to the clinical course of the disease. [More]
Penn researchers uncover strategy to reverse effects of dyskeratosis congenita

Penn researchers uncover strategy to reverse effects of dyskeratosis congenita

Dyskeratosis congenita, or DC, is a rare, inherited disease for which there are limited treatment options and no cure. [More]
Moffitt research underscores importance of continued lung cancer screening in high-risk patients

Moffitt research underscores importance of continued lung cancer screening in high-risk patients

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for men and women. It is also one of the most complex cancers, both at the molecular level and through its clinical behavior. [More]
New non-invasive MRI-based method can measure dermal fat

New non-invasive MRI-based method can measure dermal fat

Mammals contain two main varieties of fat: white adipose tissue (WAT), which is used to store energy, and brown adipose tissue (BAT), which is involved in the regulation of body temperature, particularly in infants. [More]
Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Scientists at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute found that a deep-water marine sponge collected off of Fort Lauderdale's coast contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells as well as block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound. [More]
New research reveals vanity could play crucial role in protecting young women from harmful UV light

New research reveals vanity could play crucial role in protecting young women from harmful UV light

New research published in Cogent Psychology, examines the way sun safe messages are conveyed to young women, and reveals their vanity could play a vital role in protecting them from harmful UV light. [More]
New NIST Standard Reference Material helps ensure accurate measurements of HER2 breast cancer gene

New NIST Standard Reference Material helps ensure accurate measurements of HER2 breast cancer gene

A new measurement standard developed by the National Institute of Standards of Technology has been used successfully by the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research to check the performance of next-generation DNA-sequencing technologies for evaluating gene variations associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. [More]
Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss

Researchers discover gene linked to age-related hearing loss

A large screening programme has identified several genes associated with age-related conditions including hearing loss, retinal degeneration and osteoarthritis. [More]
Scientists find way to boost efficiency with which CRISPR-Cas9 cuts and disables genes

Scientists find way to boost efficiency with which CRISPR-Cas9 cuts and disables genes

CRISPR-Cas9 is the go-to technique for knocking out genes in human cell lines to discover what the genes do, but the efficiency with which it disables genes can vary immensely. [More]
New clinical trial to examine safety of checkpoint inhibitor in pediatric cancer patients

New clinical trial to examine safety of checkpoint inhibitor in pediatric cancer patients

In an innovative, first-in-pediatrics study, available only at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, researchers will be enrolling children between 1 and 18 years of age who have certain types of relapsed or treatment-resistant cancer. [More]
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