Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

There's a big debate right now in the migraine community around the underlying cause of the disease. The question is whether it is vascular, and has something to do with our vessels, or whether it has to do with our neurons not functioning correctly or misfiring. [More]
New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

It has become commonly accepted that women do worse than men following a heart attack or other coronary event. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life

High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life

About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients. [More]
SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

Scotland has a strong legacy as one of the pioneers of medical imaging. In the late 70s, Aberdeen University became the first institution to develop a full body MRI scanner; the system named the Mark I prototype was an enormous step forward for healthcare. [More]
Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

The Center for Global Health in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to honor Ernest Madu, MD, chairman and CEO of the Heart Institute of the Caribbean with its first annual Global Health Champion Award. [More]
Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Human pluripotent stem cells may revolutionize drug discovery in heart disease

Human pluripotent stem cells may revolutionize drug discovery in heart disease

Coaxing stem cells from patients to become heart cells may help clinicians personalize drug treatments and prevent heart-related toxicity. [More]
Improving muscle health could enhance response to insulin in Type 1 diabetes patients

Improving muscle health could enhance response to insulin in Type 1 diabetes patients

Loss of physical strength due to muscle deterioration is a complication for people living with Type 1 diabetes that's often overlooked. New research from McMaster University shows it shouldn't be. [More]
Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Medications prescribed to prevent heart attacks such as statins and aspirin are also associated with reduced heart attack severity, according to research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
Memory of heart attack can be stored in genes through epigenetic changes, study shows

Memory of heart attack can be stored in genes through epigenetic changes, study shows

Both heredity and environmental factors influence our risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study, by researches at Uppsala University, shows now that the memory of a heart attack can be stored in our genes through epigenetic changes. [More]
Fat stem cells can lower risk of diabetes in healthy obese individuals

Fat stem cells can lower risk of diabetes in healthy obese individuals

Obesity is responsible for the deaths of over three million people a year worldwide due to its associated diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. [More]
New model shows how globalization may create workplace stress leading to cardiovascular disease

New model shows how globalization may create workplace stress leading to cardiovascular disease

University of California, Irvine and SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers have created a model illustrating how economic globalization may create stressful employment factors in high-income countries contributing to the worldwide epidemic of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives

Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives

Intensive treatment to lower systolic (top number) blood pressure to below 120 would save more than 100,000 lives per year in the United States, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago researcher Holly Kramer, MD, MPH. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Study shows faith-based community program as effective method for heart health education

Study shows faith-based community program as effective method for heart health education

HeartSmarts, a faith-based community education and outreach program, is an effective method for teaching underserved communities about heart health in New York City, according to a study published in the Journal of Religion and Health. [More]
Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure

Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure

Three large, collaborating international consortia of researchers, including a team co-led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, have uncovered new genes and sites in the genome tied to elevated blood pressure, implicating certain biological pathways and pointing toward new therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension. [More]
Study provides insight into how weight-loss drug acts in the brain

Study provides insight into how weight-loss drug acts in the brain

A weight-loss drug dampened the response to food cues in regions of the brain associated with attention and emotion, leading to decreases in caloric intake, weight and body mass index (BMI), a team led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reported. [More]
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