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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Agena Bioscience releases LungFUSION Panel to identify gene fusions in NSCLC tumors

Agena Bioscience releases LungFUSION Panel to identify gene fusions in NSCLC tumors

Agena Bioscience today released the LungFUSION Panel for rapid and sensitive identification of oncogenic ALK, RET, and ROS1 gene fusions in non-small cell lung cancer tumors. [More]
Lycera achieves milestone in Merck research collaboration

Lycera achieves milestone in Merck research collaboration

Lycera Corp., a biopharmaceutical company developing breakthrough medicines to treat cancer and autoimmune disease, today announced the achievement of a milestone under the Company's collaboration agreement with Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, triggering an undisclosed payment. [More]
National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

The National Science Foundation announced that New York University Assistant Professor Riccardo Lattanzi is a recipient of the Faculty Early Career Development Award, more widely known as a CAREER Award. [More]
CASI initiates ENMD-2076 Phase 2 trial in Chinese patients with triple-negative breast cancer

CASI initiates ENMD-2076 Phase 2 trial in Chinese patients with triple-negative breast cancer

CASI Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company dedicated to the acquisition, development and commercialization of innovative therapeutics addressing cancer and other unmet medical needs for the global market with a commercial focus on China, announces that it has initiated a Phase 2 trial of its target therapy drug candidate ENMD-2076 in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in Beijing, China. [More]
Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

Personalized gene therapy to fight against cancer

The fight to treat cancer and eradicate tumors will likely benefit from a new set of treatments if early development phases continue to show promise, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher stated that gene therapies that are able to deliver genetic material to a specific cell population or tumor that will result in the destruction of the tumor. [More]
Scientists establish scientific basis for scalp cooling that can ensure hair retention after cancer treatment

Scientists establish scientific basis for scalp cooling that can ensure hair retention after cancer treatment

HAIR loss is one of the most distressing side-effects of cancer treatment and can even deter some patients from undergoing life-saving chemotherapy. But researchers at the University of Huddersfield are establishing the scientific basis for a rapidly-advancing scalp cooling technology that can ensure hair retention in a vast number of cases. [More]
Study: Blood test can help identify bowel cancer patients who may benefit from chemotherapy

Study: Blood test can help identify bowel cancer patients who may benefit from chemotherapy

Manchester researchers have provided early evidence to suggest that a blood test could be used to identify bowel cancer patients that may benefit from more intensive chemotherapy. [More]
New AGA guideline changes clinical practice for patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts

New AGA guideline changes clinical practice for patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts

A new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association changes clinical practice by recommending longer surveillance periods for patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts and new criteria that limits surgery to those who will receive the most benefit. [More]
New study reveals how cells sort out loops meant to encode microRNAs

New study reveals how cells sort out loops meant to encode microRNAs

Just as two DNA strands naturally arrange themselves into a helix, DNA's molecular cousin RNA can form hairpin-like loops. But unlike DNA, which has a single job, RNA can play many parts -- including acting as a precursor for small molecules that block the activity of genes. These small RNA molecules must be trimmed from long hairpin-loop structures, raising a question: How do cells know which RNA loops need to be processed this way and which don't? [More]
Oncolytics' REOLYSIN granted EMA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of gynecological cancers

Oncolytics' REOLYSIN granted EMA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of gynecological cancers

Oncolytics Biotech Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on the development of oncolytic viruses as potential cancer therapeutics, today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted Orphan Drug Designation for its lead product candidate, REOLYSIN, for the treatment of ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancers. [More]
Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation safer than abdominal procedure for treating presumed fibroid uterus

Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation safer than abdominal procedure for treating presumed fibroid uterus

In a new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, researchers from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill compared the relative risks of laparoscopic hysterectomy (with morcellation) with abdominal surgery for hysterectomy in premenopausal women undergoing surgery for presumed uterine fibroids. [More]
Immunomagnetic assay with microfluidic technology can capture, manipulate circulating tumor cells

Immunomagnetic assay with microfluidic technology can capture, manipulate circulating tumor cells

To quantify rare tumor markers that will allow oncologists to make prognoses and select therapies, John X.J. Zhang, PhD led a team of bioengineers from the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth in demonstrating a novel system that couples nano-engineered particles and microfluidic chips for capturing and manipulating circulating tumor cells (CTCs). [More]
Study explores outcomes of thyroid surgery in professional singers

Study explores outcomes of thyroid surgery in professional singers

A diagnosis of thyroid cancer can be devastating to professional singers, because surgical removal of the thyroid commonly causes voice changes. Massachusetts Eye and Ear surgeons developed a neural monitoring system to be used intraoperatively to improve outcomes. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduced opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia caused by daily morphine injections in rats, according to new research. [More]
CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus, and has potential for development as a disseminating vaccine strategy to prevent ebolavirus infection of wild African ape populations. [More]
DNA samples collected from tampons may help detect endometrial cancer

DNA samples collected from tampons may help detect endometrial cancer

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical "off" switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check. [More]
Study confirms strong association between diabetes and later stage breast cancer

Study confirms strong association between diabetes and later stage breast cancer

Diabetes is associated with more advanced stage breast cancer, according to a new study by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and Women's College Hospital. [More]
Experimental drug that attacks brain tumor cells passes early tests

Experimental drug that attacks brain tumor cells passes early tests

An experimental drug that attacks brain tumor tissue by crippling the cells' energy source called the mitochondria has passed early tests in animal models and human tissue cultures, say Houston Methodist scientists. [More]
2015 Minds Matter event raises funds to support brain tumor research

2015 Minds Matter event raises funds to support brain tumor research

One day in 2009, Maria Nijim's father got behind the wheel of his car and realized he couldn't see out of one eye. An MRI showed a tumor and then surgery confirmed a devastating diagnosis – glioblastoma – the most aggressive type of brain tumor. [More]
Duke researchers develop new model to study why some HPV infections go away and others progress

Duke researchers develop new model to study why some HPV infections go away and others progress

For people infected with the human papilloma virus (HPV), the likelihood of clearing the infection and avoiding HPV-related cancer may depend less on the body's disease-fighting arsenal than has been generally assumed. [More]
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