Cardiac Arrest News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiac Arrest News and Research

A cardiac arrest, also known as cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest, is the abrupt cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole.
Elderly cardiac patients receive less evidence-based treatment compared to younger patients

Elderly cardiac patients receive less evidence-based treatment compared to younger patients

People in their 80s and 90s are more likely to develop acute coronary syndrome than their younger counterparts. Despite this, they receive less therapy and diagnostic procedures. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has explored the topic. [More]

Powerheart G5 AED era arrives in the U.S. and Canada

Cardiac Science, an Opto Circuits group company and a global leader in AEDs, is proud to announce today that the Powerheart G5 AED era has arrived in the United States and Canada, representing both a technological milestone in the AED industry and the company's latest tool in fighting the world's No. 1 killer: sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). [More]
Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

A new, randomized clinical study co-authored by Cohen Children's Medical Center's chair of pediatrics says there is little neurological benefit to using therapeutic hypothermia to lower a child's core temperature after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. [More]
Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound—the technology used for sonograms and examining the heart—can increase the rate at which heart cells beat, researchers from Drexel University report. [More]
Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Administration of selenide protects heart tissue post cardiac arrest, shows study

Damage to heart muscle from insufficient blood supply during cardiac arrest and reperfusion injury after blood flow is restored can be reduced by nearly 90 percent if selenide, a form of the essential nutrient selenium, is administered intravenously in the wake of the attack, according to a new preclinical study by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) of Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection for the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
Egalet announces plans to commercialize SPRIX Nasal Spray and OXAYDO tablets

Egalet announces plans to commercialize SPRIX Nasal Spray and OXAYDO tablets

Egalet Corporation, a fully integrated specialty pharmaceutical company focused on developing, manufacturing and marketing innovative pain treatments, today announced its plans for the commercialization of SPRIX (ketorolac tromethamine) Nasal Spray and OXAYDO (oxycodone HCI, USP) tablets for oral use only –CII. [More]

NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

The NIH-National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has awarded Brian W. Roberts, MD, emergency medicine physician at Cooper University Health Care and Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University (CMSRU), a Mentored Patient-Oriented Career Development grant (K23) to study post-resuscitation partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. [More]
Egalet announces net revenues of $1.9 million for 2014

Egalet announces net revenues of $1.9 million for 2014

Egalet Corporation today reported financial results for the year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
Accidental fentanyl exposure in children can be fatal

Accidental fentanyl exposure in children can be fatal

Infants and children are at a higher risk of accidental exposure to fentanyl patches—adhesive patches used to deliver higher doses of some opiates through the skin to relieve chronic pain. [More]
Discoveries by WA research team offer further treatment hope for victims of stroke

Discoveries by WA research team offer further treatment hope for victims of stroke

A West Australian research team has made a series of discoveries which may help to minimise the damage that a stroke can cause. [More]
Meridian Health to celebrate American Heart Month, raise awareness for women's heart health

Meridian Health to celebrate American Heart Month, raise awareness for women's heart health

For the seventh year in a row, Meridian Health's Red Dress event will celebrate American Heart Month and raise awareness for women's heart health. The fun-filled, health-focused event will take place at Watermark, a chic lounge in Asbury Park. In partnership with The Heart Truth campaign, sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Meridian CardioVascular Network's Red Dress event will showcase fashions from the famous Red Dress Collection. [More]
UMHS opens Massey Emergency Critical Care Center

UMHS opens Massey Emergency Critical Care Center

They come from highway accident scenes and nursing home beds, from factories and farm fields, from suburban homes, downtown sidewalks and small community hospitals. [More]
Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from numerous centers from around the world are gathering at the Cardiology 2015: the 18th Annual Update on Pediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease conference, sponsored by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Phoenix Children's Hospital on Feb. 11 to Feb. 15 in Scottsdale, Ariz. [More]
Researchers demonstrate advantages of implanted defibrillator in preventing non-ischaemic heart failure

Researchers demonstrate advantages of implanted defibrillator in preventing non-ischaemic heart failure

Sudden cardiac arrest is a possible cause of death in patients with non-ischaemic cardiac muscle weakness, i.e. a type of heart failure caused by genetics or for which no cause is known. Now, researchers at the University Department of Internal Medicine II at the MedUni Vienna (Clinical Department of Cardiology), as part of an international cooperation, have successfully demonstrated the advantages of an implanted defibrillator (ICD) as a means of prevention in patients with moderately restricted cardiac function, and that patients with the condition must be treated as carefully as patients with ischaemic heart failure which has developed following a heart attack, for example. [More]
Study: Simple blood test could predict risk of developing dementia

Study: Simple blood test could predict risk of developing dementia

Scientists at Rigshopitalet, Herlev Hospital and the University of Copenhagen identify a new biomarker that can predict the risk of developing dementia by way of a simple blood test. In the long term, this could mean better prevention and thus at least postponement of the illness and at best evading the development all together. [More]
Ohio State cardiologist answers questions relating to Hands-Only CPR

Ohio State cardiologist answers questions relating to Hands-Only CPR

When a person's heart stops beating, every second counts. However, bystanders often fear giving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to a victim. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement