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Counsyl expands into oncology market to increase cancer risk screening

Counsyl expands into oncology market to increase cancer risk screening

Counsyl, a DNA testing and genetic counseling service, today announced its expansion into the oncology market, with a focus on advancing cancer risk screening and helping cancer prevention efforts. [More]
Free screening colonoscopies for uninsured, high-risk CRC patients may help in early detection of cancer

Free screening colonoscopies for uninsured, high-risk CRC patients may help in early detection of cancer

For uninsured patients who are at a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), performing free screening colonoscopies can identify cancer at an earlier stage and appears to be cost neutral from a hospital system perspective, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons ahead of print publication. [More]
Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Whole-exome sequencing of both colorectal adenomas (precancers often called polyps) and intestinal mucosa at risk for developing into adenomas from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has generated a comprehensive picture of the genomic alterations that characterize the evolution of normal mucosa to precancer. [More]
New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

New Rutgers research aims at exploring gender differences in lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Lung cancer diagnoses have more than doubled among females in the past 38 years, while having fallen 29 percent among males, according to the American Lung Association. [More]
Early epigenetic changes could open way for new preventative strategies for ovarian cancer

Early epigenetic changes could open way for new preventative strategies for ovarian cancer

Research revealing early changes at epigenetic level points to possible new prevention strategies for ovarian cancer. The discovery of early changes in the cells of the Fallopian tubes of women carrying the BRCA genetic mutation could open the way for new preventative strategies for ovarian cancer, reducing the need for invasive surgery, according to research published today in science journal Nature Communications. [More]
Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Rice University researchers set stage for large-scale synthesis of cytotoxic agent to treat cancer

Rice University researchers set stage for large-scale synthesis of cytotoxic agent to treat cancer

The lab of Rice University synthetic organic chemist K.C. Nicolaou has reported the streamlined total synthesis of delta12-prostaglandin J3, a molecule previously claimed to kill leukemic cancer cells. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Innovative research technique may help understand early stage kidney disease

Innovative research technique may help understand early stage kidney disease

UT Dallas scientists are developing an innovative research technique that could help urologists better understand the early stages of kidney disease. [More]
Incorrect use of sunscreens could increase skin cancer risk

Incorrect use of sunscreens could increase skin cancer risk

How well do you understand sunscreen? For many consumers, the answer is not so well. According to new research, many people are still puzzled by the wide range of SPF numbers on product labels, and some may not be using sunscreen properly, which could increase their skin cancer risk. [More]
Carol Fabian inducted into KU Women's Hall of Fame for contributions to breast cancer research

Carol Fabian inducted into KU Women's Hall of Fame for contributions to breast cancer research

Among the women inducted into the University of Kansas Hall of Fame on April 14, 2016, was Carol Fabian, MD. Fabian, a professor of medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center and director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Center at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, is a nationally recognized oncologist and a pioneer in in the field of breast cancer research. [More]
Adolescent fruit intake may reduce breast cancer risk

Adolescent fruit intake may reduce breast cancer risk

Two linked papers in The BMJ this week shed new light on the relation of alcohol and diet with breast cancer and heart disease. [More]
Exercise may significantly lessen cervical cancer risk in women

Exercise may significantly lessen cervical cancer risk in women

Even 30 minutes of exercise per week has the potential to significantly reduce a woman's risk of developing cervical cancer, according to a study from scientists at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). The case-control study was recently published in the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease. [More]
Researchers discover new function of genes in Fanconi anemia pathway

Researchers discover new function of genes in Fanconi anemia pathway

Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified an important new function of genes in the Fanconi anemia pathway - a finding that could have implications for development of new therapies to treat this disorder and some cancers. [More]
Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Skin cancer can affect anyone, regardless of age, race or gender. When it comes to skin cancer prevention and detection, however, it seems that men need to brush up on their knowledge. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Twenty-seven of 29 patients with an advanced type of leukemia that had proved resistant to multiple other forms of therapy went into remission after their T cells (disease-fighting immune cells) were genetically engineered to fight their cancers. [More]
Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted. [More]
Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

People who had cancer before receiving an organ transplant were more likely to die of any cause, die of cancer or develop a new cancer than organ recipients who did not previously have cancer, a new paper has found. However, the increased risk is less than that reported in some previous studies. [More]
Scientists identify critical biological factor for transforming adult somatic cells into stem cells

Scientists identify critical biological factor for transforming adult somatic cells into stem cells

In a new Cell Reports paper, a team led by John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D., of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, has identified and characterized a biological factor critical to the transformation of adult somatic cells (cells that are not sperm or egg cells) into stem cells. [More]
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