Cardiology News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiology News and Research

Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The field is commonly divided in the branches of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology.
BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

Childhood high blood pressure (HBP) is a serious public health challenge worldwide due to associated increases in risk of end organ damages and correlation with HBP in adulthood. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) has been reported to increase significantly among United States children and adolescents from 1988-1994 to 1999-2008, but little is known about recent trends in BP values and elevated BP. [More]
Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

T cells from patients with melanoma can trigger a protective immune response against the disease according to a new study out of University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
Coronary artery calcification scans can help identify patients at risk for early death

Coronary artery calcification scans can help identify patients at risk for early death

A study in the online edition of Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that coronary artery calcification (CAC) scans could help physicians identify patients at risk for premature death. [More]
UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

UChicago Medicine, Little Company of Mary partner to boost community access to specialty care for children

The University of Chicago Medicine and Little Company of Mary Hospital and Health Care Centers are partnering to expand care for infants and children by developing a subspecialty center on the community hospital's Evergreen Park campus that will provide enhanced neonatology and pediatric services. [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
Experts call for healthy lifestyle initiatives to combat non-communicable diseases

Experts call for healthy lifestyle initiatives to combat non-communicable diseases

A group of the world's top doctors and scientists working in cardiology and preventive medicine have issued a call to action to tackle the global problem of deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as heart problems, diabetes and cancer, through healthy lifestyle initiatives. [More]
Comorbid anxiety ‘a crucial target’ for treatment in bipolar disorder

Comorbid anxiety ‘a crucial target’ for treatment in bipolar disorder

Almost half of patients with bipolar disorder will have comorbid anxiety disorder in their lifetime, show the findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Elsevier announces highlights of 2014 Impact Factor performance

Elsevier announces highlights of 2014 Impact Factor performance

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the highlights of its journal Impact Factor performance in 2014. According to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) published by Thomson Reuters, Elsevier saw 55% of its journal Impact Factors increase from 2013 to 2014, ahead of the aggregate across other journals. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
Penn Medicine scientists identify stem-like 'progenitor' cell that produces heart muscle cells

Penn Medicine scientists identify stem-like 'progenitor' cell that produces heart muscle cells

Future therapies for failing hearts are likely to include stem-like cells and associated growth factors that regenerate heart muscle. Scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have just taken an important step towards that future by identifying a stem-like "progenitor" cell that produces only heart muscle cells. [More]
Uninterrupted NOAC treatment during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is safe, shows research

Uninterrupted NOAC treatment during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is safe, shows research

Uninterrupted treatment with novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is safe, reveals research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 by Dr Carsten Wunderlich, senior consultant in the Department of Invasive Electrophysiology, Heart Centre Dresden, Germany. [More]
Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles. [More]
First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

The first ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 and published in EP Europace. [More]
Life-saving defibrillators are grossly underutilized, shows study

Life-saving defibrillators are grossly underutilized, shows study

Heart attack patients age 65 and older who have reduced heart function might still benefit from implanted defibrillators, according to a Duke Medicine study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Alnylam presents positive Phase 1 ALN-AT3 trial results in hemophilia at ISTH 2015 Congress

Alnylam presents positive Phase 1 ALN-AT3 trial results in hemophilia at ISTH 2015 Congress

Additional study results from 12 hemophilia A and B subjects demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of ALN-AT3 achieved potent and dose-dependent knockdown of AT of up to 86%. AT knockdown was highly durable, with effects lasting over two months after the last dose, supporting further evaluation of a once-monthly subcutaneous dose regimen. [More]
CardiAQ Valve Technologies announces first human implant of transcatheter bioprosthetic mitral heart valve

CardiAQ Valve Technologies announces first human implant of transcatheter bioprosthetic mitral heart valve

CardiAQ Valve Technologies (CardiAQ), which has developed the world’s first self-conforming and self-anchoring technology for nonsurgical transfemoral-transseptal percutaneous Transcatheter Mitral Valve Implantation (TMVI), today announced that its second-generation bioprosthetic mitral heart valve was successfully implanted as a compassionate treatment into a 72-year-old male suffering from severe mitral regurgitation (MR 4+) with multiple co-morbidities and ineligible for alternate treatment modalities. [More]
Israeli researchers establish novel optogenetic method for cardiac pacing and resynchronization

Israeli researchers establish novel optogenetic method for cardiac pacing and resynchronization

Israeli researchers have successfully established a new approach for pacing the heart and synchronizing its mechanical activity without the use of a conventional electrical pacemaker. This novel biologic strategy employs light-sensitive genes that can be injected into the heart and then activated by flashes of blue light. [More]
UCSF researchers propose systematic methods to determine causes of death in patients with CIEDs

UCSF researchers propose systematic methods to determine causes of death in patients with CIEDs

The current monitoring of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers and defibrillators may be underestimating device problems, according to UC San Francisco researchers who propose systematic methods to determine accurate causes of sudden death in those with CIEDs as well as improved monitoring for device concerns. [More]
Study: High-normal BP in young adults spells heart failure risk in later life

Study: High-normal BP in young adults spells heart failure risk in later life

Mild elevations in blood pressure considered to be in the upper range of normal during young adulthood can lead to subclinical heart damage by middle age -- a condition that sets the stage for full-blown heart failure, according to findings of a federally funded study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins. [More]
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