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Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

Frequent consumption of citrus fruits may increase risk of skin cancer

A new analysis of dietary patterns among more than 100,000 Americans suggests that frequent consumption of citrus -- namely whole grapefruit and orange juice -- may be associated with an increased risk of melanoma. [More]
Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

America's oldest cancer center and one of the world's newest oncology centers are partnering to improve access to cancer prevention, screening and care for the people of Nigeria. Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Lakeshore Cancer Center have announced an affiliation that will see Roswell Park faculty providing clinical consultations to assist LCC oncologists, who will also have access to both training at RPCI and continuing professional education seminars they can participate in remotely. [More]
Study suggests link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of HPV vaccine series among Appalachian women

Study suggests link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of HPV vaccine series among Appalachian women

Could a fatalistic attitude toward cervical cancer serve as a barrier to prevention of the disease? A recent study conducted by University of Kentucky researchers in the Rural Cancer Prevention Center suggests a link between fatalistic beliefs and completion of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series among a sample of young Appalachian Kentucky women. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
Gene-encoded protein may be effective in early detection of pancreatic cancer

Gene-encoded protein may be effective in early detection of pancreatic cancer

A protein encoded by the gene glypican-1 (GPC1) present on cancer exosomes may be used as part of a potential non-invasive diagnostic and screening tool to detect early pancreatic cancer, potentially at a stage amenable to surgical treatment, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early age at menarche, or first menstrual cycle, could play a role in the disproportionate incidence of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers diagnosed among African-American women, according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. [More]
DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

Although traditionally understood to induce death in cancer cells, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that the DAPK1 protein is actually essential for growth in breast and other cancers with mutations in the TP53 gene. This discovery indicates DAPK1 may be a promising new therapeutic target for many of the most aggressive cancers. [More]
Researchers show how a new drug speeds tissue regeneration in animal models

Researchers show how a new drug speeds tissue regeneration in animal models

The concept sounds like the stuff of science fiction: take a pill, and suddenly new tissues grow to replace damaged ones. Researchers at Case Western Reserve and UT Southwestern Medical Center this week announced that they have taken significant steps toward turning this once-improbable idea into a vivid reality. [More]
Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Mutations in ARID1a, which are common in many cancer types, disrupt DNA damage repair in cancer cells, allowing the cancer to progress. This gene may also be an Achilles' heel when treating certain tumors, according to a team of researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Researchers examine specific causes of mortality after blood and marrow transplant

Researchers examine specific causes of mortality after blood and marrow transplant

Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with leukemia or other life-threating blood diseases. With a goal of increasing survival rates, a research team led by Roswell Park Cancer Institute investigators verified patient outcome data submitted by more than 150 U.S. transplant centers over an 11-year period to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. [More]
Simon Fraser University's Maryam Sadeghi to unveil MoleScope at World Congress of Dermatology

Simon Fraser University's Maryam Sadeghi to unveil MoleScope at World Congress of Dermatology

Simon Fraser University PhD graduate Maryam Sadeghi will unveil MoleScope, an innovative hand-held tool that uses a smartphone to monitor skin for signs of cancer, at the World Congress of Dermatology conference in Vancouver June 9-13. [More]
Massey researchers aim to develop models that can predict complications from stem cell transplantation

Massey researchers aim to develop models that can predict complications from stem cell transplantation

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center's Bone Marrow Transplant Program have recently published findings from a phase 2 clinical trial that demonstrate lymphocyte recovery in related and unrelated stem cell transplant recipients generally falls into three patterns that are significantly associated with survival. [More]
Frisbie Memorial Hospital now uses low-dose CT scanning for screening colorectal cancer

Frisbie Memorial Hospital now uses low-dose CT scanning for screening colorectal cancer

Frisbie Memorial Hospital is now using low-dose CT scanning as a follow-up tool for screening colorectal cancer. This procedure, known as virtual colonoscopy, does not replace the effective and most reliable colorectal cancer screening tool, which is the colonoscopy, but rather it is utilized as a means to obtain additional images of the colon and rectum. [More]
New finding may lead to development of immunity-based therapies for tuberculosis

New finding may lead to development of immunity-based therapies for tuberculosis

A study by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center has identified how an enzyme involved in protecting the body from pathogens senses Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial pathogen that infects millions of people worldwide and causes about 1.5 million deaths annually. [More]
Experimental drug and common antibiotic combination holds promise for pancreatic cancer treatment

Experimental drug and common antibiotic combination holds promise for pancreatic cancer treatment

Despite surgical advances, pancreatic cancer continues to be one of the most deadly and difficult cancers to manage due to a lack of effective therapies. However, VCU Massey Cancer Center and VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM) scientists in the lab of Paul B. Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D., are hoping to change that with a novel combination of an experimental drug and a common antibiotic that has shown promising results in preclinical experiments. [More]
Heart-healthy diet may benefit men after prostate cancer diagnosis

Heart-healthy diet may benefit men after prostate cancer diagnosis

After a prostate cancer diagnosis, eating a diet higher in red and processed meat, high-fat dairy foods, and refined grains--known as a Western diet--may lead to a significantly higher risk of both prostate cancer-related mortality and overall mortality compared with eating a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, and healthy oils, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Green tea components may help prevent prostate cancer development in at-risk men

Green tea components may help prevent prostate cancer development in at-risk men

Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in men and is predicted to result in an estimated 220,00 cases in the United States in 2015. In recent years, an emphasis has been placed on chemoprevention - the use of agents to prevent the development or progression of prostate cancer. [More]
Study: New cases of cancer rising globally, but death rates falling in many countries

Study: New cases of cancer rising globally, but death rates falling in many countries

New cases of virtually all types of cancer are rising in countries globally - regardless of income - but the death rates from cancer are falling in many countries, according to a new analysis of 28 cancer groups in 188 countries. [More]
Modest lifestyle changes help breast cancer survivors lose weight

Modest lifestyle changes help breast cancer survivors lose weight

Carrying extra body fat increases the risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke, and also increases risk of cancer recurrence after a breast cancer diagnosis. A multi-institutional study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 shows that female breast cancer survivors are able to lose weight through modest lifestyle changes. [More]
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