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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible for smuggling the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens into the cell. [More]

Professor from INRS receives NIH grant to explore biomedical potential in field of oncology

Professor Nicolas Doucet of the Centre INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier has just received a research grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the amount of nearly US$600,000. The 5-year grant is to pursue cutting-edge research in the workings of tiny proteins called RNases and to explore their biomedical potential in the field of oncology as well as in inflammation and asthma. [More]
Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI. The study, by American Cancer Society researchers, fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. The current study appears in the April 2014 issue of Cancer Causes, and Control. [More]

Baxter reports topline results from BAX 111 Phase 3 trial for treatment of von Willebrand disease

Baxter International Inc. today announced topline results from a Phase 3 clinical trial evaluating the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK) of BAX 111. BAX 111 is a recombinant von Willebrand factor (rVWF) under investigation for the treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with von Willebrand disease, the most common type of inherited bleeding disorder. [More]

NICE recommends FIRMAGON for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer in adults with spinal metastases

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) today issued its Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) recommending FIRMAGON (degarelix) as an option for treating advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer, only in adults with spinal metastases who present with signs or symptoms of spinal cord compression. [More]

Cardiologists, cancer experts join forces to establish Cardio-Oncology Clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital

Cardiologists and cancer experts at The Mount Sinai Hospital have joined forces to establish its first Cardio-Oncology Clinic at The Tisch Cancer Institute at The Mount Sinai Hospital. [More]

New fiber-optic device helps clinicians diagnose cancer at early-stage

An engineering researcher at the University of Arkansas has developed an inexpensive, endoscopic microscope capable of producing high-resolution, sub-cellular images of tissue in real time. [More]
MD Anderson honors America's future cancer leaders

MD Anderson honors America's future cancer leaders

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center this week honored 16 junior faculty members who are expected to become some of America's future cancer leaders. The faculty members are the first R. Lee Clark Fellow award winners. The new award was established to recognize outstanding work by junior faculty members and to help support their future efforts. [More]

Harvard successfully transplants regenerated esophagus into rat using bioreactor

Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company developing regenerated organs for transplant, initially focused on the trachea, announces that a research team led by Paolo Macchiarini, MD, PhD at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has successfully transplanted a regenerated esophagus into a rat using a bioreactor developed by HART. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism that explains reason for persistence of hepatitis C virus

Researchers identify mechanism that explains reason for persistence of hepatitis C virus

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]
WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity-the most "feminine" girls and the most "masculine" boys-are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. [More]

U.S. health care spending, usage rise

Americans' spending on medicines in 2013 rose 3.2 percent to nearly $330 billion, fueling speculation that a dip in overall health care spending may be over. [More]
Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

Measurement of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk

With growing evidence that a measurement of the buildup of calcium in coronary arteries can predict heart disease risk, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) researchers found that the process of "calcium scoring" was also accurate in predicting the chances of dying of heart disease among adults with little or no known risk of heart disease. [More]

Top high school students build world's largest wiki on melanoma research

In a groundbreaking effort, 3,500 of the country's top high school students will build the world's largest wiki on melanoma research — and work toward finding that needle in a haystack to cure melanoma. [More]

Bioniche Life Sciences sells Animal Health business to Vétoquinol

Vétoquinol and Bioniche Life Sciences Inc., today jointly announced the closing of the sale of Bioniche's Animal Health business to Vétoquinol. [More]
Protein expression predicts postop NSCLC recurrence, survival

Protein expression predicts postop NSCLC recurrence, survival

US-based researchers have identified a panel of 12 proteins that may help predict overall survival and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer. [More]
New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. [More]
EventusDx completes $2.72M financing to support development, commercialization of Octava breast cancer tests

EventusDx completes $2.72M financing to support development, commercialization of Octava breast cancer tests

Eventus Diagnostics, Inc. today announced completion of a $2.72 million financing. The financing was led by a new family office private investor, and existing investors also participated. Proceeds of the financing will mostly be used to support the continued development and commercialization of the company's Octava breast cancer tests. [More]