Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Cardiac device wearers ought to keep safe distance from smartphones to prevent unwanted painful shocks

Cardiac device wearers ought to keep safe distance from smartphones to prevent unwanted painful shocks

Cardiac device wearers should keep a safe distance from smartphones to avoid unwanted painful shocks or pauses in function, reveals research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE -- CARDIOSTIM 2015 by Dr. Carsten Lennerz, first author and cardiology resident in the Clinic for Heart and Circulatory Diseases, German Heart Centre, Munich, Germany. [More]
New study predicts outcomes of CV patients using polypill intervention

New study predicts outcomes of CV patients using polypill intervention

A new study published in the journal BMJ Open (May 2015) has demonstrated that the improved treatment adherence achievable using a fixed-dose combination polypill (atorvastatin, ramipril and low-dose aspirin) to prevent recurring myocardial infarction, can avoid up to 15% more fatal and non-fatal CV events, conferring potential savings to healthcare systems. [More]
AstraZeneca, Inserm to investigate new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes, CKD

AstraZeneca, Inserm to investigate new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes, CKD

AstraZeneca today announced a three-year research collaboration with the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) to investigate new therapeutic approaches totype 2 diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease. [More]
University of Michigan, AstraZeneca team up to identify novel targets for chronic kidney disease

University of Michigan, AstraZeneca team up to identify novel targets for chronic kidney disease

AstraZeneca today announced a two-year research collaboration with the University of Michigan to advance the treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) through the improved understanding of the disease. The collaboration will tackle the challenging area of identifying novel targets for the treatment of CKD, focusing on the use ofpatient tissue and validation of preclinical models. [More]
Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

A recent study presented at the American College of Cardiology 64th Annual Scientific Meeting evaluated the impact of an age, sex, and gene expression score on clinical decision-making and the rate of further cardiac evaluation in symptomatic female patients suggestive of CAD in the outpatient setting. [More]
DCRI announces new study to better understand lipid management

DCRI announces new study to better understand lipid management

At a time when lipid management in the United States is undergoing transition in response to new guideline recommendations and expanding lipid-lowering therapy options, the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) today announced a new study to better understand contemporary lipid management as well as the beliefs and attitudes of patient and providers regarding cholesterol, cardiovascular risk assessment, and options for lipid treatments. [More]
Improving air quality could prevent pollution-related deaths worldwide

Improving air quality could prevent pollution-related deaths worldwide

Improving air quality -- in clean and dirty places -- could reduce pollution-related deaths worldwide by millions of people each year. That finding comes from a team of environmental engineering and public health researchers who developed a global model of how changes in outdoor air pollution could lead to changes in the rates of health problems such as heart attack, stroke and lung cancer. [More]
Poor sleep quality increases heart disease and stroke risks

Poor sleep quality increases heart disease and stroke risks

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]
ABC TV's science program impacts use of statins among Australians

ABC TV's science program impacts use of statins among Australians

More than 60,000 Australians are estimated to have reduced or discontinued their use of prescribed cholesterol-lowering statin medications following the airing of a two-part series critical of statins by ABC TV's science program, Catalyst, a University of Sydney study reveals in the latest Medical Journal of Australia. [More]
Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]
Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

Adding high salt to high-fat diet prevents weight gain in mice

In a study that seems to defy conventional dietary wisdom, University of Iowa scientists have found that adding high salt to a high-fat diet actually prevents weight gain in mice. [More]
Dietary compounds in milk-based products may protect against cardiovascular risk

Dietary compounds in milk-based products may protect against cardiovascular risk

The Maillard reaction is a chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars that results in browned foods like seared steaks and toasted bread. When proteins and sugars are mixed together and heated, new chemical compounds are formed. Some are responsible for new flavors and some, according to a new study published in the Journal of Dairy Science, may protect us against cardiovascular disease. [More]
Study reveals new information about role of abdominal fat in teens with CAH

Study reveals new information about role of abdominal fat in teens with CAH

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have demonstrated that adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have significantly increased amounts of abdominal fat tissue, placing them at greater risk for harmful conditions linked to obesity, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). [More]
Only one in five patients qualified for free 'midlife MOT' takes NHS heart health check-ups

Only one in five patients qualified for free 'midlife MOT' takes NHS heart health check-ups

Only one in five patients eligible for a free "midlife MOT" on the NHS took up the offer in the first four years of the programme. [More]
New report highlights inequities in healthy food access in Baltimore City

New report highlights inequities in healthy food access in Baltimore City

A new report by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF), in collaboration with the Baltimore Food Policy Initiative, found that one in four of the city's residents live in so-called food deserts with limited access to healthy foods. [More]
Treating obesity with GLP-1 hormone helps prevent loss of bone mass associated with weight loss

Treating obesity with GLP-1 hormone helps prevent loss of bone mass associated with weight loss

Using the intestinal hormone GLP-1 in obesity treatment prevents the loss of bone mass otherwise frequently associated with major weight loss. This is the finding of a new study from the University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre and Glostrup Hospital. According to the researchers behind the study, the results may have a significant bearing on future obesity treatment. [More]
Amgen to discuss data supporting Repatha BLA for high cholesterol treatment with FDA EMDAC

Amgen to discuss data supporting Repatha BLA for high cholesterol treatment with FDA EMDAC

Amgen today announced that the Company will discuss the data supporting the Repatha (evolocumab) Biologics License Application (BLA) for the treatment of high cholesterol with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee (EMDAC). [More]
Study highlights the need to reduce non-communicable diseases

Study highlights the need to reduce non-communicable diseases

There is a great need to slow down the increasing number of people who die prematurely because of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. [More]
Study highlights the importance of nutrition for maintaining mental health

Study highlights the importance of nutrition for maintaining mental health

An international study involving the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry of the University of Valencia, recently published in 'The Lancet Psychiatry', highlights the importance of nutrition for maintaining mental health. Lecturer of Psychiatry Vicent Balanzá has participated in this study. [More]
Reactions to stress may play key role in long-term health

Reactions to stress may play key role in long-term health

Reacting positively to stressful situations may play a key role in long-term health, according to researchers. [More]
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