Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Study finds link between chronic inflammation and premenstrual symptoms

Study finds link between chronic inflammation and premenstrual symptoms

Women with premenstrual symptoms (PMS) including mood swings, weight gain/bloating, and abdominal cramps/back pain have elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Statins can lower infection risk by 58% in stroke patients

Statins can lower infection risk by 58% in stroke patients

A Washington State University researcher has found that statin drugs can dramatically lower the risk of infections in stroke patients. [More]
Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging. [More]
Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Eating three more portions of dietary fiber a day--say, two pieces of whole grain bread and a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal--is associated with a lower risk for all cardiovascular diseases and for dying of cancer, diabetes, and respiratory and infectious diseases, a study just published in the BMJ has shown. [More]
Prospective biobank studies with genetic data can help improve drug development, reduce costs

Prospective biobank studies with genetic data can help improve drug development, reduce costs

With drug development costs topping $1.2bn (£850 million) to get a single treatment to the point it can be sold and used in the clinic, could genetic analysis save hundreds of millions of dollars? [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

Nut consumption may lower risk of overall mortality in prostate cancer patients

In a large prospective study published online in the British Journal of Cancer, researchers looked at the association between nut consumption and prostate cancer risk and mortality among 47,299 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. [More]
Mayo researchers develop extremely precise assay to measure age-associated changes in GDF11

Mayo researchers develop extremely precise assay to measure age-associated changes in GDF11

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed an accurate way to measure a circulating factor, called GDF11, to better understand its potential impact on the aging process. [More]
Female migraine patients have increased cardiovascular disease risk

Female migraine patients have increased cardiovascular disease risk

Women who suffer from migraine headaches have a slightly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in later life. A team of researchers led by Prof. Tobias Kurth, Head of the Institute of Public Health at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, has now been able to establish the following: female migraine patients have a higher risk of stroke or heart attacks than women without migraine. [More]
Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Two classes of blood pressure medications, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with a 16% lower risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a new study in the journal, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, reports. [More]
Many Brazilians not taking advantage of health benefits of exercise

Many Brazilians not taking advantage of health benefits of exercise

As Brazilians make final preparations to host the world's premier showcase of athleticism, the Olympics, a new paper in the Journal of the American Heart Association reports that many citizens of the host country are not taking enough advantage of the health benefits of exercise. [More]
Liraglutide cardioprotective in high-risk Type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide cardioprotective in high-risk Type 2 diabetes patients

Findings of the LEADER trial show that liraglutide treatment may confer a reduced risk of cardiovascular events in patients with Type 2 diabetes and a high vascular risk. [More]
Darapladib drug can protect against vision loss in diabetic patients

Darapladib drug can protect against vision loss in diabetic patients

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast and University College London have discovered that a drug, originally developed to treat cardiovascular disease, has the potential to reduce diabetes related blindness. [More]
Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Researchers have shown that the glucose-lowering drug liraglutide safely and effectively decreases the overall risk of heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death for people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment

Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment

The first consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies is set to be published simultaneously in EP-Europace, HeartRhythm, and the Journal of Arrhythmia. The key contents are launched today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016. [More]
Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time that a combination of text messages and individual counselling sessions to motivate patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) to be more active resulted in improved patient-reported clinical outcomes. [More]
Heart rhythm disorder may increase death risk in motor vehicle accident victims

Heart rhythm disorder may increase death risk in motor vehicle accident victims

A study in nearly three million motor vehicle accident victims has found that atrial fibrillation is associated with a higher risk of death. [More]
Disruption of SVIP protein can lead to cardiovascular, fatty liver disease

Disruption of SVIP protein can lead to cardiovascular, fatty liver disease

A UCF College of Medicine researcher has identified for the first time a tiny liver protein that when disrupted can lead to the nation's top killer -- cardiovascular disease -- as well as fatty liver disease, a precursor to cancer. [More]
ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

People with type 2 diabetes who intensively controlled their blood sugar level during the landmark Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial Eye Study were found to have cut their risk of diabetic retinopathy in half in a follow-up analysis conducted four years after stopping intensive therapy. [More]
NHS Health Checks may not be best option for preventing CVD in England

NHS Health Checks may not be best option for preventing CVD in England

A University of Liverpool study published in the British Medical Journal has found the UK population's cardiovascular health is not being supported enough by the NHS Health Check programme. [More]
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