Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
New Iowa State study shows that people with gym membership exercise more

New Iowa State study shows that people with gym membership exercise more

If your New Year's resolution was to exercise more in 2017, chances are you've already given up or you're on the verge of doing so. To reach your goal, you may want to consider joining a gym, based on the results of a new study from a team of Iowa State University researchers. [More]
Study identifies early signs of heart changes for women with preeclampsia

Study identifies early signs of heart changes for women with preeclampsia

In a study to be presented Friday, Jan. 27, in the oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers with the Maternal and Child Health Research Center and the Department of Cardiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, will present findings of a study titled Cardiac Dysfunction in Preeclampsia is Present at Diagnosis and Persists Postpartum. [More]
Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal poses serious and unrecognized health risk

Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal poses serious and unrecognized health risk

Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal in countries around the world poses a serious and previously unrecognized health risk to millions of people according to a new study. [More]
Study provides scientific insight into metastatic patterns of EGFR mutated NSCLCs

Study provides scientific insight into metastatic patterns of EGFR mutated NSCLCs

The discovery of several different subtypes of Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), the most frequent form of lung cancer, has been a major breakthrough in the fight against the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. [More]
Study provides link between common mutations in blood cells of older adults and atherosclerosis

Study provides link between common mutations in blood cells of older adults and atherosclerosis

A new study provides some of the first links between relatively common mutations in the blood cells of elderly humans and atherosclerosis. [More]
UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists have turned to amphibian sources -- specifically frogs and tadpoles -- to help shed light on how early stressors in the womb and shortly after birth may play a part in the onset of adult diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Statins could reduce threat of venous thromboembolism, research shows

Statins could reduce threat of venous thromboembolism, research shows

Statins could hold the key to eradicating one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths after researchers uncovered a new role for the cholesterol-lowering pill. [More]
Scientists identify 'molecular barcode' in blood samples that can predict survival of Ebola patients

Scientists identify 'molecular barcode' in blood samples that can predict survival of Ebola patients

Scientists have identified a 'molecular barcode' in the blood of patients with Ebola virus disease that can predict whether they are likely to survive or die from the viral infection. [More]
Disadvantaged women more likely to suffer heart attack than men, new study finds

Disadvantaged women more likely to suffer heart attack than men, new study finds

Women from low socioeconomic backgrounds are 25 per cent more likely to suffer a heart attack than disadvantaged men, a major new study has found. [More]
Sedentary lifestyle may hasten biological aging

Sedentary lifestyle may hasten biological aging

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary. [More]
UIC chemists pinpoint role of cholesterol in cells

UIC chemists pinpoint role of cholesterol in cells

Scientists have long puzzled over cholesterol. It's biologically necessary; it's observably harmful - and nobody knows what it's doing where it's most abundant in cells: in the cell membrane. [More]
Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Obesity has been linked to "letter" changes at many different sites in the genome, yet these differences do not fully explain the variation in people's body mass index (BMI) or why some overweight people develop health complications while others don't. [More]
New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

New report highlights trends in heart disease care in the U.S.

Over 93 percent of heart attack patients are receiving stents within the guideline-recommended threshold of 90 minutes after arriving at the hospital, with the median time to stenting only 59 minutes, according to a broad report on trends in heart disease care from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Calorie restriction helps rhesus monkeys lead longer and healthier lives, report shows

Calorie restriction helps rhesus monkeys lead longer and healthier lives, report shows

Settling a persistent scientific controversy, a long-awaited report shows that restricting calories does indeed help rhesus monkeys live longer, healthier lives. [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Chemotherapy-induced senescent cells promote side effects and cancer relapse

Standard chemotherapy is a blunt force instrument against cancer - and it's a rare cancer patient who escapes debilitating side effects from systemic treatments that mostly affect dividing cells, both malignant and healthy, throughout the body. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator improves survival rate in older patients, study finds

Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years--a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Tobacco control policies can provide economic and public health benefits, report reveals

Policies to control tobacco use, including tobacco tax and price increases, can generate significant government revenues for health and development work, according to a new landmark global report from the World Health Organization and the National Cancer Institute of the United States of America. [More]
Workplace-based sleep health program can reduce injuries and disability in firefighters

Workplace-based sleep health program can reduce injuries and disability in firefighters

Many firefighters suffer acute and chronic sleep deficiency and misalignment of their circadian rhythm (body clock) due to extended shifts and long work weeks. [More]
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