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Men with chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice risk of prostate cancer

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]

Study: Chronic inflammation associated with aggressive prostate cancer

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]

Researchers recommend early colorectal cancer screening guidelines for cervical cancer survivors

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. [More]
Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI. The study, by American Cancer Society researchers, fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. The current study appears in the April 2014 issue of Cancer Causes, and Control. [More]
Tumor-suppressing protein acts as dimmer switch to dial down gene expression

Tumor-suppressing protein acts as dimmer switch to dial down gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that's tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. [More]
Research shows blocking DNA repair improves radiation therapy for glioblastomas

Research shows blocking DNA repair improves radiation therapy for glioblastomas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have demonstrated in both cancer cell lines and in mice that blocking critical DNA repair mechanisms could improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for highly fatal brain tumors called glioblastomas. [More]
Bezos family gifts $20M to Fred Hutchinson scientists for development of novel cancer immunotherapies

Bezos family gifts $20M to Fred Hutchinson scientists for development of novel cancer immunotherapies

​Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientists striving for new cancer cures - and the patients who stand to benefit from them - got an enormous boost today when the Bezos family committed $20 million to support the development of novel cancer immunotherapies. It is the largest single contribution in Fred Hutch's history. [More]

UPCI/MWRI researchers to present results of immune gene profile exploring endometriosis and cancer

Some women with endometriosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, are predisposed to ovarian cancer, and a genetic screening might someday help reveal which women are most at risk, according to a University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) study, in partnership with Magee-Womens Research Institute (MWRI). [More]
Compounds from plant confer protective effects against breast cancer, say researchers

Compounds from plant confer protective effects against breast cancer, say researchers

Compounds derived from plant-based sources - including garlic, broccoli and medicine plants - confer protective effects against breast cancer, explain researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with the UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

Staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients

The probability of staying disease-free improves dramatically for ovarian cancer patients who already have been disease-free for a period of time, and time elapsed since remission should be taken into account when making follow-up care decisions, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

Head and neck cancers associated with genetic alterations could be sensitive to existing cancer drug

An examination of the genetic landscape of head and neck cancers indicates that while metastatic and primary tumor cells share similar mutations, recurrent disease is associated with gene alterations that could be exquisitely sensitive to an existing cancer drug. [More]
Research suggests NEDD9 scaffolding protein activates oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells, encourages metastases

Research suggests NEDD9 scaffolding protein activates oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells, encourages metastases

Researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center have shown that NEDD9, a scaffolding protein responsible for regulating signaling pathways in the cell, promotes the growth and spread of epithelial ovarian cancer. [More]

Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments in patients with melanoma

Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

Personalized treatment approach may benefit patients with common breast cancer subtype

The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. [More]

Susan G. Komen announces new grants to seven breast cancer organizations

Susan G. Komen today announced more than $1.89 million in new grants to seven breast cancer organizations serving the National Capital Region. The announcement came during the Susan G. Komen Global Race for the Cure Media Kickoff Event and Survivor Roundtable marking the official start of activities leading up to the 25th Global Race for the Cure May 10 on the National Mall. [More]

Discovery could lead to new medications for cancer, say Rice University scientists

A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell's decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics. [More]
Tumor suppressor gene linked to stem cell function

Tumor suppressor gene linked to stem cell function

Just as archeologists try to decipher ancient tablets to discern their meaning, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer biologists are working to decode the purpose of an ancient gene considered one of the most important in cancer research. [More]
Journal addresses impact of obesity on gynecologic cancer patients

Journal addresses impact of obesity on gynecologic cancer patients

Latest special issue of journal Gynecologic Oncology addresses the impact of obesity on gynecologic cancer patients, oncologists and cancer care delivery systems [More]
Researchers uncover new connection between allergy and cancer

Researchers uncover new connection between allergy and cancer

While many are stocking up on allergy medicine in preparation for spring, a new study from researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center has uncovered a new connection between allergy and cancer that could potentially lead to therapies involving common antihistamines. [More]
Rice University technique able to analyze conformations of complex molecular machines

Rice University technique able to analyze conformations of complex molecular machines

Open, feed, cut. Such is the humdrum life of a motor molecule, the subject of new research at Rice University, that eats and excretes damaged proteins and turns them into harmless peptides for disposal. [More]