Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Cardiovascular Research Foundation to co-sponsor 2014 VEINS conference

Cardiovascular Research Foundation to co-sponsor 2014 VEINS conference

VEINS is an established Venous Endovascular Interventional Strategies group comprised of experts in the field whose primary aim is to provide a "How To" meeting for cardiologists and other healthcare providers who are interested in advancing their knowledge and skills in venous interventions and whose ultimate goal is developing their own comprehensive venous interventional program. [More]
Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

A new study involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and other institutions says patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes should eat a diet low in carbohydrates. [More]
Researchers receive inaugural funding from AHA to prevent heart disease and stroke

Researchers receive inaugural funding from AHA to prevent heart disease and stroke

Researchers and clinicians at UT Southwestern Medical Center are among a small, select group at U.S. universities to receive inaugural funding from the American Heart Association (AHA) for work that takes aim at heart disease and stroke. [More]
Researchers find that considerable proportion of infections is discovered outside hospital setting

Researchers find that considerable proportion of infections is discovered outside hospital setting

More than 80 percent of hospitalized patients who tested positive for Clostridium difficile were tested outside the hospital or within the first 72 hours of hospitalization, suggesting that settings outside of the hospital may play key roles in the identification, onset and possible transmission of the disease, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

A new study supports a growing body of research suggesting a safe and effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with fewer detrimental side effects and improved health profile than with standard anti-hormone therapies. [More]
Age of sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes in girls

Age of sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes in girls

The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature. [More]
New strategies to help overcome hairstyle-related barriers to physical activity

New strategies to help overcome hairstyle-related barriers to physical activity

According to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately four out of five black women are overweight or obese and 36 percent meet physical activity objectives as determined by the CDC. [More]
Majority of Canadian women lack knowledge of heart disease symptoms and risk factors

Majority of Canadian women lack knowledge of heart disease symptoms and risk factors

A new survey, ordered by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, shows that a majority of Canadian women lack knowledge of heart disease symptoms and risk factors, and that a significant proportion is even unaware of their own risk status. [More]
Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. [More]
Common genetic variation in gene may modify cardiovascular benefit of aspirin

Common genetic variation in gene may modify cardiovascular benefit of aspirin

Aspirin is the gold standard for antiplatelet therapy and a daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. [More]
13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

13 researchers awarded National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. The fellowships aim to increase the number of scientists studying and treating psoriatic disease by encouraging promising doctors to dedicate their careers to the study of psoriasis as physician researchers. [More]
Eating lean beef can reduce risk factors for heart disease

Eating lean beef can reduce risk factors for heart disease

Contrary to conventional wisdom, a growing body of evidence shows that eating lean beef can reduce risk factors for heart disease, according to recent research by nutritional scientists. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

The Annals of Family Medicine today published an article detailing research showing that women with a history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later in adulthood than other women, work completed by physicians in the Center for Primary Care and Prevention (CPCP) at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island. [More]
Thirteen scientists receive grant to identify new treatments, cure for psoriasis

Thirteen scientists receive grant to identify new treatments, cure for psoriasis

Thirteen scientists received a total of $1.05 million in funding from the National Psoriasis Foundation for projects that aim to identify new treatments and a cure for psoriasis—an autoimmune disease that appears on the skin, affecting 7.5 million Americans—and psoriatic arthritis—an inflammatory arthritis that affects the joints and tendons, occurring in up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis. [More]
Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai Heart at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been awarded a $3.8 million grant by the American Heart Association to promote cardiovascular health among high-risk New York City children, and their parents, living in Harlem and the Bronx. With assistance from the NYC Administration for Children's Services, the research team's mission is to reduce each child's future risk of obesity, heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of the adverse health effects of too much sitting, according to a new study by researchers from the American Cancer Society, The Cooper Institute, and the University of Texas. [More]
Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

Women experiencing stressful events the day before eating high-fat meal can slow body's metabolism

A new study in women suggests that experiencing one or more stressful events the day before eating a single high-fat meal can slow the body's metabolism, potentially contributing to weight gain. [More]
Use of electronic health records simplifies clinical trials

Use of electronic health records simplifies clinical trials

Using electronic health records to understand the best available treatment for patients, from a range of possible options, is more efficient and less costly for taxpayers than the existing clinical trial process, a new study shows. [More]
Charles H. Hennekens wins prestigious Alton Ochnser Award

Charles H. Hennekens wins prestigious Alton Ochnser Award

The Ochnser Clinic Foundation recently announced that the 29th annual recipient of the prestigious Alton Ochnser Award is Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., the first Sir Richard Doll professor and senior academic advisor to the dean in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University. [More]