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Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The field is commonly divided in the branches of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology.
Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

Higher-fat DASH diet significantly reduces blood pressure and triglycerides

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, which is high in fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy foods, significantly lowers blood pressure as well as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [More]
Novel therapy may help in diagnosing, treating heart disease in humans

Novel therapy may help in diagnosing, treating heart disease in humans

A novel therapy tested by University of Guelph scientists for treating a fatal heart disorder in dogs might ultimately help in diagnosing and treating heart disease in humans. [More]
Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

A quick screening method has been used for the first time in a standard open laboratory to identify and test promising anti-Ebola drugs. This approach increases the possibility of finding new therapies faster. [More]
American College of Cardiology to honor LA BioMed researcher with Distinguished Teacher Award

American College of Cardiology to honor LA BioMed researcher with Distinguished Teacher Award

John Michael Criley, MD, a Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute researcher, will receive the 2016 Distinguished Teacher Award from the American College of Cardiology on April 4 at the organization's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago, IL. [More]
New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

A new classification of coronary congenital diseases is set to help surgeons identify secondary defects in the operating theatre. The scheme is outlined in a novel European Society of Cardiology position paper published today in Cardiovascular Research.1 Clinical cardiologists will also know what to look for on cardiovascular images. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Glaucoma patients may experience increased eye pressure as the result of performing several different head-down positions while practicing yoga, according to a new study published by researchers at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Palliative care improves care quality, reduces costs for advanced cancer patients with comorbidities

Palliative care improves care quality, reduces costs for advanced cancer patients with comorbidities

Patients with incurable cancer and numerous other serious health conditions who consulted with a palliative care team within two days of hospitalization had significant savings in hospital costs, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients at high genetic risk of developing bipolar disorder avert the onset of the illness, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
UC San Diego School of Medicine study compares payments among different specialties

UC San Diego School of Medicine study compares payments among different specialties

The Physician Payments Sunshine Act, passed under the Affordable Care Act, requires all pharmaceutical and medical device companies to report payments to physicians, including consulting fees, gifts, speaking fees, meals, travel and research grants. This information is searchable to the public on a database called Open Payments, managed by the Centers for Medicare & Medical Services. [More]
Study shows clear role of bacteria in modulating immune function in the lungs

Study shows clear role of bacteria in modulating immune function in the lungs

Microbiota--the trillions of bacteria that co-exist in the body--regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to generate immune responses, according to a study led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Argon Medical Devices completes acquisition of three vascular products from Rex Medical

Argon Medical Devices completes acquisition of three vascular products from Rex Medical

Argon Medical Devices, Inc. announced the completed acquisition of three vascular products from Rex Medical, LLC. The OptionELITE Retrievable Vena Cava Filter, CLEANER Rotational Thrombectomy System, and UltraStream Chronic Hemodialysis Catheter are now wholly owned by Argon Medical Devices, Inc. [More]
Heart attack patients with bypass history more likely to have delayed treatment

Heart attack patients with bypass history more likely to have delayed treatment

Heart attack patients who had previously undergone cardiac bypass surgery are about twice as likely to have a delay in receiving angioplasty, or another form of revascularization, compared to heart attack patients who had no history of bypass surgery or previous angioplasty. [More]
Restoring blood flow quickly after heart attack symptoms appear may help reduce heart damage

Restoring blood flow quickly after heart attack symptoms appear may help reduce heart damage

While hospitals have made strides in reducing the time it takes to treat heart attack patients once they arrive at the hospital, patient delays recognizing symptoms and seeking treatment are associated with increased damage to the heart, according to a study published online today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. [More]
Music therapy in conjunction with standard rehabilitation benefits COPD patients

Music therapy in conjunction with standard rehabilitation benefits COPD patients

Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and other chronic respiratory disorders who received music therapy in conjunction with standard rehabilitation saw an improvement in symptoms, psychological well-being and quality of life compared to patients receiving rehabilitation alone, according to a new study by researchers at The Louis Armstrong Center of Music and Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel (MSBI). [More]
Closing patient knowledge gap could encourage cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials

Closing patient knowledge gap could encourage cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials

A five-center national study led by Neal Meropol, MD, and a team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center demonstrated that a little information goes a long way in encouraging cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials, a decision that could be potentially lifesaving. [More]
Add-on lamotrigine enhances bipolar depression treatment

Add-on lamotrigine enhances bipolar depression treatment

Combining lamotrigine with quetiapine improves the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder, with the benefits maintained for at least a year, show findings from the CEQUEL trial. [More]
Penn study explores bleeding complications linked to cardiac stent placement techniques

Penn study explores bleeding complications linked to cardiac stent placement techniques

More than 375,000 American each year experience a heart attack, during which blood flow to a part of the heart is impeded by blocked arteries. Physicians often treat patients with stents, which prop open the arteries to allow blood to flow again. They use two approaches to place stents: transradial, or entry of the catheter which delivers the stent through the wrist, or transfemoral, in which the catheter is placed through the groin. [More]
Mount Sinai cardiologist honored with Spain's highest health distinction

Mount Sinai cardiologist honored with Spain's highest health distinction

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, was honored by the Government of Spain with the highest health distinction awarded in Spain. [More]
Cardiome files NDS with Health Canada's TPD for approval of intravenous vernakalant

Cardiome files NDS with Health Canada's TPD for approval of intravenous vernakalant

Cardiome Pharma Corp. (NASDAQ: CRME / TSX: COM) today announced the filing of a New Drug Submission (NDS) with Health Canada's Therapeutic Products Directorate (TPD) seeking Canadian approval of intravenous vernakalant for the rapid conversion of recent onset atrial fibrillation (AF) to sinus rhythm in adults with AF for up to 7 days. [More]
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