Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

In recent years, public health concerns about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have risen significantly, driven in part by affected military veterans returning from conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere. PTSD is associated with number of psychological maladies, among them chronic depression, anger, insomnia, eating disorders and substance abuse. [More]
1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable. [More]
New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

Obesity is a serious health problem affecting approximately one-third of the adult population in the United States. Obese individuals have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. A recent study led by a University of Missouri researcher has identified the enzyme responsible for obesity-related hypertension -- a finding that could lead to new treatment options. [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
AIDS patients at increased risk of developing intermediate-stage AMD

AIDS patients at increased risk of developing intermediate-stage AMD

Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have a four-fold increase in their risk of developing intermediate-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared to people of the same age who are not infected with HIV, according to results from the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA) presented today at the 2015 ARVO Annual Meeting in Denver, CO. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism by which embryos receive nutrition in early stages of pregnancy

Scientists reveal mechanism by which embryos receive nutrition in early stages of pregnancy

The mechanism by which embryos receive nutrition during the first 11 weeks of pregnancy has been revealed by University of Manchester scientists. [More]
Global market for cardiac rhythm management devices worth $13 billion for 2015

Global market for cardiac rhythm management devices worth $13 billion for 2015

The global market for cardiac rhythm management devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators is worth about $13 billion for 2015, according to Kalorama Information. The market research publisher said the market has benefited from the demand to move to a more mobile, wireless and efficient system both within major health facilities and in the home treatment markets. There is also an increasing trend to upgrade to more portable devices and devices which have added benefits such as MRI compatibility. [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Using a simple device for eight hours a night to treat sleep apnea can help people with prediabetes improve their blood sugar levels and may reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes, according to a new study published online in the April 21, 2015, issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Resverlogix, Hepalink announce equity investment and license agreement for RVX-208

Resverlogix, Hepalink announce equity investment and license agreement for RVX-208

Resverlogix Corp. today announced that it has entered into a Framework Agreement which sets forth the principal business terms for an equity investment and a license of RVX-208, for all indications, to Shenzhen Hepalink Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. for China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau (the "Territories"). [More]
Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Millions of people are dying from common, easily treatable conditions like appendicitis, fractures, or obstructed labour because they do not have access to, or can't afford, proper surgical care, according to a major new Commission, published in The Lancet. [More]
Brachytherapy improves overall survival for women with inoperable early stage endometrial cancer

Brachytherapy improves overall survival for women with inoperable early stage endometrial cancer

Women who have early stage endometrial cancer and are inoperable tend to live longer if they have been treated with brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation, according to new research to be presented at the 3rd ESTRO Forum in Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday. [More]
Record number of abstracts submitted to Heart Failure 2015

Record number of abstracts submitted to Heart Failure 2015

A record number of abstracts have been submitted to the world's leading heart failure congress, promising more original science than ever before. [More]
NPC recognized as top ranking company on DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list

NPC recognized as top ranking company on DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation has been named the top company for diversity for the second year in a row on the annual DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity listing. DiversityInc announced the results of its 2015 Top 50 Companies for Diversity on April 23 at an awards ceremony in New York, NY. [More]
Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Results from a large population-based cohort of almost a million people in the UK found that the chances of dying from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), over a 14-year period, was approximately 50% higher than for those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Enrollment begins for first major cardiovascular prevention trial for people infected with HIV

Enrollment begins for first major cardiovascular prevention trial for people infected with HIV

The first clinical trial to investigate whether treatment with a statin drug can reduce the increased cardiovascular disease risk in people infected with HIV has begun enrolling patients. Based at Massachusetts General Hospital, the six-year, $40 million REPRIEVE (Randomized Study to Prevent Vascular Events in HIV) trial will be conducted at around 100 sites in the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico and Thailand with funding from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in collaboration with the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and support from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Study shows that Hodgkin lymphoma patients can remain disease-free with just chemotherapy alone

Study shows that Hodgkin lymphoma patients can remain disease-free with just chemotherapy alone

In a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the scientists show that a positron-emission tomography (PET) scan immediately after treatment with chemotherapy can identify patients who have a very good outcome without additional radiotherapy. [More]
Sugar-sweetened beverages increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Sugar-sweetened beverages increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Beverages sweetened with low, medium and high amounts of high-fructose corn syrup significantly increase risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even when consumed for just two weeks by young, healthy men and women, reports a team of researchers at the University of California, Davis. [More]
Study examines impact of smoking on cardiovascular risk in older people

Study examines impact of smoking on cardiovascular risk in older people

In the most comprehensive study ever on the impact of smoking on cardiovascular disease in older people, epidemiologist Dr. Ute Mons from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) analyzed 25 individual studies, compiling data from over half a million individuals age 60 and older. [More]
May issues of AGA's journals highlight important research updates on liver disease

May issues of AGA's journals highlight important research updates on liver disease

The May issues of AGA's journals -- Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology -- highlight important research updates on the most deadly forms of liver disease. [More]
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