Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Study: Cardiorespiratory fitness associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers

Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with reduced metabolic syndrome risk among smokers, according to researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. [More]
Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Robert B. Kiningham receives Founders' Award at 2015 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Robert B. Kiningham receives Founders' Award at 2015 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Robert B. Kiningham, MD, was awarded the Founders' Award at the 24th American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting in Hollywood, Fla. The award is bestowed when AMSSM leadership determines that a member exemplifies the best that a sports medicine physician can be and do. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
Non-vigorous walking may help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects

Non-vigorous walking may help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects

Walking at an easy pace for about three hours every week may be just enough physical activity to help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects of their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Pivotal enters into sales, distribution agreement for BeneFishial family of products

Pivotal enters into sales, distribution agreement for BeneFishial family of products

Pivotal Therapeutics Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus on Omega-3 therapies for cardiovascular disease and overall health, announced today that it has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with Korea Animal Medical Science Institute and its newly created affiliate for the exclusive sales and distribution of the BeneFishial family of products. [More]
Cardio3 BioSciences announces first patient enrollment in NKG2D CAR T-Cell Phase I clinical trial

Cardio3 BioSciences announces first patient enrollment in NKG2D CAR T-Cell Phase I clinical trial

Cardio3 BioSciences (C3BS), a leader in engineered cell-therapy treatments with clinical programs initially targeting indications in cardiovascular disease and oncology, today announced the enrollment of the first patient in a Phase I clinical trial evaluating the Company’s lead CAR T-Cell therapy, NKG2D CAR T-Cell, in blood cancer patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or multiple myeloma (MM). [More]
Duke-NUS study shows association between eating out and high blood pressure

Duke-NUS study shows association between eating out and high blood pressure

A recent study on university-going young adults, by researchers from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, is the first ever to show an association between meals eaten away from home and high blood pressure. [More]
USPTO issues Cardio3 BioSciences Notice of Allowance for patent covering CAR-expressing TCR-deficient T-Cells

USPTO issues Cardio3 BioSciences Notice of Allowance for patent covering CAR-expressing TCR-deficient T-Cells

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in engineered cell therapies with clinical programs initially targeting indications in cardiovascular disease and oncology, today announced that it has received a Notice of Allowance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for a significant patent application covering T-Cell receptor-deficient T-Cells which are engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor. [More]
UGR-led scientists defend the role of PE teachers as point of entry to public health system

UGR-led scientists defend the role of PE teachers as point of entry to public health system

An international team of scientists led by the University of Granada has defended the role of physical education (PE) teachers in secondary schools as the point of entry to the public health system. [More]
American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

The American Oil Chemists' Society has honored University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist Yeonhwa Park with the Timothy L. Mounts Award for her "significant and important contributions in the area of bioactive lipids and their impact on health conditions such as obesity, osteoporosis, arthritis and cardiovascular disease." [More]
CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

The CVS Health Foundation, a private foundation created by CVS Health Corporation (NYSE: CVS), today announced 55 new grant recipients as part of its multi-year, $5 million commitment to increase access to health care in communities nationwide. [More]
Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

As the global population pushes past 7 billion and more people reach old age, the number of deaths from cardiovascular diseases is on the rise. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of premature death in the world, include heart attacks, strokes, and other circulatory diseases. [More]
New resource available to help older Chinese Americans better understand their healthcare needs

New resource available to help older Chinese Americans better understand their healthcare needs

On the eve of National Minority Health Month, which helps raise awareness for disparities in health and care among minorities in the U.S., a new resource is available to help one such group, older Chinese Americans, better understand and drive their own well-being. [More]
Study calls for more intensive psychotherapeutic support for patients with alcohol addiction

Study calls for more intensive psychotherapeutic support for patients with alcohol addiction

The mortality of alcohol dependent patients in general hospitals is many times higher than that of patients without alcohol dependency. [More]
ImmunoClin receives controlled drug license to supply, produce schedule 1 drugs in UK

ImmunoClin receives controlled drug license to supply, produce schedule 1 drugs in UK

ImmunoClin Corporation, a healthcare company specialized in personalized medicine, announces that its wholly owned subsidiary, ImmunoClin Ltd., received a controlled drug license from the UK government to possess, supply and produce schedule 1 drugs in its UK laboratory. [More]
Treating common gum disease in CKD patients could reduce heart disease risk

Treating common gum disease in CKD patients could reduce heart disease risk

Treating a common gum condition in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients could significantly reduce their risk of potentially fatal heart disease, Aston University researchers say. [More]
CVD risk assessment still important in severely obese adolescents

CVD risk assessment still important in severely obese adolescents

Researchers report a dose–response relationship between body mass index and cardiovascular risk even in severely obese adolescents, making its assessment important to limit further disease progression. [More]
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