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New NCCN Guidelines outline diagnosis, treatment strategies for myeloproliferative neoplasms

New NCCN Guidelines outline diagnosis, treatment strategies for myeloproliferative neoplasms

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) are a group of blood cancers characterized by significant symptoms and a high risk of transformation into acute leukemia. [More]
Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

Study finds nonwhite transplant recipients at risk for skin cancer

A new study from Drexel University College of Medicine suggests all organ transplant recipients, regardless of race, should receive routine, total-body screenings for skin cancer. [More]
Researchers underscore importance of immune-based prevention to conquer cancer

Researchers underscore importance of immune-based prevention to conquer cancer

In a Perspective piece published this week in PNAS, cancer researchers from across the country, including faculty at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, write that a greater emphasis on immune-based prevention should be central to new efforts like the federal Cancer Moonshot program, headed by Vice President Joe Biden. [More]
Diet high in calcium, low in lactose may decrease risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women

Diet high in calcium, low in lactose may decrease risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and and other U.S. health and academic institutions shows a diet high in calcium and low in lactose may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women. [More]
Moffitt Cancer Center addresses cancer-related needs and concerns of LGBTQ community

Moffitt Cancer Center addresses cancer-related needs and concerns of LGBTQ community

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer /Questioning (LGBTQ) community is growing, with an estimated 3 to 12 percent of Americans identifying as LGBTQ. [More]
Right dose of CAR T cells and lymphodepletion can achieve good response rates for NHL patients

Right dose of CAR T cells and lymphodepletion can achieve good response rates for NHL patients

In a paper published today in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center shared data from an early-phase study of patients with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who received JCAR014, a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell treatment, and chemotherapy. [More]
Study finds cord blood transplant recipients appear to have better outcomes against leukemia

Study finds cord blood transplant recipients appear to have better outcomes against leukemia

Umbilical cord blood transplants may have advantages beyond offering an alternative stem cell source for leukemia patients without a traditional donor match, according to a study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
HIF-2 inhibitors could be promising target to combat kidney cancer

HIF-2 inhibitors could be promising target to combat kidney cancer

A new class of drugs called HIF-2 inhibitors is more effective and better tolerated than the standard of care drug sunitinib in treating kidney cancer, researchers with the Kidney Cancer Program at Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center have found. [More]
Scientists combine immunotherapy with chemotherapy to eliminate cancer recurrence

Scientists combine immunotherapy with chemotherapy to eliminate cancer recurrence

Scientists from the United States have made an important step toward eliminating cancer recurrence by combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. [More]
Study shows children present at home did not motivate parents to test for radon and tobacco smoke

Study shows children present at home did not motivate parents to test for radon and tobacco smoke

A University of Louisville School of Nursing researcher has found that the presence of children in the home did not motivate parents to test and mitigate for radon and secondhand tobacco smoke, both of which cause lung cancer. [More]
Scripps collaborates with MD Anderson for clinically integrated cancer care program

Scripps collaborates with MD Anderson for clinically integrated cancer care program

Scripps Health and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have reached a partnership agreement to create Scripps MD Anderson Cancer Center, a comprehensive and clinically integrated cancer care program in San Diego that will provide adult cancer patients greater access to the most advanced oncology care available throughout Southern California. [More]
Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco sales within 1,000 feet of schools could reduce socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco density across neighborhoods, according to a study being published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. [More]
New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

New genetic markers linked to fast rate of nicotine metabolism in smokers may raise risk for lung cancer

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered new genetic markers associated with a fast rate of nicotine metabolism, which potentially leads smokers to smoke more, thereby, increasing their risk for lung cancer. [More]
Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

Scientists identify eight cancer types linked to excess weight and obesity

There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

A large, nationwide study published in the journal JAMA Oncology found that people who received transplants of cells collected from a donor's bone marrow the original source for blood stem cell transplants, developed decades ago had better self-reported psychological well-being, experienced fewer symptoms of a common post-transplant side effect called graft-vs.-host disease and were more likely to be back at work five years after transplantation than those whose transplanted cells were taken from the donor's bloodstream. [More]
Newfound role for PARP proteins could lead to therapeutic opportunities for cancer

Newfound role for PARP proteins could lead to therapeutic opportunities for cancer

Using technology they developed, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a previously unknown role of a certain class of proteins: as regulators of gene activity and RNA processing. [More]
New study uncovers how chromosomal changes impact tumor formation and growth

New study uncovers how chromosomal changes impact tumor formation and growth

As with most cancers, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells have abnormal amounts of chromosomes or DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) in their genomes. [More]
Analysis of biopsies during early treatment predicts patient’s response to melanoma immunotherapy

Analysis of biopsies during early treatment predicts patient’s response to melanoma immunotherapy

Immune response measured in tumor biopsies during the course of early treatment predicts which melanoma patients will benefit from specific immune checkpoint blockade drugs, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cancer Discovery. [More]
Rice University bioengineer receives NIH grant to study use of AAV-based therapy to combat ovarian cancer

Rice University bioengineer receives NIH grant to study use of AAV-based therapy to combat ovarian cancer

Rice University bioengineer Junghae Suh has been awarded a prestigious R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to research the use of viral gene therapy to fight ovarian cancer. [More]
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