Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Low neighborhood socioeconomic status linked to increased cardiovascular disease risk among black residents

Low neighborhood socioeconomic status linked to increased cardiovascular disease risk among black residents

The lower a neighborhood's socioeconomic status is, the more likely its black residents are to develop heart disease and stroke, according to a new Drexel University-led public health study. [More]
Natural antioxidant can protect offspring of obese mice from NAFLD, study shows

Natural antioxidant can protect offspring of obese mice from NAFLD, study shows

A common antioxidant found in human breast milk and foods like kiwi fruit can protect against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the offspring of obese mice, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Alcohol abuse linked to increased risk of heart conditions

Alcohol abuse linked to increased risk of heart conditions

Alcohol abuse increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure as much as other well-established risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

You've likely heard about being in the right place at the wrong time, but what about having the right genes in the wrong environment? In other words, could a genetic mutation (or allele) that puts populations at risk for illnesses in one environmental setting manifest itself in positive ways in a different setting? [More]
Novel investigational drug may help restore cardiac function after heart failure

Novel investigational drug may help restore cardiac function after heart failure

Cimaglermin, a new experimental drug, may help restore cardiac function after heart failure, according to a first-in-man study published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. [More]
People with increased risk for heart disease could more likely have shoulder problems

People with increased risk for heart disease could more likely have shoulder problems

After all the lifting, hauling and wrapping, worn out gift givers may blame the season's physical strain for any shoulder soreness they are feeling. [More]
UCLA-led consortium receives $8.6 million NIH grant to map the heart's nervous system

UCLA-led consortium receives $8.6 million NIH grant to map the heart's nervous system

A consortium directed by UCLA's Dr. Kalyanam Shivkumar has received a three-year, $8.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to map the heart's nervous system. [More]
Discrimination interacts with certain genetic variants to negatively impact health

Discrimination interacts with certain genetic variants to negatively impact health

It's no secret that discrimination is stressful for those who experience it, but turns out the issue is more than skin deep—these stressors can interact with our genetics to negatively impact our health, a new University of Florida study shows. [More]
Heart attack risk for people with HIV nearly 50% higher than predicted

Heart attack risk for people with HIV nearly 50% higher than predicted

Current methods to predict the risk of heart attack and stroke vastly underestimate the risk in individuals with HIV, which is nearly double that of the general population, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Biomarker for oxidative stress plays key role in development of NAFLD, study shows

Biomarker for oxidative stress plays key role in development of NAFLD, study shows

Diet-related diseases like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are known to have a major inflammatory component. [More]
Regular use of aspirin could cut pancreatic cancer risk in half

Regular use of aspirin could cut pancreatic cancer risk in half

Regular use of aspirin by people living in Shanghai, China, was associated with decreased risk for developing pancreatic cancer, according to data published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Birth of infant with major congenital anomaly linked to increased risk of death in mother

Birth of infant with major congenital anomaly linked to increased risk of death in mother

In Denmark, having a child with a major congenital anomaly was associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of death in the mother compared with women without an affected child, according to a study appearing in the December 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
Red meat consumption does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, review suggests

Red meat consumption does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, review suggests

Consuming red meat in amounts above what is typically recommended does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as blood pressure and blood cholesterol, according to a new review of clinical trials from Purdue University. [More]
Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular use of over-the-counter non-steroidal inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of dying in patients diagnosed with Type 1 endometrial cancers, according to a new population-based study led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
NIH-funded scientists work with three ‘omes’ to understand human health

NIH-funded scientists work with three ‘omes’ to understand human health

Have you ever collected coins, cards, toy trains, stuffed animals? Did you feel the need to complete the set? If so, then you may be a completist. A completist will go to great lengths to acquire a complete set of something. [More]
People with less education at increased risk of heart attack, Australian research finds

People with less education at increased risk of heart attack, Australian research finds

People who leave school without a school certificate are more than twice as likely to have a heart attack as those with a university degree, according to groundbreaking new Australian research from the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere, the Sax Institute's 45 and Up Study. [More]
Reducing cholesterol to level of newborn baby lowers cardiovascular disease risk, research finds

Reducing cholesterol to level of newborn baby lowers cardiovascular disease risk, research finds

Reducing our cholesterol levels to those of a new-born baby significantly lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research. [More]
Scientists discover possible way to stop activation of proteins known to cause age-related diseases

Scientists discover possible way to stop activation of proteins known to cause age-related diseases

Researchers at the University of Surrey, in collaboration with the Universities of Reading and Cologne, and the Royal Berkshire Hospital, have discovered that it is possible to stop the activation of a group of proteins (NADPH Oxidase) known to cause most of the diseases of ageing. [More]
Red cabbage microgreens help lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease in mice

Red cabbage microgreens help lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease in mice

Microgreens are sprouting up everywhere from upscale restaurants to home gardens. They help spruce up old recipes with intense flavors and colors, and are packed with nutrients. [More]
Additional MRI scan during pregnancy could help accurately detect foetal abnormalities

Additional MRI scan during pregnancy could help accurately detect foetal abnormalities

An additional MRI scan during pregnancy could help to more accurately detect foetal abnormalities and give more certainty for parents whose 20-week ultrasound scan showed a potential problem, according to new research by scientists at the University of Sheffield. [More]
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