Cardiology News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiology News and Research

Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The field is commonly divided in the branches of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology.
New tool facilitates shared decision-making between physicians and patients with chest pain

New tool facilitates shared decision-making between physicians and patients with chest pain

Patients visiting a hospital emergency department with chest pain who engaged with their physician in shared decision-making using a tool called Chest Pain Choice showed improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up care options compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician without the use of this decision aid, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Paramedics often give heart rhythm stabilizing drugs to patients who are suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when they fail to regain a stable heart rhythm after electrical shock treatment. [More]
Two common approaches to post-operative AF equally safe, effective

Two common approaches to post-operative AF equally safe, effective

Cleveland Clinic researchers, as part of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, have found that two common approaches to post-operative atrial fibrillation - rhythm control and rate control - are equally safe and effective. [More]
New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

A new stem cell therapy significantly improved long-term health outcomes in patients with severe and end-stage heart failure in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Two established atrial fibrillation ablation techniques show similar effects, safety outcomes

Two established atrial fibrillation ablation techniques show similar effects, safety outcomes

Two established techniques for correcting the root cause of the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation show similar effects and safety outcomes, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Mount Sinai Health System recognized as 'Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality' by HRC Foundation

Mount Sinai Health System recognized as 'Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality' by HRC Foundation

Six campuses of the Mount Sinai Health System - The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, Mount Sinai West (formerly known as Mount Sinai Roosevelt), Mount Sinai Queens, and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai - have been recognized as "Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality" by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the country's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization. [More]
New implantable medical device fails to reduce rates of heart failure-related hospitalization

New implantable medical device fails to reduce rates of heart failure-related hospitalization

A new implantable medical device intended to help patients with heart failure by stimulating the vagus nerve did not significantly reduce rates of heart failure-related hospitalization or death from any cause in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

An investigational stem cell therapy derived from patients' own blood marrow significantly improved outcomes in patients with severe heart failure, according to a study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. [More]
Tests used for diagnosing heart disease appear to function differently for women and men

Tests used for diagnosing heart disease appear to function differently for women and men

Tests used to diagnose and assess the severity of coronary artery disease appear to function differently for women and men who have stable symptoms, according to researchers from Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]

Edema Guard Monitor appears to reduce heart failure-related hospitalizations by more than half

In patients with heart failure, use of an investigational device that monitors the accumulation of fluid in the lungs appeared to cut heart failure-related hospitalizations by more than half, meeting the study's primary endpoint, and reduced deaths from any cause by 39 percent per year compared with standard assessment and treatment, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with cell therapy experience fewer cardiac events

End-stage heart failure patients treated with stem cells harvested from their own bone marrow experienced 37 percent fewer cardiac events - including deaths and heart failure hospital admissions - than a placebo-controlled group, according to a new study. [More]
Study evaluates long-term outcomes of TAVR with SAPIEN 3 in intermediate-risk patients

Study evaluates long-term outcomes of TAVR with SAPIEN 3 in intermediate-risk patients

To account for baseline differences, TAVR patients were compared by a propensity score analysis with patients randomized to receive surgical intervention in a precursor study, PARTNER 2A. Propensity scoring analysis is a statistical technique used to reduce bias from potential confounding variables, which in this case was used to identify surgical patients from a previous study who would be comparable to TAVR patients in this study. [More]
Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

Ischemic postconditioning for STEMI patients shows no clinical outcomes

A large randomized controlled trial of ischemic postconditioning in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to show that this procedure significantly reduces death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Evolocumab could be more effective than ezetimibe in lowering cholesterol in statin-intolerant patients

Evolocumab could be more effective than ezetimibe in lowering cholesterol in statin-intolerant patients

In the first major trial of its kind, Cleveland Clinic researchers used a blinded rechallenge with atorvastatin or placebo to objectively confirm the presence of muscle-related symptoms in patients with a history of intolerance to multiple statins and found that evolocumab (a PCSK9 inhibitor) was a more effective option to lower cholesterol than ezetimibe in these patients. [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Patient-oriented tool helps shared decision-making between patients and physicians for chest pain

Patient-oriented tool helps shared decision-making between patients and physicians for chest pain

Patients who arrive at the emergency department with low-risk chest pain and talk through treatment options with a physician show improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up options, compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Deferred stent implantation fails to show benefit in STEMI patients

Delayed or deferred stent implantation in patients experiencing the deadliest form of heart attack--ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—failed to reduce death from any cause, hospitalization for heart failure, subsequent heart attacks or the need for a repeat procedure to restore blood flow to the heart, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Frequent TAVR to replace damaged aortic heart valve improves patient outcomes

Frequent TAVR to replace damaged aortic heart valve improves patient outcomes

The more frequently a hospital performs a minimally invasive technique called transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR, to replace a damaged aortic heart valve, the better patients fare, on average, immediately after the procedure, researchers reported at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Apple body shape linked to higher heart risk than pear-shape in diabetics

Apple body shape linked to higher heart risk than pear-shape in diabetics

People with type 1 or 2 diabetes who have apple-shaped bodies with excessive fat around the abdomen and stomach, can be at higher risk of serious heart disease than patients with pear-shaped figures who store excess fat around their hips, according to a new study from Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute and John Hopkins University. [More]
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