Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive blood pressure lowering therapies can cut heart disease risk in older adults

Intensive therapies to reduce high blood pressure can cut the risk of heart disease in older adults without increasing the risk for falls, according to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Older, frail hypertensive adults could benefit from intensive lowering of blood pressure

Older, frail hypertensive adults could benefit from intensive lowering of blood pressure

Adults with hypertension who are age 75 years and older, including those who are frail and with poor overall health, could benefit from lowering their blood pressure below current medical guidelines. [More]
ITM researchers develop small, user-friendly device for real time detection of arrhythmias

ITM researchers develop small, user-friendly device for real time detection of arrhythmias

Researchers at the Technological Institute of Morelia in Mexico, created a device for detecting cardiac arrhythmias in real time, and that turns portable a system that uses electrodes placed on the chest of the patient or as part of clothing (shirt), plus it allows to alert the physician at the same time there is an irregularity in the heartbeat. [More]
Raised lipoprotein(a) could account for a quarter of FH cases

Raised lipoprotein(a) could account for a quarter of FH cases

High levels of lipoprotein(a) could account for a substantial proportion of cases of familial hypercholesterolaemia, a large study shows. [More]
Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Consuming high amounts of saturated fat or low amounts of mono- and polyunsaturated fats as an adolescent was associated with higher breast density in young adulthood. Breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer. [More]
Call for improvements in CVD risk models

Call for improvements in CVD risk models

There are too many poorly validated models for predicting cardiovascular disease risk in the general population, researchers report in The BMJ. [More]
High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could increase vascular dementia risk

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

New Research: High blood pressure raises risk of dementia

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health. [More]
World Hypertension Day: AMA joins hands with AHA to increase public awareness of hypertension

World Hypertension Day: AMA joins hands with AHA to increase public awareness of hypertension

With the number of deaths caused by high blood pressure on the rise in the United States, the American Medical Association is joining the American Heart Association to increase public awareness of this “silent killer.” [More]
Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Overnight extubations in ICU patients linked to higher mortality

Adult patients who were admitted to U.S. intensive care units had higher mortality if they were extubated overnight. The results reported at the ATS 2016 International Conference may discourage hospital administrators from expanding the practice of overnight extubations in ICUs, which the lead author noted are rapidly being transformed to provide continuity of care. [More]
Model may guide statin treatment in diabetes patients

Model may guide statin treatment in diabetes patients

Researchers have developed a model to predict the benefits of statin treatment in individual patients with Type 2 diabetes, but experts question whether individualised treatment is always the best choice. [More]
McGill researchers discover role of folliculin protein in regulating activity of fat cells

McGill researchers discover role of folliculin protein in regulating activity of fat cells

Researchers have uncovered a new molecular pathway for stimulating the body to burn fat - a discovery that could help fight obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Philips to showcase advanced cardiology solutions at EuroPCR 2016 Congress

Philips to showcase advanced cardiology solutions at EuroPCR 2016 Congress

Royal Philips today announced its participation in the EuroPCR 2016 Congress in the field of interventional cardiology, taking place in Paris, France, May 17 – 20, 2016. [More]
Altered coagulation caused by HIV virus linked to increased risk of non-AIDS diseases

Altered coagulation caused by HIV virus linked to increased risk of non-AIDS diseases

With more than 36.9 million people infected globally, HIV continues to be a major public health issue. Those living with the virus are at an increased risk for other non-AIDS diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, and though it's not entirely clear why, this has been associated with inflammation and abnormal blood clotting. [More]
Arterial switch to 12 o'clock position linked to myocardial ischaemia risk in adolescence

Arterial switch to 12 o'clock position linked to myocardial ischaemia risk in adolescence

Arterial switch to the 12 o'clock position is associated with abnormal coronary perfusion in adolescence, reveals research presented today at EuroCMR 2016.1 Babies born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) undergo the arterial switch operation in the first days of life. [More]
Myocardial fibrosis linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes in OSA patients

Myocardial fibrosis linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes in OSA patients

Myocardial fibrosis could be a future therapeutic target after researchers found it correlated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) referred for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). [More]
New CMR imaging technique increases accuracy by eliminating patients' need to breathe naturally

New CMR imaging technique increases accuracy by eliminating patients' need to breathe naturally

A new technique for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging improves accuracy by removing patients' need to breathe, reveals research presented today at EuroCMR 2016 by Professor Juerg Schwitter, director of the Cardiac MR Centre at the University Hospital Lausanne, Switzerland. [More]
New IVPA catheter design helps imaging system to reveal deeper details of fatty arteries

New IVPA catheter design helps imaging system to reveal deeper details of fatty arteries

As plaque accumulates on the inside of arteries, it can cause the arteries to thicken and harden. When that plaque ruptures, it can ultimately block blood flow and lead to a heart attack, stroke or other problem throughout the body. [More]
Easy-to-follow care pathway assists health professionals with latest post-reproductive health strategies

Easy-to-follow care pathway assists health professionals with latest post-reproductive health strategies

A new position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society published in the journal Maturitas provides a pathway with the latest post-reproductive health strategies, with the aim of optimizing care at an international scale. [More]
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