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Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older women

Pap tests may be beneficial for preventing cervical cancer in older women

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. However, most American health guidelines discourage women in that age range from receiving screenings unless they have pre-existing risk factors. [More]
Adjuvant chemotherapy may improve survival in stage 2 colon cancer patients

Adjuvant chemotherapy may improve survival in stage 2 colon cancer patients

Researchers and physicians have grappled with the role of "adjuvant," or post-surgery, chemotherapy for patients with early-stage colon cancer, even for cancers considered high risk. [More]
New streamlined approach to genetic testing benefits women with ovarian cancer

New streamlined approach to genetic testing benefits women with ovarian cancer

A new streamlined approach to genetic testing for women with ovarian cancer provides testing rapidly and affordably, allowing many more patients to benefit from personalised cancer management and their relatives to benefit from cancer prevention strategies. [More]
Pancreatic cysts increase overall risk of pancreatic cancer, study shows

Pancreatic cysts increase overall risk of pancreatic cancer, study shows

A look back at more than half a million patient records has established that patients with pancreatic cysts have a significantly higher overall risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those without such cysts, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]
Routine Pap smear screenings linked to lower cervical cancer risk in older women

Routine Pap smear screenings linked to lower cervical cancer risk in older women

A new study from the University of Illinois confirms a link between routine Pap smear screenings and a lower risk of developing cervical cancer in women over age 65. [More]
Women trust their own judgment when making breast cancer surgery-related decisions

Women trust their own judgment when making breast cancer surgery-related decisions

A research team led by Breast Health Fellow Rebecca M. Kwait, MD, at The Breast Health Center at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, recently presented research indicating that when faced with a decision on the type of surgery to have to remove breast cancer, more women trust their own judgment over the input of their surgeon and even their partner. [More]
Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and University of Melbourne report they have used a genetic test that spots bits of cancer-related DNA circulating in the blood to accurately predict the likelihood of the disease's return in some — but not all — of a small group of patients with early-stage colon cancer. [More]
Proscia completes $1M seed round of financing to advance cancer diagnosis, treatment

Proscia completes $1M seed round of financing to advance cancer diagnosis, treatment

Proscia Inc., a data solutions provider for digital pathology, announced today the completion of its $1M seed round of financing. [More]
Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

In a sample study, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found an association between the makeup of an individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer, a finding that potentially advances the quest for faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Scientists find new way to slow growth of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists find new way to slow growth of triple negative breast cancer

CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have found a new way to slow the growth of the most aggressive type of breast cancer, according to research published in the journal Oncogene today (Monday). [More]
New endoscopic scanner may help in early detection of cancer

New endoscopic scanner may help in early detection of cancer

UPM researchers are involved in a European network to develop an endoscopic scanner for early detection of certain types of cancers that have a high mortality rate today. [More]
UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

The world-renowned iSR'obotTM Mona Lisa makes its way to the United States, providing urologic surgeons with a tool to diagnose prostate cancer earlier through accurate diagnosis and precise localization that may allow for targeted treatments in the future. [More]
Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, is increasing in incidence in the United States, and infection with the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes about 50 percent of cases. [More]
New technique helps identify link between fatty acids and breast cancer in postmenopausal women

New technique helps identify link between fatty acids and breast cancer in postmenopausal women

The presence of high saturated fatty acids in breast tissue may be a useful indicator of cancer in postmenopausal women, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center, published online June 7 in Radiology, a journal of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Giving chemotherapy after radiotherapy delays rare brain tumour growth

Giving chemotherapy after radiotherapy delays rare brain tumour growth

GIVING chemotherapy after radiotherapy delays further growth of a rare type of brain tumour, increasing the number of patients alive at five years from 44 per cent to 56 per cent. [More]
Combination therapy equally good at treating small cell lung cancer

Combination therapy equally good at treating small cell lung cancer

HAVING radiotherapy once a day for six and a half weeks or twice a day for three weeks -- when combined with chemotherapy -- is equally good at treating small cell lung cancer that hasn't spread. [More]
Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black cancer patients between ages 15 and 29 may be more likely than same-aged white patients to die of their disease, according to a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
Researchers explore communication needs, preferences of older Latinos with advanced cancer

Researchers explore communication needs, preferences of older Latinos with advanced cancer

The way in which bad news is communicated to patients at the end of their lives influences their quality of care. Researchers at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work are examining the perceptions and preferences of older Latinos with advanced cancer--one of the fastest growing segments in the aging population--about receiving news on their diagnosis or prognosis. [More]
Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Study identifies potential new treatment for subset of gastric cancer patients

Testing cancers for 'addiction' to a gene that boosts cell growth can pick out patients who may respond to a targeted drug under development, a major new study reports. [More]
AF linked to increased cancer risk in women

AF linked to increased cancer risk in women

Women with new-onset atrial fibrillation have a significantly increased cancer risk for at least 1 year after AF diagnosis, an analysis of Women's Health Study data shows. [More]
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