Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

In a study of more than 1.3 million Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California that stretched over 10 years, researchers found that blacks, Latinos and Asians generally had lower risk of coronary heart disease compared to whites. [More]
Indoor air quality in hospitality venues that allow smoking is worse than outdoor, study finds

Indoor air quality in hospitality venues that allow smoking is worse than outdoor, study finds

Research carried out in six cities with dangerous levels of air pollution indicates that air quality inside venues that allow smoking is even worse than outdoors. [More]
Oestrogen supplements could reduce dementia risk in women

Oestrogen supplements could reduce dementia risk in women

Women who take oestrogen supplements from before or at the start of menopause and continue with them for a few years have better preserved brain structure, which may reduce the risk of dementia. [More]
New interprofessional program aims to provide primary care and dental services to older adults

New interprofessional program aims to provide primary care and dental services to older adults

Primary care within a dental practice? It's an interdisciplinary idea that has teeth: Your mouth, noted the U.S. surgeon general in the Oral Health in America report, provides a window into your overall health. Now, a research team led by Maria Dolce, an associate professor in the School of Nursing at Northeastern, will make that idea a reality. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone (O3) face an increased risk of dying from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, according to the study "Long-Term Ozone Exposure and Mortality in a Large Prospective Study" published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Electrical stimulation could regulate, synchronize beating properties of nascent heart muscle cells

Electrical stimulation could regulate, synchronize beating properties of nascent heart muscle cells

Columbia Engineering researchers have shown, for the first time, that electrical stimulation of human heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) engineered from human stem cells aids their development and function. [More]
Common mortality causes prevail in epilepsy patients

Common mortality causes prevail in epilepsy patients

A prospective, community-based study confirms that patients with epilepsy usually die of the same causes as other people. [More]
Bradycardia does not increase cardiovascular disease risk

Bradycardia does not increase cardiovascular disease risk

Bradycardia - a slower than normal heartbeat - does not increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published in the Jan.19 online edition of the Journal of American Medical Association Internal Medicine. [More]
Phthalate DEHP could lead to weight gain

Phthalate DEHP could lead to weight gain

In cooperation with the Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases at the University of Leipzig and the University Hospital Leipzig, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research have now published a study in the PLOS ONE journal showing that the phthalate DEHP leads to weight gain and revealed the metabolic processes involved. [More]
Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health, lowers mortality risk

Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health, lowers mortality risk

The majority of citizens in developed countries should not be concerned by potential harm from exercise but rather by the lack of exercise in their lives, according to a clinical perspective published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology from the ACC Sports and Exercise Cardiology Leadership Council. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
Eating habits may influence sleep quality

Eating habits may influence sleep quality

A new study found that eating less fiber, more saturated fat and more sugar is associated with lighter, less restorative, and more disrupted sleep. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Cosentyx (secukinumab) for two new indications - the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative, a research initiative exploring the utility of genetic information in the clinical setting, has published a study and identified six noteworthy genes that affect human sleep duration. [More]
IMB scientists identify two proteins vital for demethylation of DNA

IMB scientists identify two proteins vital for demethylation of DNA

Scientists at the Institute of Molecular Biology in Mainz have identified a missing piece of the puzzle in understanding how epigenetic marks are removed from DNA. The research on DNA demethylation sheds new light on a fundamental process that is important in development and diseases such as cancer. [More]
Study opens new door on the causes of vision issues in astronauts

Study opens new door on the causes of vision issues in astronauts

Just when you think you've seen it all, our eyes look to be victims of a low-gravity environments, too. According to new research published in the January 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, two significant genetic differences in enzymes that direct the one-carbon pathway of metabolism can affect astronaut vision. [More]
Genetic factors in puberty timing: an interview with Dr John Perry

Genetic factors in puberty timing: an interview with Dr John Perry

The study focused on the genetic regions that influence age at voice breaking - a distinct developmental milestone that happens to young men as their larynx (voice box) lengthens when exposed to male hormones. [More]
AngioDefender holds much promise for personalized cardiac care

AngioDefender holds much promise for personalized cardiac care

For a non-descript box it wields a mighty name and even more impressive possibilities for people with heart disease. Called the AngioDefender, the machine - no bigger than a shoebox - holds much promise in the ability to personalize cardiac care, say researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, the research arm of St. Joseph's Health Care London. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement