Cardiology News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiology News and Research

Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The field is commonly divided in the branches of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology.
Three UCR STEM students named winners of Strauss Scholarship

Three UCR STEM students named winners of Strauss Scholarship

Undergraduates at the University of California, Riverside are on a success roll. First, two students won Goldwater Scholarships, announced last month. Now three undergraduate students have been named winners of prestigious scholarships from the Donald A. Strauss Foundation. Highly competitive, the Strauss Scholarship is a public service scholarship given to university students in California. [More]
Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

New research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association indicates that patients who are treated for hemorrhagic stroke at a comprehensive stroke center are more likely to receive specialized treatment, reducing the risk of mortality. [More]
1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable. [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]
The Valley Hospital receives A grade for patient safety in seven consecutive score reports

The Valley Hospital receives A grade for patient safety in seven consecutive score reports

For the seventh consecutive time, The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, has been recognized for its dedication to patient safety by being awarded an A grade in the Spring 2015 Hospital Safety Score, which rates how well hospitals protect patients from preventable medical errors, injuries and infections within the hospital. [More]
Study finds that gene therapy can clip out genetic material associated with heart failure

Study finds that gene therapy can clip out genetic material associated with heart failure

Gene therapy can clip out genetic material linked to heart failure and replace it with the normal gene in human cardiac cells, according to a study led by researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have shown for the first time that a gene previously implicated in blood vessel formation during embryonic development and tumor growth also induces immune suppression during tumor development. [More]
Emotion regulation deficits specific to bipolar I disorder

Emotion regulation deficits specific to bipolar I disorder

Emotion regulation deficits associated with bipolar I disorder may not extend to bipolar II disorder, say researchers. [More]
Bipolar disorder impacts life expectancy in the young

Bipolar disorder impacts life expectancy in the young

Research indicates that patients with bipolar disorder have a decreased life expectancy, with this being particularly pronounced in younger patients. [More]

Clinical features identified to distinguish bipolar I disorder from MDD

Researchers have identified seven clinical features that could help distinguish patients with bipolar disorder from those with major depressive disorder. [More]
Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamy increases the risk of heart disease by more than 4-fold, reveals research presented at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology Congress 2015 (APSC 2015) by Dr Amin Daoulah, a cardiologist at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The risk and severity of heart disease increased with the number of wives. [More]
Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Post-surgical hospital readmission after discharge and repeat emergency room (ER) visits are not unusual for patients who have undergone major thoracic surgery. Recognizing this problem, clinicians at McMaster University have implemented an innovative, active post-discharge intervention for thoracic surgery patients that is based on the principle of a "one team-one approach" that is initiated while the patient is still hospitalized. [More]
Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

A retrospective review of 633 adults and children who underwent bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) for congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2014 indicated that the risk of re-intervention was five times greater for children than adults, with the likelihood of re-intervention decreasing by 10% for each increasing year of age at surgery. [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Refining the results of a 2013 study, researchers have found that atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, is associated with only one type of heart attack - the more common of the two types. [More]
Study explores how NYC doctor can perform tele-robotic ultrasound over the Internet on patients in Chicago

Study explores how NYC doctor can perform tele-robotic ultrasound over the Internet on patients in Chicago

A new clinical trial is testing the feasibility and efficiency of a doctor in New York City remotely performing long-distance, tele-robotic ultrasound exams over the Internet on patients in Chicago. [More]
Record number of abstracts submitted to Heart Failure 2015

Record number of abstracts submitted to Heart Failure 2015

A record number of abstracts have been submitted to the world's leading heart failure congress, promising more original science than ever before. [More]
Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound settings can change beat frequency of cardiac cells

Ultrasound—the technology used for sonograms and examining the heart—can increase the rate at which heart cells beat, researchers from Drexel University report. [More]
Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

The European Investment Bank has provided a EUR 160 million loan to Getinge AB, a global medical technology company, for its research and development in the areas of surgery, intensive care, infection control, care ergonomics and wound care. Getinge’s research addresses unmet medical needs and targets the development of new devices with higher efficiency and safety for increased positive outcomes for both caregivers and patients. [More]
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