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A cardiac arrest, also known as cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest, is the abrupt cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole.
Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone (O3) face an increased risk of dying from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, according to the study "Long-Term Ozone Exposure and Mortality in a Large Prospective Study" published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

Pioneer calls on electrophysiologists to reexamine substrate mapping for deadly heart arrhythmia

A pioneer in developing life-saving therapies for a deadly heart arrhythmia has called on electrophysiologists to reexamine a widely used technique to guide the treatment of the faulty electrical impulses responsible for these abnormal heartbeats. [More]
New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

The number of people living in high-rise buildings in rising, but along with the convenience and panoramic views of a downtown condo comes a risk: a new study found that survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute physician researcher has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop a risk assessment tool that could identify patients susceptible to sudden cardiac arrest, a usually fatal heart rhythm malfunction. [More]
Ardelyx announces positive results from RDX022 clinical study for treatment of hyperkalemia

Ardelyx announces positive results from RDX022 clinical study for treatment of hyperkalemia

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on gastrointestinal and cardio-renal diseases, today announced positive results of an open label clinical study evaluating the pharmacodynamic (PD) activity of RDX022 in healthy adult volunteers. [More]
Emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve cardiac arrest survival rates

Emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve cardiac arrest survival rates

Although survival rates for people who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital are extremely low in most places, emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve survival rates and functional outcomes in any community and urge additional federal funding for cardiac resuscitation research in an editorial published online last Wednesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("IOM Says Times to Act to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival ... Here's How"). [More]
LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator approved for children at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator approved for children at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for the LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator. The LifeVest is approved for certain children who are at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, but are not candidates for an implantable defibrillator due to certain medical conditions or lack of parental consent. [More]
Bridion injection approved to reverse effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs used during certain types of surgery

Bridion injection approved to reverse effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs used during certain types of surgery

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Bridion (sugammadex) injection to reverse the effects of neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium bromide and vecuronium bromide, which are used during certain types of surgery in adults. [More]
Higher nurse staffing levels and better working conditions improve survival following IHCA

Higher nurse staffing levels and better working conditions improve survival following IHCA

Patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) have low survival rates--but why do some hospitals achieve higher survival than others? Higher nurse staffing levels and better working conditions may be part of the answer, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care. [More]
Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest improves survival and neurological outcomes

Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest improves survival and neurological outcomes

Survivors of cardiac arrest who remain in comas have better survival and neurological outcomes when their body temperatures are lowered, according to new research by Dr. Sarah Perman at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Portrazza approved to treat patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer

Portrazza approved to treat patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Portrazza (necitumumab) in combination with two forms of chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received medication specifically for treating their advanced lung cancer. [More]
New study finds evidence to support meperidine-associated seizure risk

New study finds evidence to support meperidine-associated seizure risk

Meperidine, an opioid analgesic commonly used to control shivering in accidental or therapeutic hypothermia, has been linked to increased seizure risk, but a new study finds little published evidence to support this risk. [More]
Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Although the vast majority of pediatric spine surgeries are safe, a handful of neuromuscular conditions seem to fuel the risk of cardiac arrest during such operations, according to research led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. [More]
Loss of consciousness key outcome marker in SAH

Loss of consciousness key outcome marker in SAH

A large study of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage confirms loss of consciousness as a clinically important indicator of outcome. [More]
Researchers find ranibizumab drug as effective alternative to laser therapy for treating diabetic retinopathy

Researchers find ranibizumab drug as effective alternative to laser therapy for treating diabetic retinopathy

In a randomized clinical trial of more than 300 participants, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that ranibizumab — a drug most commonly used to treat retinal swelling in people with diabetes — is an effective alternative to laser therapy for treating the most severe, potentially blinding form of diabetic retinal disease. Results of the government-sponsored study also show that the drug therapy carries fewer side effects than the currently used laser treatment. [More]
Brain scans may predict possibility of recovering from coma

Brain scans may predict possibility of recovering from coma

Brain scans of people in a coma may help predict who will regain consciousness, according to a study published in the November 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at connections between areas of the brain that play a role in regulating consciousness. [More]

Study compares new cardiopulmonary resuscitation with standard CPR in cardiac arrest

Continuous chest compression, touted as the new way to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, was not an improvement over standard CPR, according to findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine today. The University of Alabama at Birmingham was one of eight United States and Canadian universities involved in the study, the largest such study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest ever conducted. [More]
BLS transported patients more likely to survive than ALS transported patients

BLS transported patients more likely to survive than ALS transported patients

Patients with trauma, stroke, heart attack and respiratory failure who were transported by basic life support (BLS) ambulances had a better chance of survival than patients who were transported by advanced life support (ALS) ambulances, a study of Medicare patients in urban counties nationwide found. [More]
Federal judge grants permanent injunction against South Dakota medical laser manufacturer

Federal judge grants permanent injunction against South Dakota medical laser manufacturer

A federal judge in the U.S. District Court for the District of South Dakota yesterday granted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration a permanent injunction against 2035 Inc. and Robert "Larry" Lytle, doing business as QLasers PMA and 2035 PMA. [More]
ASA: Epidural or spinal anesthesia preferred for most cesarean deliveries

ASA: Epidural or spinal anesthesia preferred for most cesarean deliveries

New research could ease the minds of expectant mothers who may be nervous about epidurals or spinal anesthesia for childbirth. A study of New York state hospitals, published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, found the rate of anesthesia-related complications in women who received epidural or spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery decreased 25 percent over the past decade. [More]
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