Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
New UTMB study finds no association between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins

New UTMB study finds no association between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston of more than 30,000 commercially insured men is the first large comparative analysis to show that there is no link between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins. The study found that middle-aged and older men who receive testosterone therapy are not at increased risk of this illness. [More]
Study show that putting tax on sugary drinks could help reduce prevalence of obesity in the UK

Study show that putting tax on sugary drinks could help reduce prevalence of obesity in the UK

In today's report, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition says no more than five per cent of daily calories should come from added sugar - about seven level teaspoons. The British Medical Association has called a 20 per cent tax on sugar because, according to its figures, poor diets are causing around 70,000 premature deaths each year. [More]
Resveratrol and quercetin may improve efficacy of existing chemotherapeutic cancer drug

Resveratrol and quercetin may improve efficacy of existing chemotherapeutic cancer drug

Resveratrol and quercetin, two polyphenols that have been widely studied for their health properties, may soon become the basis of an important new advance in cancer treatment, primarily by improving the efficacy and potential use of an existing chemotherapeutic cancer drug. [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

New review article explains link between PTSD and increased cardiovascular disease risk

A growing number of patient studies show that people who suffered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and heart attack. A new review article in American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology examines the recent scientific literature to explain how the two are linked. [More]
Study examines accuracy, cost-effectiveness of new cholesterol guidelines in identifying increased CVD risk

Study examines accuracy, cost-effectiveness of new cholesterol guidelines in identifying increased CVD risk

An examination of the 2013 guidelines for determining statin eligibility, compared to guidelines from 2004, indicates that they are associated with greater accuracy and efficiency in identifying increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and presence of subclinical coronary artery disease, particularly in individuals at intermediate risk, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
New Healthy Beverage Index may help consumers to make diligent decisions about daily drinking habits

New Healthy Beverage Index may help consumers to make diligent decisions about daily drinking habits

There may be a better way to think about daily drinking habits that impact health conditions such as obesity and diabetes, according to a new study by Virginia Tech researchers. [More]
Wayne State researchers explore effects of Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil in ESRD patients

Wayne State researchers explore effects of Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil in ESRD patients

End-stage renal disease (ERSD) is the last stage of chronic kidney disease where the kidneys function at under 10 to 15 percent of their normal capacity. At this stage, kidneys cannot effectively remove waste or excess fluid from the blood system, and dialysis or a kidney transplant is necessary to live. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Middle classes from developing countries more vulnerable to develop diabetes due ancestral diets

Middle classes from developing countries more vulnerable to develop diabetes due ancestral diets

The middle classes from developing countries are more susceptible than western Caucasians to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in today's changing environment. New research published today in Cell Metabolism from the University of Sydney in Australia, the National Centre for Cell Science and the DYP Medical College in Pune, India reveals this may be a result of the nutrition endured by their ancestors. [More]
BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

Childhood high blood pressure (HBP) is a serious public health challenge worldwide due to associated increases in risk of end organ damages and correlation with HBP in adulthood. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) has been reported to increase significantly among United States children and adolescents from 1988-1994 to 1999-2008, but little is known about recent trends in BP values and elevated BP. [More]
Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

A study to examine recessively inherited genome-wide DNA sequences has for the first time discovered a potential link with Britain's biggest killer - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). [More]
Lack of education linked to more number of deaths

Lack of education linked to more number of deaths

A new study by researchers at the University of Colorado, New York University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill estimates the number of deaths that can be linked to differences in education, and finds that variation in the risk of death across education levels has widened considerably. [More]
Risk of hepatobiliary cancer, cardiovascular diseases later in life is higher in women with ICP

Risk of hepatobiliary cancer, cardiovascular diseases later in life is higher in women with ICP

In a new study of more than 125,000 pregnant women in Sweden, researchers found that the risk of hepatobiliary cancer and immune-mediated and cardiovascular diseases later in life is higher in women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) than in women without this condition. [More]
New study finds that secondhand smoke increases risk of stroke for nonsmokers

New study finds that secondhand smoke increases risk of stroke for nonsmokers

Nearly 800,000 people in the U.S. suffer a stroke each year. Stroke is responsible for one out of every 19 deaths in the U.S. and it is a leading cause of disability. A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that secondhand smoke (SHS) increases the risk of stroke by about 30 percent for nonsmokers. [More]
Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of Praluent injection meets primary endpoint

Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of Praluent injection meets primary endpoint

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of the investigational therapy Praluent® (alirocumab) Injection met its primary endpoint. [More]
Resverlogix and Hepalink close license agreement, sign definitive stock purchase agreement

Resverlogix and Hepalink close license agreement, sign definitive stock purchase agreement

Resverlogix Corp. announced today that it has closed a license agreement and formally entered into a definitive stock purchase agreement with Shenzhen Hepalink Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.. [More]
Evidence-based initiative aims to prevent avoidable hospital readmissions

Evidence-based initiative aims to prevent avoidable hospital readmissions

A statewide effort led by key stakeholders in South Carolina successfully organized and implemented an evidence-based initiative aimed at improving the quality of healthcare transitions after hospital discharge to prevent avoidable readmissions. [More]
News study shows pregnancy complications tied to future cardiovascular disease risk

News study shows pregnancy complications tied to future cardiovascular disease risk

According to a new study, women can accurately recall key pregnancy-related information at least 4 years later that could have important implications for their future risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). [More]
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