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Fox Chase Cancer Center's Radiation Oncology Department earns ACR accreditation

Fox Chase Cancer Center's Radiation Oncology Department earns ACR accreditation

Fox Chase Cancer Center's Radiation Oncology Department, an international leader known for offering the latest advancements in radiation treatment, has earned accreditation from the American College of Radiology for another three years at both its main campus in Northeast Philadelphia and Buckingham facility. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease. However, most cervical cancers are preventable through immunization against the human papillomavirus (HPV). A pivotal international phase 2/3 clinical trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center faculty demonstrated that vaccination with Gardasil 9 protects against nine HPV types, seven of which cause most cases of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease. [More]
MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

Cancer prevention experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have allied with the CATCH Global Foundation, whose comprehensive child health program reaches children and their families in more than 10,000 educational settings nationwide, to promote behavior that will lower children's lifelong risk of developing cancer. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists identify new biomarker that could optimize chemotherapy response

UT Southwestern scientists identify new biomarker that could optimize chemotherapy response

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a new biomarker that could help identify patients who are more likely to respond to certain chemotherapies. [More]
OHSU Knight Cancer Institute funds 17 community projects to decrease impact of cancer on Oregonians

OHSU Knight Cancer Institute funds 17 community projects to decrease impact of cancer on Oregonians

The Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University awarded $462,656 to 17 projects statewide as part of the first round of funding offered through its Community Partnership Program. The program's goal is to address community-identified needs to ultimately decrease the impact of cancer on Oregonians. [More]
Excluding cancer survivors from lung cancer clinical trials may not be justified, study finds

Excluding cancer survivors from lung cancer clinical trials may not be justified, study finds

The common practice of excluding patients with a prior cancer diagnosis from lung cancer clinical trials may not be justified, according to a study by researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Scientists find that collagen 'cross-links' can determine tumor's ability to grow and spread

Scientists find that collagen 'cross-links' can determine tumor's ability to grow and spread

When skyscrapers go up, contractors rely on an infrastructure of steel beams and braces. Some cancers grow the same way, using a biological matrix from which the tumor can thrive and spread. [More]
41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

41% of the British population unaware of the role of diet in cancer development

Surprising new statistics reveal that 41% of the British population are oblivious to the role that diet plays in the development of cancer - and even those with a family history of the disease are failing to consume potentially "cancer-preventing" compounds in their daily diet. [More]
Study shows that text messages could improve skin cancer prevention, promote sun protection

Study shows that text messages could improve skin cancer prevention, promote sun protection

Australians' love affair with mobile phones could save their life according to a joint QUT, Cancer Council Queensland and University of Queensland study using text messages to improve skin cancer prevention and promote sun protection. [More]
Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Preventing cancer requires intimate knowledge of how cancer starts, what causes it to grow and flourish, and how to stop it in its tracks. Sometimes this comes in the form of a vaccine (the HPV vaccine for cervical and head and neck cancers), a screening (a colonoscopy for colorectal cancer) or a blood test (the PSA level test for prostate cancer). [More]
One in four nonsmokers still exposed to secondhand smoke, shows CDC report

One in four nonsmokers still exposed to secondhand smoke, shows CDC report

Although secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in the United States dropped by half between 1999 to 2000 and 2011 to 2012, one in four nonsmokers -- 58 million people -- are still exposed to SHS, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Study: Smoking increases mortality risk among colorectal cancer survivors

Study: Smoking increases mortality risk among colorectal cancer survivors

Colorectal cancer survivors who smoke cigarettes were at more than twice the risk of death than non-smoking survivors, adding to existing evidence that cigarette smoking is associated with higher all-cause and colorectal cancer-specific mortality. [More]
International community funding can significantly reduce cancer deaths in LMICs by 2030

International community funding can significantly reduce cancer deaths in LMICs by 2030

Increased annual international community funding of US$18 billion globally could save three million lives per year by 2030 and many more in succeeding decades, [More]
Researchers reveal new pathway for inhibiting growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA mutations

Researchers reveal new pathway for inhibiting growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA mutations

Inhibiting the action of a particular enzyme dramatically slows the growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations which, in turn, are closely tied to breast and ovarian cancers, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Study clarifies association between metformin use and lung cancer risk

Study clarifies association between metformin use and lung cancer risk

Among nonsmokers who had diabetes, those who took the diabetes drug metformin had a decrease in lung cancer risk, according to a study in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, by Lori Sakoda, PhD, MPH, research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California. [More]
Study discovers microRNA signatures that could predict prognosis, distant metastasis in colorectal cancer

Study discovers microRNA signatures that could predict prognosis, distant metastasis in colorectal cancer

A new study developed at the Center for Gastrointestinal Cancer Research and the Center for Epigenetics, Cancer Prevention and Cancer Genomics at Baylor Research Institute has discovered unique metastasis-specific microRNA signatures in primary colorectal cancers that could predict prognosis and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer. [More]
Researchers reveal why many African-American women are diagnosed with deadly forms of breast cancer

Researchers reveal why many African-American women are diagnosed with deadly forms of breast cancer

Researchers have uncovered new information that may begin to explain why many African-American women are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive, often deadly forms of breast cancer, which strengthens the evidence that increased dietary folate intake may prove to be an effective strategy for reducing risk for the disease in African-American women. [More]
NCCN commemorates 20 years of advancing high-quality, high-value cancer care

NCCN commemorates 20 years of advancing high-quality, high-value cancer care

On January 31, 2015, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network celebrates its 20th anniversary. Originally announced as an alliance of 13 leading cancer centers in 1995, NCCN has grown to a network of 25 academic cancer centers; the NCCN mission as an alliance of leading academic cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. [More]
Pancreatic cancer cells know a way to sidestep chemotherapy, reveal Fox Chase researchers

Pancreatic cancer cells know a way to sidestep chemotherapy, reveal Fox Chase researchers

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of the disease. The American Cancer Society's most recent estimates for 2014 show that over 46,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and more than 39,000 will die from it. Now, research led by Timothy J. Yen, PhD, Professor at Fox Chase Cancer Center, reveals that one reason this deadly form of cancer can be so challenging to treat is because its cells have found a way to sidestep chemotherapy. [More]