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New paper provides insights into impact of music therapy on anxiety of surgical patients

New paper provides insights into impact of music therapy on anxiety of surgical patients

A new paper published in the September 2016 issue of the AORN Journal provides insights into the impact of implementing a music therapy program for surgical patients. [More]
New protocol may decrease occurrence of POAF in heart patients

New protocol may decrease occurrence of POAF in heart patients

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition in which the upper chambers of the heart contract in a way that's out of sync with the lower chambers, causing an irregular heartbeat and poor blood flow to the body. [More]
Study sheds new light on why colon cancers are more aggressive in African Americans

Study sheds new light on why colon cancers are more aggressive in African Americans

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers, a research collaboration which includes University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, who last year identified new gene mutations unique to colon cancers in African Americans, have found that tumors with these mutations are highly aggressive and more likely to recur and metastasize. [More]
Synthetic heart valves, arteries and veins could vastly improve bypass surgery techniques

Synthetic heart valves, arteries and veins could vastly improve bypass surgery techniques

A UBC invention has made it possible for doctors to vastly improve their bypass surgery techniques without relying on animals. [More]
Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms

Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms

A new study recently published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery questions whether patients with isolated moderate to severe mitral valve regurgitation should receive treatment in earlier stages instead of waiting until symptoms appear. [More]
New study of fMRI aims to develop efficient real-time method to detect brain activation in AD patients

New study of fMRI aims to develop efficient real-time method to detect brain activation in AD patients

Researchers at University Hospitals Case Medical Center are beginning a study of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect how brain activation in patients in early and middle stages of Alzheimer's disease compares to people without it. [More]
UH cardiologists implant first Abbott Absorb stent on patient with coronary artery disease

UH cardiologists implant first Abbott Absorb stent on patient with coronary artery disease

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is among the first in the country - and the first in Ohio - to offer and deploy the Abbott Absorb stent, a completely bioresorbable stent. [More]
UH implants Abbott's Absorb dissolving stent on coronary artery disease patient

UH implants Abbott's Absorb dissolving stent on coronary artery disease patient

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is among the first in the country - and the first in Ohio - to offer and deploy the Abbott Absorb stent, a completely bioresorbable stent. The Absorb stent works exactly as its traditional metallic predecessors in that it opens a blocked coronary artery, with one major exception - it dissolves completely in the body two to three years after implantation. [More]
AANA clarifies truth behind VA's proposed rule

AANA clarifies truth behind VA's proposed rule

There is a lot of press coverage about the VA proposed rule to allow advanced practice registered nurses, including Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, to practice to the full scope of their education, training, and licensure in the Veterans Health Administration. [More]
PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

Although surgery can prolong the lives of patients with an aggressive type of cancer called malignant pleural mesothelioma, many patients avoid the operation for fear it will degrade their quality of life. [More]
Researcher explores whether DBS can help improve life of bipolar disorder patients

Researcher explores whether DBS can help improve life of bipolar disorder patients

Jennifer Sweet, MD, a neurosurgeon at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, recently opened a clinical research study to learn if there is a structural target in the brain for patients suffering from bipolar disorder and whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) can bring them relief. [More]
UPMC study gives better understanding of cardiac arrhythmia following lung transplantation

UPMC study gives better understanding of cardiac arrhythmia following lung transplantation

Cardiac arrhythmia is a common complication following lung transplantation, and one that has a significant negative impact on long-term patient survival, reports a team of UPMC researchers in the largest study of its kind to date. [More]
Pediatric feasibility study results set stage for clinical trial of world’s first bioabsorbable heart valve enabling Endogenous Tissue Restoration

Pediatric feasibility study results set stage for clinical trial of world’s first bioabsorbable heart valve enabling Endogenous Tissue Restoration

One-year follow-up results from a pediatric feasibility study of Xeltis bioabsorbable cardiovascular pulmonary graft have been presented as late-breaker at the 96th American Association for Thoracic Surgery annual meeting today. [More]
First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

Current cardiovascular valve or blood vessel implants are generally associated with a number of complications, have limited efficacy over time, and may necessitate repeated interventions over a patient's lifetime, especially when implanted in a young child. [More]
New form of SBRT to deliver radiation to specific area of prostate cancer

New form of SBRT to deliver radiation to specific area of prostate cancer

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center physicians have started the world's first clinical trial using a new form of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to deliver radiation to a specific area of the prostate invaded with cancer - instead of the entire gland. The study aims to determine if treating a targeted cancer region within the prostate in early stage prostate cancer can increase treatment options and reduce the side effects of radiation. [More]
Clinical study to evaluate safety of investigational cell therapy to treat chronic motor deficits after stroke

Clinical study to evaluate safety of investigational cell therapy to treat chronic motor deficits after stroke

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the first surgical site for a Phase 2b clinical trial study to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of an investigational cell therapy for the treatment of chronic motor deficit following an ischemic stroke. [More]
LivaNova announces first implantation of Perceval sutureless valve in U.S.

LivaNova announces first implantation of Perceval sutureless valve in U.S.

LivaNova, PLC (the “Company”), a global medical technology company and a leader in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, announced the first U.S. implantation of the Perceval valve, the sutureless biological aortic replacement valve. [More]
Diets high in glycemic index linked to increased risk of lung cancer

Diets high in glycemic index linked to increased risk of lung cancer

Consuming a diet with a high glycemic index, a classification of how rapidly carbohydrates elevate blood sugar levels, was independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in non-Hispanic whites, according to a new epidemiologic study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Closing patient knowledge gap could encourage cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials

Closing patient knowledge gap could encourage cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials

A five-center national study led by Neal Meropol, MD, and a team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center demonstrated that a little information goes a long way in encouraging cancer patients to enroll in clinical trials, a decision that could be potentially lifesaving. [More]
Reducing cost for screening does not increase colorectal cancer screening rates

Reducing cost for screening does not increase colorectal cancer screening rates

Making colonoscopy available at no cost to eligible Medicare beneficiaries under the Affordable Care Act did not increase the number of people in this target population who regularly undergo the procedure, says a new large scale national study from University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center. [More]
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