Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
UAB will compete to help lead NIH research program to study health benefits of exercise

UAB will compete to help lead NIH research program to study health benefits of exercise

This summer, the NIH Common Fund announced a five-year, $170 million effort to reveal — in molecular terms — how exercise delivers its many benefits throughout the body. [More]
Novel approach to reduce 'bad' lipids in blood circulation

Novel approach to reduce 'bad' lipids in blood circulation

Xian-Cheng Jiang, PhD, professor of cell biology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study identifying a new approach for lowering "bad" lipids in blood circulation, a critical means to combat devastating cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The research was published in the online edition of Gastroenterology. [More]
Reducing SSB intake among children and adolescents associated with greater increase in HDL-C

Reducing SSB intake among children and adolescents associated with greater increase in HDL-C

In the first study to investigate blood lipid levels in association with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of Boston area schoolchildren, researchers found there was an inverse association between SSB intake changes and HDL-cholesterol increases (HDL-C is the "good cholesterol"). [More]
Bedwetting symptom may help identify OSA in post-menopausal women

Bedwetting symptom may help identify OSA in post-menopausal women

The results of a new study suggest that nocturnal enuresis, or bedwetting, may be an additional symptom that doctors can look for when assessing post-menopausal women for obstructive sleep apnea. That condition left untreated can lead to serious medical problems, such as cardiovascular disease, as organs are undersupplied with oxygen. [More]
Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital's Richard G. Cartledge, MD, FACS, has begun performing ultra-minimally invasive left atrial appendage ligation for atrial fibrillation patients who are on anticoagulants such as Coumadin, Xarelto or Effient. Dr. Cartledge, who is Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Hospital, is one of a select group of surgeons nationally using this method, which involves making two microscopic incisions in order to seal off the left atrial appendage (LAA) in patients where anticoagulants are contraindicated or who refuse to be on such medications. [More]
Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence has stayed the same but the proportion with no intention of quitting has risen in the last seven years, according to results from the latest EUROASPIRE surveys presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015 by Professor Kornelia Kotseva, chair of the EUROASPIRE Steering Committee and senior clinical research fellow at Imperial College London, UK. [More]
Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications has increased over the past ten years in ischaemic heart disease but levels are still suboptimal, according to the first results of the Chronic Ischaemic Cardiovascular Disease (CICD) Pilot Registry presented today at ESC Congress 2015 and published in European Heart Journal. [More]
CPAP treatment restores brain stem function, reverses health changes linked to heart disease

CPAP treatment restores brain stem function, reverses health changes linked to heart disease

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines are a commonly prescribed treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which muscles in the airways collapse during sleep, blocking breathing. [More]
European cardiomyopathies registry shows higher than expected use of defibrillators, genetic testing

European cardiomyopathies registry shows higher than expected use of defibrillators, genetic testing

The most representative snapshot of real world practice in cardiomyopathies in Europe has shown a higher than expected use of defibrillators and genetic testing. The baseline results of the ESC's EORP Cardiomyopathy Registry Pilot are presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015. [More]
Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Your heart may be older than you are – and that's not good. According to a new CDC Vital Signs report, 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have a predicted heart age that is older than their actual age. This means they are at higher risk for heart attacks and stroke. [More]
Familial hypercholesterolemia patients can benefit from alirocumab drug

Familial hypercholesterolemia patients can benefit from alirocumab drug

Alirocumab lowers cholesterol in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia to levels unreachable with statins alone, according to results from four ODYSSEY trials presented at ESC Congress today. [More]
Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer

Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer

Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors and whose disease is carefully monitored by urologists are unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer or die of their cancers, according to results of a study by researchers at the Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins, who analyzed survival statistics up to 15 years. [More]
SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

Last summer, SLU scientists made a breakthrough discovery about the way in which blood clots. Through X-ray crystallography, they solved the molecular structure of prothrombin, an important blood-clotting protein, revealing an unexpected, flexible role for a "linker" region that may be the key to developing better life-saving drugs. [More]
Abbott reports positive results of ABSORB Japan study comparing efficacy of fully dissolving heart stent to XIENCE

Abbott reports positive results of ABSORB Japan study comparing efficacy of fully dissolving heart stent to XIENCE

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) announced today positive one-year clinical results from ABSORB Japan, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Abbott's fully dissolving Absorb™ heart stent to XIENCE ®, Abbott's market-leading, permanent drug eluting stent. [More]
Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

The inner-city neighbourhood in which someone lives may affect his or her risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease, a new research paper suggests. [More]
Carbonated beverage consumption associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin

Carbonated beverage consumption associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin

Carbonated beverages are associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin, according to results from the All-Japan Utstein Registry presented for the first time today at ESC Congress. [More]
After acute myocardial infarction, respiratory infection associated with increased risk of mortality

After acute myocardial infarction, respiratory infection associated with increased risk of mortality

Respiratory infection is associated with a four-fold increased risk of in-hospital cardiovascular mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Catarina Quina-Rodrigues, a cardiologist at Hospital de Braga in Portugal. The findings highlight the importance of diagnostic alertness for respiratory infections in AMI patients so that therapeutic measures can be promptly taken. [More]
Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix Corp. is pleased to announce that Dr. Norman Wong, chief scientific officer of Resverlogix Corp. presented new data at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2015 in a poster presentation titled: "RVX-208, an orally active BET inhibitor, lowers CVD risk by activities beyond raising ApoA-I/HDL." [More]
Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US. [More]
LCZ696 reduces aortic systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure in hypertensive patients

LCZ696 reduces aortic systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure in hypertensive patients

The combination drug valsartan/sacubitril known as LCZ696 significantly reduced aortic systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure compared to the standard angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan in patients with hypertension, according to results of the PARAMETER study. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement