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Gensignia's research in CT lung cancer screening recognized by ASCO

Gensignia's research in CT lung cancer screening recognized by ASCO

Gensignia scientific co-founders' research has been recognized in Clinical Cancer Advances 2015: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) on January 20, 2015. [More]
Research leads to new, better way to combat drug-resistant cancers

Research leads to new, better way to combat drug-resistant cancers

A team of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a new platform that can rapidly identify effective drug combinations for lung cancer patients whose tumors have stopped responding to targeted therapy. The research, which was supported in part by the National Foundation for Cancer Research, is a critical milestone on the road to personalized medicine. [More]
ASCO announces cancer Advance of the Year

ASCO announces cancer Advance of the Year

The American Society of Clinical Oncology for the first time announced its cancer Advance of the Year: the transformation of treatment for the most common form of adult leukemia. Until now, many patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have had few effective treatment options. Four newly approved therapies, however, are poised to dramatically improve the outlook for patients with the disease. [More]
New study demonstrates that vitamin D can protect people against colorectal cancer

New study demonstrates that vitamin D can protect people against colorectal cancer

A new study by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators demonstrates that vitamin D can protect some people with colorectal cancer by perking up the immune system's vigilance against tumor cells. [More]
Children of melanoma survivors need better sun protection, says UCLA researchers

Children of melanoma survivors need better sun protection, says UCLA researchers

In a groundbreaking new study, UCLA researchers have discovered that children of melanoma survivors are not adhering optimally to sun protection recommendations. This is concerning as sunburns are a major risk factor for melanoma, and children of survivors are at increased risk for developing the disease as adults. [More]
Two medical organizations recommend use of HPV test for cervical cancer screening

Two medical organizations recommend use of HPV test for cervical cancer screening

Two leading medical organizations say that using a Human papillomavirus (HPV) test alone for cervical cancer screening is an effective alternative to the current recommendation for screening with either cytology (the Pap test) alone or co-testing with cytology and HPV testing. [More]
New guidance recommends use of primary HPV test for cervical cancer screening

New guidance recommends use of primary HPV test for cervical cancer screening

About 80 million U.S. women ages 25 to 65 should be screened periodically by their health care providers for cervical cancer. At present, the standard way to do that is a Pap smear alone, or co-testing using both a Pap smear and a human papillomavirus (HPV) test. [More]
New Horses and Hope campaign launched to raise $1 million for cancer screening mobile unit

New Horses and Hope campaign launched to raise $1 million for cancer screening mobile unit

Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear today, along with representatives from the Kentucky Cancer Program, the University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center and KentuckyOne Health, launched a new Horses and Hope campaign to raise $1 million for a mobile unit to provide free or significantly reduced cost cancer screenings to underserved populations across Kentucky. [More]
Low alcohol consumption, plant-based diet reduce risk of obesity-related cancers

Low alcohol consumption, plant-based diet reduce risk of obesity-related cancers

Low alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet, both healthy habits aligning with current cancer prevention guidelines, are associated with reducing the risk of obesity-related cancers, a New York University study shows. [More]

NCI-designated Cancer Centers: An important source of care for cancer patients

You may have heard about National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Centers. Perhaps there is even one in your city. NCI-designated Cancer Centers are often located at well-known, academic institutions, such as the Mayo Clinic, and are an important source of care for cancer patients. [More]
Whole-genome sequencing can identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer

Whole-genome sequencing can identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have demonstrated that whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer, which can potentially lead to improvements in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and care. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered that brain tumors are capable of burning acetate for fuel, providing a new potential target for halting tumor growth. [More]

UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

Stanton McHardy, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Sciences, is partnering on a $1.9 million award to develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs. [More]

Study shows numeracy linked to bowel cancer screening

PEOPLE who have problems with numbers may be more likely to feel negative about bowel cancer screening, including fearing an abnormal result, while some think the test is disgusting or embarrassing, according to a Cancer Research UK supported study published today (Monday) in the Journal of Health Psychology. [More]
Researchers assemble first high-resolution, 3-D maps of folded genomes

Researchers assemble first high-resolution, 3-D maps of folded genomes

In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation -- a kind of "genomic origami" that allows the same genome to produce different types of cells. The research appears online today in Cell. [More]
MD Anderson president applauds FDA's approval of new vaccine for HPV-related cancers

MD Anderson president applauds FDA's approval of new vaccine for HPV-related cancers

The Food and Drug Administration's approval of a new vaccine that targets five additional strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) fortifies a proven cancer-prevention weapon, according to Ronald A. DePinho, M.D., president of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Preventive effect of tamoxifen drug for breast cancer remains virtually constant for 20 years

Preventive effect of tamoxifen drug for breast cancer remains virtually constant for 20 years

The preventive effect of breast cancer drug 'tamoxifen' remains virtually constant for at least 20 years - with rates reduced by around 30 per cent - new analysis published in The Lancet Oncology reveals. [More]
Drugs delay disease progression for women with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer

Drugs delay disease progression for women with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer

A new combination of cancer drugs delayed disease progression for patients with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, according to a multi-center phase II trial. The findings of the randomized study (S6-03) were presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-9, by Kerin Adelson, M.D., assistant professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center and chief quality officer at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven. [More]
Baylor-led researchers identify gene linked to familial glioma

Baylor-led researchers identify gene linked to familial glioma

An international consortium of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine has identified for the first time a gene associated with familial glioma (brain tumors that appear in two or more members of the same family) providing new support that certain people may be genetically predisposed to the disease. [More]
Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

Researchers develop new tool for global leaders to better control cancer

With the number of global cancer cases expected to increase by more than 50 percent by 2030, researchers around the globe have collaborated to create a new tool for global leaders to determine what actions they must take to better control cancer. [More]