Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women who are treated for high blood pressure are not given the same medication as men, nor do they hit the treatment targets as often, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg. [More]
Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Mental stress affects women's hearts more than men's

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis by researchers at Duke Medicine shows mental stress may tax women's hearts more than men's. [More]
Study reveals inner workings of PKA switch that regulates cellular functions, contributes to deadly disorders

Study reveals inner workings of PKA switch that regulates cellular functions, contributes to deadly disorders

A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders. [More]
Men and women have different cardiovascular, psychological reactions to mental stress

Men and women have different cardiovascular, psychological reactions to mental stress

Men and women have different cardiovascular and psychological reactions to mental stress, according to a study of men and women who were already being treated for heart disease. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
Champalimaud Foundation to establish cancer institute in Rajasthan, India

Champalimaud Foundation to establish cancer institute in Rajasthan, India

The Lisbon based Champalimaud Foundation has entered into a partnership with the Government of Rajasthan, India, to establish a state-of-the–art cancer institute with world-class facilities. [More]
Grand Challenges Canada announces 11 seed grants to improve mental health in developing countries

Grand Challenges Canada announces 11 seed grants to improve mental health in developing countries

On the day the world is collectively raising awareness on mental health issues, Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, announced new funding for 11 novel ideas to improve mental health in developing countries, one of the biggest unmet needs of our time. Seed grants of up to $270,000 are awarded to 11 innovators from Canada and low- and middle-income countries, totalling $2.9 million CAD. [More]
Decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health

Decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver. [More]
Overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging increases healthcare costs

Overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging increases healthcare costs

In a new study recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center concluded that overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging has led to rising healthcare costs and unnecessary radiation exposure to patients. [More]
New study finds that not having close access to healthy foods can deter even motivated dieters

New study finds that not having close access to healthy foods can deter even motivated dieters

You're obese, at risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and so motivated to improve your diet that you've enrolled in an intensive behavioral program. But if you need to travel more than a short distance to a store that offers a good selection of healthy food, your success may be limited. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
Leading experts urge Canadian health-care providers to improve care for people living with SCI

Leading experts urge Canadian health-care providers to improve care for people living with SCI

Leading Canadian spinal cord injury (SCI) experts have launched the unprecedented Spinal Cord Injury: A Manifesto for Change—a call to action and a plea for Canadian health-care providers and stakeholders to work in coordination to improve care and the health of people living with SCI in Canada. [More]
Genetic susceptibility to psychosocial stress can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

Genetic susceptibility to psychosocial stress can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease. [More]
Mymetics' innovative HIV vaccine candidate to enter new preclinical trial

Mymetics' innovative HIV vaccine candidate to enter new preclinical trial

Mymetics Corporation, a pioneer in the research and development of virosome-based vaccines to prevent transmission of human infectious diseases across mucosal membranes, announced today that its innovative HIV vaccine candidate will enter a new preclinical trial to confirm excellent results obtained in a previous trial. [More]
Study: Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary heart disease risk

Study: Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary heart disease risk

A recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland shows that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. The sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids include fish, vegetable oils, and nuts. [More]
Three institutions collaborate to study genetics of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia

Three institutions collaborate to study genetics of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia

Researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Medical School and collaborators at two other institutions will undertake the largest whole genome sequencing study funded to date, as they seek to better understand bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. [More]
Phase 3 COU-AA-302 results show ZYTIGA plus prednisone prolongs overall survival in men with chemotherapy-naive mCRPC

Phase 3 COU-AA-302 results show ZYTIGA plus prednisone prolongs overall survival in men with chemotherapy-naive mCRPC

A final analysis of the Phase 3 COU-AA-302 trial presented today at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress in Madrid, Spain showed that ZYTIGA® (abiraterone acetate) plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival (OS), compared to an active control of placebo plus prednisone, in men with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). [More]
Galmed Pharmaceuticals purchases EndoPAT devices, accessories from Itamar Medical

Galmed Pharmaceuticals purchases EndoPAT devices, accessories from Itamar Medical

Galmed Pharmaceuticals Ltd. ("Galmed"), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a once-daily, oral medication for the treatment of liver diseases and cholesterol gallstones, announced today that it purchased 60 EndoPAT™ devices and accessories from Itamar Medical Ltd. [More]
CVRx Barostim neo System receives CE Mark approval from NSAI for treatment of heart failure

CVRx Barostim neo System receives CE Mark approval from NSAI for treatment of heart failure

CVRx, Inc., a private medical device company, announced today it received CE Mark approval from the National Standards Authority of Ireland of the Barostim neo System for the treatment of heart failure. [More]
Health advocates call for the United Nations to support efforts to curb heart disease, stroke

Health advocates call for the United Nations to support efforts to curb heart disease, stroke

Heart disease and stroke contribute to 30 percent of global deaths, more than all infectious and parasitic diseases combined, and 11 cardiovascular organizations are calling for the United Nations to address prevention of heart disease and other non-communicable diseases. [More]