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A cardiac arrest, also known as cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest, is the abrupt cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole.
Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

Women delay seeking medical care for heart symptoms, put health at risk

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). [More]
Low vitamin D levels linked to poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest

Low vitamin D levels linked to poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest

Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of poor brain function after sudden cardiac arrest by seven-fold, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Dr Jin Wi from Korea. Vitamin D deficiency also led to a higher chance of dying after sudden cardiac arrest. [More]
Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Heart failure is a debilitating, and life-threatening, condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body. When heart failure continues to progress and worsen over time, the persistent condition is known as chronic heart failure. [More]
Large-scale study results of cardiac arrest cases now available on ScienceDirect

Large-scale study results of cardiac arrest cases now available on ScienceDirect

The results of a four-year international study of 2060 cardiac arrest cases across 15 hospitals published and available now on ScienceDirect. [More]
Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea threatens public health and safety

Public health and safety are threatened by the increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, which now afflicts at least 25 million adults in the U.S., according to the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project. Several new studies highlight the destructive nature of obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic disease that increases the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and depression. [More]
Screening and treating OSA patients prior to surgery reduce risk of cardiovascular complications

Screening and treating OSA patients prior to surgery reduce risk of cardiovascular complications

Scheduled for surgery? New research suggests that you may want to get screened and treated for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before going under the knife. According to a first-of-its-kind study in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists-, patients with OSA who are diagnosed and treated for the condition prior to surgery are less likely to develop serious cardiovascular complications such as cardiac arrest or shock. [More]
Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Eli Lilly and Company today announced that the RAISE trial, a Phase III study of ramucirumab (CYRAMZA) in combination with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), met its primary endpoint of overall survival. [More]
Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

A gene crucial for brain and heart development may also be associated with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the most common cause of early mortality in epilepsy patients. [More]
Football players are found to be carriers of sickle cell trait later in life

Football players are found to be carriers of sickle cell trait later in life

From 2000 to 2014, nine collegiate football players unexpectedly collapsed and died during training. The cause? Muscle breakdown leading to organ failure. [More]
Measuring levels of sex hormones in patients' blood may identify risk of sudden cardiac arrest

Measuring levels of sex hormones in patients' blood may identify risk of sudden cardiac arrest

Measuring the levels of sex hormones in patients' blood may identify patients likely to suffer a sudden cardiac arrest, a heart rhythm disorder that is fatal in 95 percent of patients. [More]

People should not rely on YouTube videos to save lives

Only a handful of CPR and basic life support (BLS) videos available on YouTube provide instructions which are consistent with recent health guidelines, according to a new study published in Emergency Medicine Australasia, the journal for the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM). [More]
New method to predict optimal place and number of automated external defibrillators

New method to predict optimal place and number of automated external defibrillators

A new method to predict the optimal number and location of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) was presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Benjamin Dahan from France. [More]
ACCA Clinical Decision-Making Toolkit mobile app helps make quick and correct decision

ACCA Clinical Decision-Making Toolkit mobile app helps make quick and correct decision

The ACCA Clinical Decision-Making Toolkit mobile app is now available on the App Store and Google Play. When dealing with acute cardiovascular diseases, a few seconds can make the difference and instant access to the best recommendations can save lives. [More]
New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally. [More]

Italy's amateur soccer league selects Cardiac Science as certified AED supplier

Italian soccer leagues have been at the forefront of promoting automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at sporting events ever since 2012 when Piermario Morosini, a 25-year-old midfielder for Livorno, suffered sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during a match and died. [More]
Team debriefings linked with good neurological survival for kids suffering from cardiac arrest

Team debriefings linked with good neurological survival for kids suffering from cardiac arrest

A new study found that staff members who joined structured team debriefings after emergency care for children suffering in-hospital cardiac arrests improved their CPR performance and substantially increased the rates of patients surviving with favorable neurological outcomes. [More]
Phase 3 ASPIRE clinical trial meets primary endpoint of progression-free survival

Phase 3 ASPIRE clinical trial meets primary endpoint of progression-free survival

Amgen and its subsidiary, Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced that a planned interim analysis demonstrated that the Phase 3 clinical trial ASPIRE (CArfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and DexamethaSone versus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone for the treatment of PatIents with Relapsed Multiple MyEloma) met its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS). [More]
New joint ESC/ESA Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery

New joint ESC/ESA Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery

The publication of the new joint ESC/ESA Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management introduces a number of recommendations in the field. Among other topics, the Guidelines include updated information on the use of clinical indices and biomarkers in risk assessment, and the use of novel anticoagulants, statins, aspirin and beta-blockers in risk mitigation. [More]

Study: New EMS system increases survival rate for sudden cardiac arrest victims in Arizona

A new system that sent patients to designated cardiac receiving centers dramatically increased the survival rate of victims of sudden cardiac arrest in Arizona, according to a study published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine. [More]