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Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Skin cancer can affect anyone, regardless of age, race or gender. When it comes to skin cancer prevention and detection, however, it seems that men need to brush up on their knowledge. [More]
Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

Residential radon exposure may lead to hematologic cancer risk in women

A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic cancer (lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia) in women. The study is the first prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk, leading the authors to caution that it requires replication to better understand the association and whether it truly differs by sex. It appears early online in Environmental Research. [More]
Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Experimental therapy has over 90% remission rate for advanced leukemia patients

Twenty-seven of 29 patients with an advanced type of leukemia that had proved resistant to multiple other forms of therapy went into remission after their T cells (disease-fighting immune cells) were genetically engineered to fight their cancers. [More]
Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted. [More]
Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

Cancer survivors at risk of death after organ transplant

People who had cancer before receiving an organ transplant were more likely to die of any cause, die of cancer or develop a new cancer than organ recipients who did not previously have cancer, a new paper has found. However, the increased risk is less than that reported in some previous studies. [More]
Scientists identify critical biological factor for transforming adult somatic cells into stem cells

Scientists identify critical biological factor for transforming adult somatic cells into stem cells

In a new Cell Reports paper, a team led by John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D., of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, has identified and characterized a biological factor critical to the transformation of adult somatic cells (cells that are not sperm or egg cells) into stem cells. [More]
SI-2 molecule can inhibit tumor growth in breast cancer mouse model

SI-2 molecule can inhibit tumor growth in breast cancer mouse model

Cancer cells communicate with their environment through cell molecules that pass on signals to the inside of the cell. The signals help cancer cells multiply and migrate, spreading the disease. [More]
Clinical study shows watercress extract inhibits carcinogen activation in cigarette smokers

Clinical study shows watercress extract inhibits carcinogen activation in cigarette smokers

Watercress extract taken multiple times a day significantly inhibits the activation of a tobacco-derived carcinogen in cigarette smokers, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, partner with UPMC Cancer Center, demonstrated in a phase II clinical trial presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Multivitamin use prior to diagnosis may reduce effects of CIPN in breast cancer survivors

Multivitamin use prior to diagnosis may reduce effects of CIPN in breast cancer survivors

Researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, in collaboration with investigators from the cooperative group SWOG, have found that use of multivitamins prior to diagnosis may reduce the risk of neuropathy in breast cancer patients treated with the class of drugs known as taxanes. The team will present their findings at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
Genetic markers may influence how breast cancer patients respond to treatment

Genetic markers may influence how breast cancer patients respond to treatment

Two previously unrecognized genetic markers may predict whether breast cancer patients would benefit from chemotherapy followed by tamoxifen, according to preclinical research from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, in collaboration with the cooperative research group SWOG and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The results of this research will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016, to be held April 16-20 in New Orleans. [More]
Aspirin use linked with reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer

Aspirin use linked with reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer

A team of current and former Mayo Clinic researchers has discovered that aspirin use is associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma. The results are published in Hepatology. [More]
Experts discuss recent controversies related to breast cancer screening recommendations

Experts discuss recent controversies related to breast cancer screening recommendations

In 2015, American Cancer Society caused a stir in the oncology community—and among women in general—with the updated recommendation that women of average risk for breast cancer should commence annual mammography at age 45. [More]
Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke. [More]
SU2C Catalyst program to accelerate research on cancer prevention, detection and treatment

SU2C Catalyst program to accelerate research on cancer prevention, detection and treatment

Stand Up To Cancer, the charitable initiative aimed at bringing new treatments to cancer patients quickly, today announced Catalyst, a new program that will use funding and materials from the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostic and medical devices industries to accelerate research on cancer prevention, detection and treatment. [More]
Marriage may help prolong survival in cancer patients

Marriage may help prolong survival in cancer patients

New research has uncovered a link between being married and living longer among cancer patients, with the beneficial effect of marriage differing by race/ethnicity and place of birth. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings have important public health implications, given the rising numbers of unmarried individuals in the United States in addition to the growing aging population. [More]

Study links cancer survivorship to marriage, birthplace, race and ethnicity

Previous studies have shown that married patients with cancer fare better than unmarried cancer patients, surviving more often and longer. In a new study, published April 11 in the journal Cancer, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that the benefits of being married vary by race and ethnicity, with male non-Hispanic white bachelors experiencing the worst outcome. This group had a 24 percent higher mortality rate than their married counterparts. [More]
Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that higher levels of vitamin D - specifically serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D - are associated with a correspondingly reduced risk of cancer. The findings are published in the April 6, online issue of PLOS ONE. [More]
Novel metabolic pathways help cancer cells thrive under certain conditions

Novel metabolic pathways help cancer cells thrive under certain conditions

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a novel metabolic pathway that helps cancer cells thrive in conditions that are lethal to normal cells. [More]
Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Cutting energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods may help reduce cancer risk

Recent years have brought more attention to the role of carbohydrates in our diets and the differences between healthy and unhealthy carbs, most often in the context of weight control. A new study highlights one more reason to avoid sugary beverages, processed foods and other energy-dense carbohydrate-containing foods—cutting them may help reduce your risk of cancer. [More]
Inactivation of protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals

Inactivation of protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) report that inactivating a certain protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals. [More]
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