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Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

FAU study shows benefits of regular mammography among elder women

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women after skin cancer and occurred in 230,000 women in the United States in 2015. Breast cancer afflicts 1 in 8 women in their lifetime and 1 in 25 die from this disease. [More]
Exercise training could be a new treatment for prostate cancer

Exercise training could be a new treatment for prostate cancer

A newly-launched Cancer Research UK study could be the first step towards exercise training being introduced as a new NHS treatment for prostate cancer. [More]
International panel of clinical experts comment on state of their fields

International panel of clinical experts comment on state of their fields

In an Editorial published this week in PLOS Medicine, editors ask an international panel of eleven expert researchers and clinicians spanning a range of specialties to answer questions on their field and what developments they hope and expect to see in 2016. [More]
Computer model analyses social networks to identify new ways to treat cancer

Computer model analyses social networks to identify new ways to treat cancer

CANCER RESEARCH UK-funded scientists have designed a computer model that applies techniques used to analyse social networks to identify new ways of treating cancer, according to research published in PLOS Computational Biology. [More]
New biopsy system shows promise for early detection of colorectal cancer

New biopsy system shows promise for early detection of colorectal cancer

A university spin-off, AWSensors, is coordinating the European project LIQBIOPSENS to develop liquid biopsy technologies for the early detection of colorectal cancer. [More]
Many patients continue working after metastatic cancer diagnosis, study finds

Many patients continue working after metastatic cancer diagnosis, study finds

A new analysis indicates that many patients continue working after being diagnosed with metastatic cancer, but a heavy burden of symptoms may prevent them from doing so. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study illustrates the need to treat difficult symptoms so that patients can maintain their employment. [More]
Family members of CUP patients at higher risk of developing CUP themselves

Family members of CUP patients at higher risk of developing CUP themselves

Cancer usually begins in one location and then spreads, but in 3 percent to 5 percent of cancer patients, the tissue where a cancer begins is unknown. In these individuals a cancer diagnosis is made because it has metastasized to other sites. Patients with these so-called "cancers of unknown primary," or CUP, have a very poor prognosis, with a median survival of three months. [More]
Study explores link between obesity and breast-cancer related lymphedema

Study explores link between obesity and breast-cancer related lymphedema

Each year, about 1.38 million women worldwide are diagnosed with breast cancer. Advances in treatment have facilitated a 90% five-year survival rate among those treated. Given the increased rate and length of survival following breast cancer, more and more survivors are facing life-time risk of developing late effects of cancer treatment that negatively impact long-term survival. In particular, Breast cancer-related lymphedema is one of the most distressing and feared late effects. [More]
Androgen deprivation therapy elevates Alzheimer’s risk

Androgen deprivation therapy elevates Alzheimer’s risk

US researchers find that androgen deprivation therapy increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in men with prostate cancer, with the risk rising with greater duration of therapy. [More]
Advanced thyroid cancer rates above national average in several parts of California

Advanced thyroid cancer rates above national average in several parts of California

A team of UCLA researchers found that there are several parts of California where, in a high percentage of people with thyroid cancer, the disease is already at an advanced stage by the time it is diagnosed. [More]
Single dose of psilocybin decreases anxiety, depression in cancer patients

Single dose of psilocybin decreases anxiety, depression in cancer patients

A single dose of psilocybin, the major hallucinogenic component in magic mushrooms, induces long-lasting decreases in anxiety and depression in patients diagnosed with life-threatening cancer according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. [More]
Repeating abnormal PSA tests can reduce unnecessary biopsies

Repeating abnormal PSA tests can reduce unnecessary biopsies

For more than 20 years, the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test has been used to help screen for prostate cancer, but in recent years, some task forces have called for this blood test to be abandoned because it leads to many unnecessary biopsies. [More]
Ground breaking technology could revolutionise cancer diagnosis

Ground breaking technology could revolutionise cancer diagnosis

A University of Warwick computer scientist is working with technology that could revolutionise how some cancers are diagnosed. [More]
Aspirin does not improve survival among breast cancer patients with aggressive disease

Aspirin does not improve survival among breast cancer patients with aggressive disease

Whether aspirin may help prevent or reduce the risk of breast cancer remains a hotly debated research question. While past studies have indicated a potential benefit, most recently in hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, one new study from Penn Medicine suggests otherwise. [More]
Researchers partner to help personalize cancer care

Researchers partner to help personalize cancer care

Researchers at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry are partnering with a private company to develop computer simulations that can help personalize cancer care by predicting how a patient will respond to a drug treatment. [More]
Takeda receives FDA approval for NINLARO (ixazomib) capsules to treat patients with multiple myeloma

Takeda receives FDA approval for NINLARO (ixazomib) capsules to treat patients with multiple myeloma

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved NINLARO (ixazomib) capsules, the first and only oral proteasome inhibitor, indicated in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. NINLARO is a once-weekly pill. [More]
Uninsured, low-income breast cancer patients less likely to continue hormonal therapy

Uninsured, low-income breast cancer patients less likely to continue hormonal therapy

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment shows that breast cancer patients whose health insurance plans included prescription drug benefits were 10 percent more likely to start important hormonal therapy than patients who did not have prescription drug coverage. [More]
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