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Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco sales within 1,000 feet of schools could reduce socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco density across neighborhoods, according to a study being published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. [More]
New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered new genetic markers associated with a fast rate of nicotine metabolism, which potentially leads smokers to smoke more, thereby, increasing their risk for lung cancer. [More]
Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

A large, nationwide study published in the journal JAMA Oncology found that people who received transplants of cells collected from a donor's bone marrow the original source for blood stem cell transplants, developed decades ago had better self-reported psychological well-being, experienced fewer symptoms of a common post-transplant side effect called graft-vs.-host disease and were more likely to be back at work five years after transplantation than those whose transplanted cells were taken from the donor's bloodstream. [More]
Newfound role for PARP proteins could lead to therapeutic opportunities for cancer

Newfound role for PARP proteins could lead to therapeutic opportunities for cancer

Using technology they developed, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a previously unknown role of a certain class of proteins: as regulators of gene activity and RNA processing. [More]
New study uncovers how chromosomal changes impact tumor formation and growth

New study uncovers how chromosomal changes impact tumor formation and growth

As with most cancers, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells have abnormal amounts of chromosomes or DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) in their genomes. [More]
Analysis of biopsies during early treatment predicts patient’s response to melanoma immunotherapy

Analysis of biopsies during early treatment predicts patient’s response to melanoma immunotherapy

Immune response measured in tumor biopsies during the course of early treatment predicts which melanoma patients will benefit from specific immune checkpoint blockade drugs, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cancer Discovery. [More]
Rice University bioengineer receives NIH grant to study use of AAV-based therapy to combat ovarian cancer

Rice University bioengineer receives NIH grant to study use of AAV-based therapy to combat ovarian cancer

Rice University bioengineer Junghae Suh has been awarded a prestigious R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to research the use of viral gene therapy to fight ovarian cancer. [More]
Research finding opens door to potential clinical approaches that may boost body's ability to battle cancer

Research finding opens door to potential clinical approaches that may boost body's ability to battle cancer

The microenvironment that supports a cancerous tumor also starves the immune cells that the body sends in to destroy the cancer, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists revealed in a discovery that holds the potential to significantly boost the performance of breakthrough immunotherapy drugs. [More]
Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene, one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one researchers have so far had difficulty targeting successfully. [More]
Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Not only is breast cancer more than one disease, but a single breast cancer tumor can vary within itself, a finding that University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers discovered has the potential to lead to very different patient treatment plans depending on the tumor sample and diagnostic testing used. [More]
ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

Although it reads like European license plate number, a protein known as ZMYND8 has demonstrated its ability to block metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Study shows patients with skin of color less likely to survive melanoma

Study shows patients with skin of color less likely to survive melanoma

Because Caucasians have a higher skin cancer risk than the general population, people with skin of color may believe that they don't need to be concerned about this disease — but new research reveals this to be a dangerous misconception. [More]
Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer and that, when deleted in the lungs of mice, prevents the cancer from forming. [More]
Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health shows no significant decline in indoor tanning rates among children under age 17 following a ban on such use in New Jersey enacted in 2013. [More]
ASTRO honors Ms. Keresztes with 2016 Survivor Circle Award

ASTRO honors Ms. Keresztes with 2016 Survivor Circle Award

The American Society for Radiation Oncology has chosen Theresa A. Keresztes, a resident of Wellesley, Massachusetts, to receive the 2016 Survivor Circle Award. [More]
Study finds new data about dMMR's hereditary basis in rectal cancer

Study finds new data about dMMR's hereditary basis in rectal cancer

Up to 15 percent of colorectal cancers show a genetic mutation known as DNA mismatch repair deficiency, or dMMR. [More]
Losing weight can lower levels of some proteins linked to tumor growth

Losing weight can lower levels of some proteins linked to tumor growth

Overweight and obese women who lost weight through diet and exercise lowered the levels of certain proteins in their blood that play a role in angiogenesis, the process of blood vessel growth that can promote the growth and survival of cancer cells [More]
Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs

A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure. [More]
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