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A cardiac arrest, also known as cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest, is the abrupt cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole.
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years--a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Cell powerhouses may be good therapeutic target for brain injury

Cell powerhouses may be good therapeutic target for brain injury

Cell powerhouses are typically long and lean, but with brain injury such as stroke or trauma, they can quickly become bloated and dysfunctional, say scientists who documented the phenomena in real time for the first time in a living brain. [More]
New article highlights success of Spanish system in deceased organ donation

New article highlights success of Spanish system in deceased organ donation

Spain is leading the world in deceased organ donation. A new article published in the American Journal of Transplantation contains important information that can help other countries learn from the success of the Spanish system to help address the worldwide problem of transplant organ shortages. [More]
New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

Recommendations for introducing peanut-containing foods to infants, compiled by an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published this week. The guidelines are intended to help prevent the development of peanut allergy. They provide specific recommendations for infants with differing risk levels for developing peanut allergy. [More]
Ardelyx initiates two clinical trials to evaluate new treatment for hyperkalemia

Ardelyx initiates two clinical trials to evaluate new treatment for hyperkalemia

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on enhancing the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal and cardiorenal diseases, today announced the initiation of a Phase 3 clinical trial and an onset-of-action clinical trial evaluating RDX7675 in patients with hyperkalemia, a potentially life-threatening condition common in patients with cardiorenal disease. [More]
Critical illness events linked to delayed discharge from hospital for neighboring patients

Critical illness events linked to delayed discharge from hospital for neighboring patients

In a research letter published Dec. 27, 2016, in JAMA, University of Chicago physicians describe a new concern for patients in the hospital: distractions caused by the misfortune of other patients. [More]
Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Hospitals in which the administration of epinephrine to patients whose hearts have stopped is delayed beyond five minutes have significantly lower survival rates of those patients, a new study led by a cardiologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center finds. [More]
Women with CHD more likely to have safe and healthy pregnancies, study finds

Women with CHD more likely to have safe and healthy pregnancies, study finds

Congenital heart disease (CHD), a group of abnormalities in the heart that develop before birth - including holes in the heart, leaky or narrow valves, and incomplete or missing parts - affects nearly one percent of all babies born in the United States each year - upwards of 40,000 infants. [More]
Experts to discuss use of holograms and 3D printing at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016

Experts to discuss use of holograms and 3D printing at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016

EuroEcho-Imaging 2016 brings advanced techniques to the bedside with international experts set to discuss the use of holograms and 3D printing to guide interventions. [More]
New clinical study to examine safety and outcomes of body cooling in cardiac arrest patients

New clinical study to examine safety and outcomes of body cooling in cardiac arrest patients

The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland has opened a clinical trial to study whether rapidly cooling the body temperature of patients whose hearts stop due to massive blood loss will give surgeons extra time to find and repair injuries, and in turn, help save their lives. [More]
Study evaluates outcomes of hypothermia treatment among patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest

Study evaluates outcomes of hypothermia treatment among patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest

In a study appearing in the October 4 issue of JAMA, Paul S. Chan, M.D., of Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, and colleagues evaluated the association of hypothermia treatment with survival to hospital discharge and with favorable neurological survival at hospital discharge among patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. [More]
Astronaut Kate Rubins transmits unique message to organizers of World Extreme Medicine Exposition

Astronaut Kate Rubins transmits unique message to organizers of World Extreme Medicine Exposition

Kate Rubins, one of three astronauts aboard the International Space Station, has transmitted a message of support to the organisers of the World Extreme Medicine Conference and Expo, which will be held at Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh on Friday 18 to Monday 21 November. [More]
Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

For years, marketers and other commercial data-miners have been using Twitter's vast database of "tweets" to gauge consumer attitudes and track events. Now medical researchers are getting in on the trend. [More]
Royal Philips partners with World Heart Federation to help people better manage cardiac health

Royal Philips partners with World Heart Federation to help people better manage cardiac health

In celebration of World Heart Day on September 29, 2016, Royal Philips, a leading health technology company, today announced a new partnership with the World Heart Federation to help people better manage their heart health. [More]
ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

ACCA annual congress shines lights on managing risk in acute cardiovascular care

Acute Cardiovascular Care 2016 will put a spotlight on managing high risk patients. The annual congress of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology, is held 15 to 17 October at the Centro de Congressos de Lisboa in Lisbon, Portugal. [More]
UCL PhD students show progress in developing ground-breaking medical devices

UCL PhD students show progress in developing ground-breaking medical devices

Two PhD students, who secured sponsorship from leading medical device designer and manufacturer ITL, have revealed progress on the development of ground-breaking medical devices. [More]
Heart specialists to examine benefit of ECG screening for student athletes

Heart specialists to examine benefit of ECG screening for student athletes

UT Southwestern Medical Center heart specialists will study whether electrocardiograms (ECGs) are useful in identifying Texas high school student athletes who are at risk of suffering sudden cardiac death. [More]
Foul smelling gas could help people with diabetes recover from heart complications

Foul smelling gas could help people with diabetes recover from heart complications

A gas that was formerly known for its noxious qualities could help people with diabetes recover from common heart and blood vessel complications, concludes research led by the University of Exeter Medical School. [More]
Research shows AEDs fail to save lives without basic life support education

Research shows AEDs fail to save lives without basic life support education

Automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) fail to save lives when the public does not have basic life support education, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2016. [More]
Risk of motor vehicle accidents increased by 50% in ICD patients

Risk of motor vehicle accidents increased by 50% in ICD patients

The risk of traffic accidents is increased by 50% in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) compared to age and gender matched controls, according to a Danish nationwide registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. [More]
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