Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

New analysis finds global improvements in life expectancy

Global life expectancy increased by 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women between 1990 and 2013, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). [More]
Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. [More]
Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Self-reported moderate to vigorous exercise was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels in a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. [More]
Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Study: Low glycemic diet does not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors

Nutrition experts are continually debating the nutritional value of carbohydrate-containing foods and whether some are healthier than others. High carbohydrate foods are classified by how much they increase blood sugar; known as glycemic index. In new findings led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, researchers looked at glycemic index' effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes and found that low glycemic diets did not improve insulin sensitivity or cardiovascular risk factors. [More]
CVRx receives HDE approval for Barostim neo legacy device

CVRx receives HDE approval for Barostim neo legacy device

CVRx, Inc., a privately held medical device company, announced today that it has received Humanitarian Device Exemption (HDE) approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Barostim neo legacy device. [More]
ADIPOQ gene variations linked to colorectal cancer risk, new study reveals

ADIPOQ gene variations linked to colorectal cancer risk, new study reveals

Adiponectin, a collagen-like protein secreted by fat cells, derives from the ADIPOQ gene. Variations in this gene may increase risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and various cancers. A new study that links specific variations in the ADIPOQ gene to either higher or lower colorectal cancer risk is published in Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]
Study: Patients with operable kidney cancers more likely to have partial nephrectomy

Study: Patients with operable kidney cancers more likely to have partial nephrectomy

Patients with operable kidney cancers were more likely to have a partial nephrectomy -- the recommended treatment for localized tumors -- when treated in hospitals that were early adopters of robotic surgery, according to a new study. [More]
Penn researchers find effective way to inhibit inflammatory response during kidney dialysis

Penn researchers find effective way to inhibit inflammatory response during kidney dialysis

Frequent kidney dialysis is essential for the approximately 350,000 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in the United States. But it can also cause systemic inflammation, leading to complications such as cardiovascular disease and anemia, and patients who rely on the therapy have a five-year survival rate of only 35 percent. Such inflammation can be triggered when the complement cascade, part of the body's innate immune system, is inadvertently activated by modern polymer-based dialysis blood filters. [More]
Study suggests that hospitals perform more partial nephrectomies after acquiring robots

Study suggests that hospitals perform more partial nephrectomies after acquiring robots

Hospitals with robotic surgical systems are more likely to perform "nephron-sparing" partial nephrectomy--a recommended alternative to removal of the entire kidney--in patients with kidney cancer, reports a study in the December issue of Medical Care. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. [More]
Study finds link between hypoglycaemia and increased risk of cardiovascular events

Study finds link between hypoglycaemia and increased risk of cardiovascular events

A study involving scientists from the University of Leicester has established a link between hypoglycaemia and increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with diabetes. [More]
Research links increase in sudden cardiovascular death with consumption of cocaine

Research links increase in sudden cardiovascular death with consumption of cocaine

A joint piece of research conducted by the UPV/EHU, the Basque Institute of Forensic Medicine, and the Biomedical Research Centre Network into Mental Health of the Carlos III Institute of Health links, for the first time, the increase in sudden cardiovascular death with the recent consumption of cocaine. In people in the 19-49 age bracket this risk is quadrupled. [More]
CVRx gets CE Mark approval to expand labeling of Barostim neo System as MR Conditional

CVRx gets CE Mark approval to expand labeling of Barostim neo System as MR Conditional

CVRx, Inc., a privately held medical device company, announced today that CE Marking has been granted to expand labeling of the Barostim neo System as MR Conditional, or safe for use in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems under specified conditions. [More]
Smaller blood transfusions during surgeries better for patients with heart disease

Smaller blood transfusions during surgeries better for patients with heart disease

Patients with heart disease who receive transfusions during surgeries do just as well with smaller amounts of blood and face no greater risk of dying from other diseases than patients who received more blood, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

A new study led by a researcher at Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University looks at the metal cadmium and finds that higher human exposure can lead to significantly shorter telomeres, bits of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other diseases of old age. [More]
New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

New study reveals how COX-2 inhibitors can increase risk of heart attack in arthritis patients

A class of drug for treating arthritis - all but shelved over fears about side effects - may be given a new lease of life, following the discovery of a possible way to identify which patients should avoid using it. [More]
Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

A simple supplement could be a safe and cost-effective way of reducing heart disease in individuals born with a low birth weight, suggests research from the University of Cambridge. The study, carried out in rats, also raises the possibility of developing a blood test to indicate how much damage there is in the aortas of these individuals. [More]
Study: Long-term endurance training alters epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle

Study: Long-term endurance training alters epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that long-term endurance training in a stable way alters the epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle. The research team behind the study, which is being published in the journal Epigenetics, also found strong links between these altered epigenetic patterns and the activity in genes controlling improved metabolism and inflammation. [More]
Montreal Heart Institute surgeons develop free aortic surgery app

Montreal Heart Institute surgeons develop free aortic surgery app

Three cardiac surgeons from the Montreal Heart Institute, Dr. Yoan Lamarche, Dr. Ismail El-Hamamsy and Dr. Philippe Demers, are behind Aorta, a free app that provides specialists with patient-specific recommendations for aortic replacement surgery based on the latest scientific guidelines. [More]
McGill University scientists show how simple potato extract can fight obesity

McGill University scientists show how simple potato extract can fight obesity

Take a look in your pantry: the miracle ingredient for fighting obesity may already be there. A simple potato extract may limit weight gain from a diet that is high in fat and refined carbohydrates, according to scientists at McGill University. The results of their recent study were so surprising that the investigators repeated the experiment just to be sure. [More]