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Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
Researchers develop evidence-based model that can predict amount of nicotine released from e-cigarette

Researchers develop evidence-based model that can predict amount of nicotine released from e-cigarette

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers at the VCU Center for the Study of Tobacco Products (CSTP) have developed the first ever, evidence-based model that can predict with up to 90 percent accuracy the amount of nicotine emitted by an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette). [More]
Patients with HPV traces post-treatment more likely to have oropharyngeal cancer recurrence

Patients with HPV traces post-treatment more likely to have oropharyngeal cancer recurrence

Oropharyngeal cancer patients who were found to have detectable traces of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) in their saliva following cancer treatment are at an increased risk for recurrence, a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found. [More]
Smaller doses of resveratrol more effective at preventing bowel cancer

Smaller doses of resveratrol more effective at preventing bowel cancer

Resveratrol, a chemical found in red grapes, is more effective in smaller doses at preventing bowel cancer in mice than high doses, according to new research published today (Wednesday) in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Experts draft prescription for making cancer drugs more affordable

Experts draft prescription for making cancer drugs more affordable

A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
MD Anderson researchers find high prevalence of hereditary CRC among people diagnosed before the age of 35

MD Anderson researchers find high prevalence of hereditary CRC among people diagnosed before the age of 35

Hereditary colorectal cancers, caused by inherited gene mutations, are relatively rare for most patients. However, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered a particularly high prevalence of hereditary cancers among those diagnosed with the disease before the age of 35. They suggest that these patients should undergo genetic counseling to determine if their families may be at an elevated risk. [More]
Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism (energy production in cells) to a common and often fatal type of lymphoma. [More]
UT Southwestern's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center receives NCI's comprehensive designation

UT Southwestern's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center receives NCI's comprehensive designation

The National Cancer Institute has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center its highest designation, making it one of only 45 cancer centers nationally to receive this distinction over the past 44 years. [More]
Computer model shows how cancerous tumors manipulate blood-vessel growth for their own benefit

Computer model shows how cancerous tumors manipulate blood-vessel growth for their own benefit

Rice University researchers have built a simulation to show how cancerous tumors manipulate blood-vessel growth for their own benefit. [More]
UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists recently led a panel of experts in revising national guidelines for thyroid cancer testing to reflect newly available tests that better incorporate personalized medicine into diagnosing the condition. [More]
Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

A new analysis of dietary patterns among more than 100,000 Americans suggests that frequent consumption of citrus -- namely whole grapefruit and orange juice -- may be associated with an increased risk of melanoma. [More]
Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

America's oldest cancer center and one of the world's newest oncology centers are partnering to improve access to cancer prevention, screening and care for the people of Nigeria. Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Lakeshore Cancer Center have announced an affiliation that will see Roswell Park faculty providing clinical consultations to assist LCC oncologists, who will also have access to both training at RPCI and continuing professional education seminars they can participate in remotely. [More]
Study suggests link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of HPV vaccine series among Appalachian women

Study suggests link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of HPV vaccine series among Appalachian women

Could a fatalistic attitude toward cervical cancer serve as a barrier to prevention of the disease? A recent study conducted by University of Kentucky researchers in the Rural Cancer Prevention Center suggests a link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series among a sample of young Appalachian Kentucky women. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
Gene-encoded protein may be effective in early detection of pancreatic cancer

Gene-encoded protein may be effective in early detection of pancreatic cancer

A protein encoded by the gene glypican-1 (GPC1) present on cancer exosomes may be used as part of a potential non-invasive diagnostic and screening tool to detect early pancreatic cancer, potentially at a stage amenable to surgical treatment, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early age at menarche, or first menstrual cycle, could play a role in the disproportionate incidence of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers diagnosed among African-American women, according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. [More]
DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

Although traditionally understood to induce death in cancer cells, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that the DAPK1 protein is actually essential for growth in breast and other cancers with mutations in the TP53 gene. This discovery indicates DAPK1 may be a promising new therapeutic target for many of the most aggressive cancers. [More]
Researchers show how a new drug speeds tissue regeneration in animal models

Researchers show how a new drug speeds tissue regeneration in animal models

The concept sounds like the stuff of science fiction: take a pill, and suddenly new tissues grow to replace damaged ones. Researchers at Case Western Reserve and UT Southwestern Medical Center this week announced that they have taken significant steps toward turning this once-improbable idea into a vivid reality. [More]
Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Mutations in ARID1a, which are common in many cancer types, disrupt DNA damage repair in cancer cells, allowing the cancer to progress. This gene may also be an Achilles' heel when treating certain tumors, according to a team of researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
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