Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Southern Society bestows 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award to Stansfield

Dr. Brian K. Stansfield, neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Georgia and a 2004 graduate of the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, has received the 2016 Clinical Science Young Investigator Award from the Southern Society for Pediatric Research. [More]
Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. [More]
Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Women less likely to stick to cardiac rehabilitation program than men, study finds

Women less likely to stick to cardiac rehabilitation program than men, study finds

Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of disability globally. Participation in cardiac rehabilitation programs is associated with significantly lower death, but evidence suggests that women are significantly less likely to stick to a cardiac rehabilitation program than men, according to investigators writing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. [More]
New research suggests fasting not required before cholesterol, triglyceride measurement

New research suggests fasting not required before cholesterol, triglyceride measurement

New research from Denmark, Canada and the US involving more than 300,000 individuals suggests that patients do not need to check their cholesterol levels on an empty stomach. So far fasting has been required before cholesterol and triglyceride measurement in all countries except Denmark, where non-fasting blood sampling has been used since 2009. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D in black teens correlates with low activity of a major mechanism for controlling gene expression that may increase their risk of cancer and other disease, researchers report. [More]
Transforming MR images into body composition measurements: an interview with Olof Leinhard

Transforming MR images into body composition measurements: an interview with Olof Leinhard

Today's medical science utilizes relatively simple anthropometric measures that describe the body, such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. All of these measures are approximations of the body with the intention to characterize what's inside reflecting underlying phenomena that underpin the risk for different diseases. [More]
New dietary supplement may offer hope to combat heart disease

New dietary supplement may offer hope to combat heart disease

Combining marine fish oil, cocoa extract and phytosterols into a dietary supplement could offer new hope in the fight against heart disease, a new study suggests. [More]
Fructose common in western diet can damage brain genes

Fructose common in western diet can damage brain genes

A range of diseases -- from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer's disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are linked to changes to genes in the brain. A new study by UCLA life scientists has found that hundreds of those genes can be damaged by fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, in a way that could lead to those diseases. [More]
Sleep loss influences cholesterol metabolism, study finds

Sleep loss influences cholesterol metabolism, study finds

Lack of sleep has previously been found to impact the activation of the immune system, inflammation, carbohydrate metabolism and the hormones that regulate appetite. Now University of Helsinki researchers have found that sleep loss also influences cholesterol metabolism. [More]
Assessing body composition may help predict cardiovascular and total mortality

Assessing body composition may help predict cardiovascular and total mortality

Researchers from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA found that cardiovascular disease patients who have high muscle mass and low fat mass have a lower mortality risk than those with other body compositions. The findings also suggest that regardless of a person's level of fat mass, a higher level of muscle mass helps reduce the risk of death. [More]
Scientists identify critical biological factor for transforming adult somatic cells into stem cells

Scientists identify critical biological factor for transforming adult somatic cells into stem cells

In a new Cell Reports paper, a team led by John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D., of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, has identified and characterized a biological factor critical to the transformation of adult somatic cells (cells that are not sperm or egg cells) into stem cells. [More]
Researchers use highly accurate biomarker to measure aging in HIV infected patients

Researchers use highly accurate biomarker to measure aging in HIV infected patients

Thanks to combination antiretroviral therapies, many people with HIV can expect to live decades after being infected. Yet doctors have observed these patients often show signs of premature aging. [More]
More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

More cautious blood pressure-lowering strategy may be reasonable for elderly CKD patients

New research indicates that higher systolic blood pressure is linked with poor outcomes in patients with kidney disease, although the association diminishes with advanced age. The findings, which come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), provide valuable information concerning patients who are often excluded from blood pressure-lowering clinical trials. [More]
High fructose consumption during pregnancy may increase risk factors for heart disease in children

High fructose consumption during pregnancy may increase risk factors for heart disease in children

The negative health effects of consuming large amounts of fructose could impact several generations, according to researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. [More]
Strength training lowers odds of death in older adults

Strength training lowers odds of death in older adults

Older adults who met twice-weekly strength training guidelines had lower odds of dying in a new analysis by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Columbia University. The study is the first to demonstrate the association in a large, nationally representative sample over an extended time period, particularly in an older population. [More]
Cyclodextrin offers potential new therapy for cardiovascular disease

Cyclodextrin offers potential new therapy for cardiovascular disease

An American mother's hunch might result in new treatments for patients who can't tolerate conventional cholesterol-lowering drugs. [More]
High dietary saturated fat intake may lead to prostate cancer aggressiveness

High dietary saturated fat intake may lead to prostate cancer aggressiveness

Eating a diet higher in saturated fat, a type of fat found commonly in foods such as fatty beef and cheese, was linked to more aggressive prostate cancer, a study by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and collaborators has found. The preliminary results were presented Monday, April 18 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

Specific intake levels of xanthohumol reduces obesity, cholesterol and elevated glucose

A recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, that significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain. [More]
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