Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Researchers develop new screening tool to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children

Researchers develop new screening tool to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children

Clinical investigators at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) have developed a new screening tool to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children. Their findings are published in Pediatric Pulmonology. [More]
Health Diagnostic Laboratory opens My HDL Hub health centers to prevent major chronic diseases

Health Diagnostic Laboratory opens My HDL Hub health centers to prevent major chronic diseases

Health Diagnostic Laboratory, Inc. is taking the next step in its mission to detect, prevent and reverse major chronic disease such as heart disease and diabetes with the launch of My HDL Hub health centers. HDL, Inc.'s My HDL Hub is a place for individuals to receive comprehensive blood tests, gain lifestyle, nutrition and fitness guidance with the company's Clinical Health Consultants and relate to others in the community with common goals of becoming healthier. [More]

People with low and very high levels of transferrin saturation ratio are at increased risk of death

A new study led by researchers at the Graduate Entry Medical School, University of Limerick has found that people with low levels and very high levels of a commonly measured laboratory test, the “transferrin saturation ratio” are at an increased risk of death. The test is a measure of the amount of available iron in the bloodstream with low levels generally reflecting a state of iron deficiency and high levels suggesting a relative excess. [More]

Research uncovers link between diet and blood cell markers of heart attack associated inflammation

New research further illuminates the heart-healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet, tying the eating plan to lower levels of platelets and white blood cells, two markers of inflammation. Inflammation has an association with greater risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]

Study shows administering steroids during cardiac surgery requiring bypass can cause harm

Giving patients steroids at the time of heart surgery does not improve health outcomes and appears to put them at greater risk of having a heart attack in the days following surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Amgen reports positive findings from AMG 145 Phase 3 studies in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Amgen reports positive findings from AMG 145 Phase 3 studies in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced new detailed data from three Phase 3 studies that showed treatment with its novel investigational cholesterol-lowering medication, evolocumab (AMG 145), resulted in a statistically significant reduction of 55-66 percent in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared to placebo in patients with high cholesterol. [More]

Researchers quantify proportion of adults potentially affected by updated 2014 BP recommendations

Applying the updated 2014 blood pressure (BP) guideline to the U.S. population suggests that nearly 6 million adults are no longer classified as needing hypertension medication, and that an estimated 13.5 million adults would now be considered as having achieved goal blood pressure, primarily older adults, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]
Newly identified protein markers have potential to contribute to better understanding of heart disease

Newly identified protein markers have potential to contribute to better understanding of heart disease

Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah, have discovered that elevated levels of two recently identified proteins in the body are inflammatory markers and indicators of the presence of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

A new study is giving hope to older men who are concerned about the effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on their sexual health. [More]
Aleglitazar drug does not reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

Aleglitazar drug does not reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

Use of the drug aleglitazar, which has shown the ability to lower glucose levels and have favorable effects on cholesterol, did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke among patients with type 2 diabetes and recent heart attack or unstable angina, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with presentation at the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]

Women who drink too many diet drinks a day more likely to have heart problems

It appears healthy postmenopausal women who drink two or more diet drinks a day may be more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Celiac disease people may have near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease

Celiac disease people may have near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease

People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Gastric surgery reduces heart attack risk in obese people

Gastric surgery reduces heart attack risk in obese people

Obese people who have stomach surgery to help them lose weight will halve their risk of heart attack according to new research from a team of doctors at the University of East Anglia, University of Manchester and University of Aberdeen. [More]
New angiographic analysis examines impact of stent thrombosis in patients undergoing PCI

New angiographic analysis examines impact of stent thrombosis in patients undergoing PCI

A new angiographic analysis of the CHAMPION PHOENIX trial examined the incidence and impact of stent thrombosis (ST) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Results of the study were released today and will be presented March 30 at the American College of Cardiology 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]

Reversing erectile dysfunction possible with lifestyle changes

Men suffering from sexual dysfunction can be successful at reversing their problem, by focusing on lifestyle factors and not just relying on medication, according to research at the University of Adelaide. [More]

BIDMC scientist wins Gairdner Award for landmark discovery in the field of angiogenesis

Harold F. Dvorak, MD, senior investigator in the Center for Vascular Biology Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and former chairman of BIDMC's Department of Pathology, is one of eight scientists to win the 2014 Canada Gairdner Awards, which recognize some of the most significant medical discoveries from around the world. Awarded by the Gairdner Foundation, based in Canada, the awards are considered among the most prestigious international awards in medical research. [More]
TV watching leads to excessive snacking, cardiovascular risk in middle school kids

TV watching leads to excessive snacking, cardiovascular risk in middle school kids

Middle school kids who park themselves in front of the TV for two hours or more each day are more likely to consume junk food and have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even compared to those who spend an equal amount of time on the computer or playing video games, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Women who have 4 or more live births more likely to show early signs of heart disease

Women who have 4 or more live births more likely to show early signs of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are much more likely to have evidence of plaque in their heart or thickening of their arteries - early signs of cardiovascular disease - compared with those having fewer pregnancies, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]