Cardiology News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiology News and Research

Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The field is commonly divided in the branches of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology.
Perioperative aspirin increases risk of serious bleeding after non-heart-related surgery

Perioperative aspirin increases risk of serious bleeding after non-heart-related surgery

​Patients given aspirin to prevent heart problems after non-heart-related surgery had a higher risk of serious bleeding than the patients who did not receive aspirin. [More]
Heparin proves effective than bivalirudin in patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention after heart attack

Heparin proves effective than bivalirudin in patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention after heart attack

In a comparison of two blood-thinning medications, heparin was associated with significantly fewer major cardiovascular events at 28 days than bivalirudin in patients receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention after a heart attack, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Study shows administering steroids during cardiac surgery requiring bypass can cause harm

Giving patients steroids at the time of heart surgery does not improve health outcomes and appears to put them at greater risk of having a heart attack in the days following surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Injecting bone marrow derived stem cells directly into heart muscle improves heart function

Injecting bone marrow derived stem cells directly into heart muscle improves heart function

Patients with severe ischemic heart disease and heart failure can benefit from a new treatment in which stem cells found in bone marrow are injected directly into the heart muscle, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Bariatric surgery more effective than intensive medical therapy for managing type 2 diabetes

Bariatric surgery more effective than intensive medical therapy for managing type 2 diabetes

​Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy - two of the most commonly used bariatric surgeries - are more effective than intensive medical therapy alone when it comes to managing uncontrolled type 2 diabetes in overweight or obese patients after three years, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Cognitive deficits in bipolar patients ‘not homogenous’

Patients with bipolar disorder can be separated into three groups based on their cognitive performance, a study suggests. [More]
Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

A study by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows bariatric surgery is a highly effective and durable treatment for type 2 diabetes in obese patients, enabling nearly all surgical patients to be free of insulin and many to be free of all diabetic medications three years after surgery. [More]
Enrollment commences for Daiichi Sankyo's ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study in NVAF patients

Enrollment commences for Daiichi Sankyo's ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study in NVAF patients

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited today announced that it has started enrolling patients into the ENSURE-AF multinational phase 3 study, which will evaluate the efficacy and safety of its investigational oral, once-daily direct factor Xa-inhibitor edoxaban compared to enoxaparin/warfarin for the prevention of stroke and other blood clot complications in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing electrical cardioversion (low-energy shocks to trigger normal heart rhythm). [More]
Amgen reports positive findings from AMG 145 Phase 3 studies in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Amgen reports positive findings from AMG 145 Phase 3 studies in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced new detailed data from three Phase 3 studies that showed treatment with its novel investigational cholesterol-lowering medication, evolocumab (AMG 145), resulted in a statistically significant reduction of 55-66 percent in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared to placebo in patients with high cholesterol. [More]
Genetic markers could help predict heart attack in patients with heart disease

Genetic markers could help predict heart attack in patients with heart disease

Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified a biological process that may help physicians predict when someone with heart disease is likely to have a heart attack in the near future. [More]

SEATTLE II study confirms safety and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute PE

EKOS Corporation, a BTG International group company, notes the presentation of the results of the SEATTLE II trial this afternoon at ACC.14, the 63rd Annual Scientific Session and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology in Washington, DC in the United States. [More]

Researchers quantify proportion of adults potentially affected by updated 2014 BP recommendations

Applying the updated 2014 blood pressure (BP) guideline to the U.S. population suggests that nearly 6 million adults are no longer classified as needing hypertension medication, and that an estimated 13.5 million adults would now be considered as having achieved goal blood pressure, primarily older adults, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]
Cheap drug holds promise of treating heart attack patients

Cheap drug holds promise of treating heart attack patients

​The initial results of this trial were published a few months ago (Circulation. 2013;128:1495-1503), and showed that patients who received this treatment during emergency transit to hospital had much smaller amounts of dead heart muscle than those randomly assigned to receive no treatment. [More]

MADIT-CRT study: Boston Scientific CRT defibrillator reduces risk of death in mild heart failure patients

In the longest follow-up to date of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) for mild heart failure patients, Boston Scientific Corporation's exclusively sponsored and landmark Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial – Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) study demonstrated significant and sustained survival benefit for the indicated population. [More]
Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

A new study is giving hope to older men who are concerned about the effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on their sexual health. [More]
Setting clocks ahead 1 hour may accelerate cardiac events in some, shows study

Setting clocks ahead 1 hour may accelerate cardiac events in some, shows study

Still feeling the residual effects of springing ahead for daylight saving time? The hour of sleep lost - or gained - may play a bigger, perhaps more dangerous role in our body's natural rhythm than we think. It seems moving the clock forward or backward may alter the timing of when heart attacks occur in the week following these time changes, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Aleglitazar drug does not reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

Use of the drug aleglitazar, which has shown the ability to lower glucose levels and have favorable effects on cholesterol, did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke among patients with type 2 diabetes and recent heart attack or unstable angina, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with presentation at the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]

Millions of US adults may no longer need blood pressure medication, study suggests

New guidelines that ease the recommended blood pressure could result in 5.8 million U.S. adults no longer needing hypertension medication, according to an analysis by Duke Medicine researchers. [More]

Study compares two types of heart valve technologies

Among patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using a catheter tube, a comparison of two types of heart valve technologies, balloon-expandable or self-expandable valve systems, found a greater rate of device success with the balloon-expandable valve, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with presentation at the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]

Study of astronauts show heart becomes more spherical when exposed to microgravity in space

New findings from a study of 12 astronauts show the heart becomes more spherical when exposed to long periods of microgravity in space, a change that could lead to cardiac problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]