Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Babies' growth in the womb and their size at birth, especially their length, are strikingly similar the world over - when babies are born to healthy, well-educated and well-nourished mothers. [More]
Standard risk factors stratify already high-risk diabetic patients

Standard risk factors stratify already high-risk diabetic patients

Cardiovascular disease risk factors are associated with mortality even among patients with Type 2 diabetes who are already at high risk due to having high coronary artery calcified plaque, say researchers. [More]
High level of adiponectin linked to decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease

High level of adiponectin linked to decreased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease

It has been known for its flavorful addition to soups and as a delicacy for dogs but bone marrow fat may also have untapped health benefits, new research finds. [More]
New evidence for painless AF treatment to be presented at FCVB 2014

New evidence for painless AF treatment to be presented at FCVB 2014

The first evidence for a shockless treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) will be presented today at Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. T [More]
Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Researchers discover mechanical threshold that regulates angiogenesis

Angiogenesis, the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is essential to the body's development. As organs grow, vascular networks must grow with them to feed new cells and remove their waste. [More]
Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease are interconnected, say GW researchers

Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease are interconnected, say GW researchers

For more than 40 years, physicians have treated diminished kidney function as two distinct syndromes: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies suggest the two syndromes are not distinct entities, but interconnected. [More]
Analysis of clinical trials reveals urgent need to increase Alzheimer's drug development

Analysis of clinical trials reveals urgent need to increase Alzheimer's drug development

Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health have conducted the first-ever analysis of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD), revealing an urgent need to increase the number of agents entering the AD drug development pipeline and progressing successfully towards new therapy treatments. [More]
Westernisation responsible for high prevalence of obesity in Nigeria, say researchers

Westernisation responsible for high prevalence of obesity in Nigeria, say researchers

Researchers at Warwick Medical School believe that the lifestyle altering effects of westernisation could be responsible for the high prevalence of obesity, and associated health risks, in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
University of Sydney announces major initiative in the field of fertility research and treatment

University of Sydney announces major initiative in the field of fertility research and treatment

The University of Sydney today announced a major initiative in the field of fertility research and treatment, as it takes over ownership of Westmead IVF Pty Limited, the company which operates the private fertility clinic at Westmead Hospital, Westmead Fertility Centre. [More]
New study finds link between lower socioeconomic status and higher rates of peripheral artery disease

New study finds link between lower socioeconomic status and higher rates of peripheral artery disease

Previous research has established a link between lower socioeconomic status and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In a new study led by Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers have found that there are also higher rates of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in individuals with low income and lower attained education levels in the United States. [More]
Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Building upon their earlier research on the biology of fat metabolism, Joslin scientists discovered that microRNAs -small RNA molecules that play important roles in regulation in many types of tissue - play a major role in the distribution and determination of fat cells and whole body metabolism. [More]
Testosterone therapy does not increase men's risk for heart attack, shows UTMB study

Testosterone therapy does not increase men's risk for heart attack, shows UTMB study

Testosterone prescriptions for older men in the United States have increased more than three-fold over the past decade. Recent studies linking testosterone use with increased risk of heart attack and stroke have caused widespread concern among patients and their families. [More]
Cordis launches SABER Catheter for treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cordis launches SABER Catheter for treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cordis Corporation announced today the launch of its SABER PTA Dilatation Catheter ("SABER Catheter") for the treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). [More]
Use of NMR in diagnostic research: an interview with Elaine Holmes, Imperial College

Use of NMR in diagnostic research: an interview with Elaine Holmes, Imperial College

The Phenome Center developed out of the Olympic drug testing facility, and we've adapted it so that we use NMR spectrometry, which we have three spectrometers, and mass spectrometry, to take blood and urine from hundreds and thousands of people and profile them to get a biochemical fingerprint of every person. [More]
LifeBridge Health's Neil Meltzer wins AHA Gold Heart Award

LifeBridge Health's Neil Meltzer wins AHA Gold Heart Award

The Gold Heart Award, the American Heart Association's highest national recognition for volunteerism, was presented to Neil Meltzer, M.P.H., president and CEO of LifeBridge Health, for his two decades of exceptional leadership and advocacy at the annual Gold Heart Banquet in Dallas, Texas. [More]
Adults in their 30s and 40s can slash heart disease risk, study finds

Adults in their 30s and 40s can slash heart disease risk, study finds

The heart is more forgiving than you may think -- especially to adults who try to take charge of their health, a new Northwestern Medicine- study has found. [More]
Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

Omega-3 PUFAs offer an affordable way to reduce effects of traumatic brain, spinal cord injuries

The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) found in seafood and marine oils called EPA and DHA may offer a simple, affordable way to reduce the effects of traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries by decreasing inflammation and nerve cell damage. [More]
New smartphone app can reduce sedentary behavior in obese adults

New smartphone app can reduce sedentary behavior in obese adults

Even individuals who exercise a lot can be at risk for health problems if they also spend a lot of time in sedentary behaviors, such as sitting. [More]
Menopause-related changes in sex hormones linked to greater risk for heart disease

Menopause-related changes in sex hormones linked to greater risk for heart disease

As hormone levels change during the transition to menopause, the quality of a woman's cholesterol carriers degrades, leaving her at greater risk for heart disease, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health discovered. [More]
Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries

Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries

A simple non-surgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal Australians. [More]