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Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
History of oral contraceptive use influences survival in ovarian cancer patients

History of oral contraceptive use influences survival in ovarian cancer patients

A history of oral contraceptive use and having at least one child increased longevity by nearly three years in patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, according to a Roswell Park Cancer Institute study recently published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. [More]
Obesity raises Lynch syndrome CRC risk

Obesity raises Lynch syndrome CRC risk

Obesity increases the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with Lynch syndrome, research indicates, but daily aspirin use may combat this excess risk. [More]
Purple potatoes may help prevent colon cancer

Purple potatoes may help prevent colon cancer

Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers. [More]
Immatics US launched to develop adoptive cellular therapies for treatment of various tumors

Immatics US launched to develop adoptive cellular therapies for treatment of various tumors

Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced today the launch of Immatics US, Inc., a new company aiming at becoming a global leader in adoptive cellular therapies (ACT) for the treatment of a range of tumor types. [More]
UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

UH research points to promising target in treatment of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is extremely deadly and often has a poor prognosis. Ranked as the fourth deadliest cancer in the U.S. and poised to move up within the next few years, pancreatic cancer is very difficult to detect in its early stages. Seldom diagnosed early and typically spreading rapidly, the disease has no effective treatment once it advances. [More]
Moffitt researchers discover high BRCA mutation frequency in young black women with breast cancer

Moffitt researchers discover high BRCA mutation frequency in young black women with breast cancer

Women who have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are more likely to develop breast cancer or ovarian cancer, especially at a younger age. Approximately 5 percent of women with breast cancer in the United States have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 based on estimates in non-Hispanic white women. [More]
Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

The molecular switches regulating human cell growth do a great job of replacing cells that die during the course of a lifetime. But when they misfire, life-threatening cancers can occur. Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has revealed a new electrical mechanism that can control these switches. [More]
Regulation of tumor microenvironment may offer alternate method for cancer treatment

Regulation of tumor microenvironment may offer alternate method for cancer treatment

Scientists know that activation of growth factor receptors like epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) promote tumor progression in many types of cancer. [More]
New system accurately and reliably captures patient experience with cancer drug side effects

New system accurately and reliably captures patient experience with cancer drug side effects

In cancer clinical trials, symptom side effects patients experience, like nausea, are typically reported by doctors, and not directly by patients. Previous research has shown that doctors under-report these symptoms. [More]
National Cancer Institute's PRO-CTCAE accurate and reliable compared to other patient-reported measures

National Cancer Institute's PRO-CTCAE accurate and reliable compared to other patient-reported measures

A multicenter study involving Mayo Clinic researchers has found that the National Cancer Institute's Patient Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE), was accurate, reliable and responsive, compared to other, established patient-reported and clinical measures. The study is published today in the journal JAMA Oncology. [More]
FGF protein may play key role in breast and prostate cancer, shows research

FGF protein may play key role in breast and prostate cancer, shows research

Simply put, cancer is caused by mutations to genes within a cell that lead to abnormal cell growth. Finding out what causes that genetic mutation has been the holy grail of medical science for decades. [More]
Five sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about sun safety

Five sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about sun safety

Five globe-trotting, sun-blocking superheroes teach preschoolers about lifelong sun safety in a new curriculum available this summer based on research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Chances of survival due to chemotherapy significantly lower for older breast cancer patients

Chances of survival due to chemotherapy significantly lower for older breast cancer patients

Chemotherapy prolongs life for older adults with most types of cancer, but for women over the age of 80 with breast cancer, the chances of survival due to chemotherapy are significantly lower, according to a study led by researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Researcher study potential biomarker to determine patients at risk for aggressive breast cancer

Researcher study potential biomarker to determine patients at risk for aggressive breast cancer

Biomarkers are an important part in detecting certain cancers such as the BRCA gene in breast cancer and the PSA antigen in prostate cancer. They are easy to identify in a blood test and can help in diagnosing and giving a prognosis. [More]
Shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy better for women with early stage breast cancer

Shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy better for women with early stage breast cancer

Women who receive a shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy for early stage disease experience less toxicity and improved quality of life compared to those who undergo a longer course of treatment, researchers report from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Report: Florida falling short on policies to prevent, fight cancer

Report: Florida falling short on policies to prevent, fight cancer

Florida is falling short when it comes to supporting policies and passing legislation to prevent and reduce suffering and death from cancer. According to the latest edition of How Do You Measure Up?: A Progress Report on State Legislative Activity to Reduce Cancer Incidence and Mortality, Florida did not measure up to policy recommendations in any of the nine issue areas ranked. [More]
Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Study demonstrates significance of EMT as potential therapeutic target for reversing kidney disease

Adults who are worried or terrified sometimes curl up into a fetal position. Likewise, adult cells that are injured, including genetic injury leading to cancer, initiate a process that was present during embryonic development. [More]
Research: Failure to control early, localized prostate cancer leads to poor clinical outcome

Research: Failure to control early, localized prostate cancer leads to poor clinical outcome

Failure to control early, localized prostate cancer results in a poor clinical outcome, according to research published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. [More]
Soldiers returning from combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan at increased risk of skin cancer

Soldiers returning from combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan at increased risk of skin cancer

Soldiers who served in the glaring desert sunlight of Iraq and Afghanistan returned home with an increased risk of skin cancer, due not only to the desert climate, but also a lack of sun protection, Vanderbilt dermatologist Jennifer Powers, M.D., reports in a study published recently in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
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