Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
New model predicts that prevalence of obesity among Australian adults may significantly increase by 2025

New model predicts that prevalence of obesity among Australian adults may significantly increase by 2025

New modelling predicts the prevalence of obesity and severe obesity among Australian adults will significantly increase by 2025, as part of a wider research project examining the most effective ways to combat obesity. [More]
Study underscores importance of preventing risk factors across entire lifespan

Study underscores importance of preventing risk factors across entire lifespan

Prevention of cardiovascular disease in mid- to later life in black and white Americans is an increasingly important health concern, according to a study from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke project recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. [More]
Does exercise eliminate the ill effects of sitting? An interview with Prof. Ulf Ekelund

Does exercise eliminate the ill effects of sitting? An interview with Prof. Ulf Ekelund

In short, the detrimental effects of sitting for prolonged hours can be divided into acute, or short-term, and long-term effects. [More]
New technology for measuring heart health and internal age now available worldwide

New technology for measuring heart health and internal age now available worldwide

VitalSines, Inc. the innovators behind, iheart, the world’s most accurate biological health reader, today announces the heart-monitoring technology is widely available for purchase. [More]
Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

For years, marketers and other commercial data-miners have been using Twitter's vast database of "tweets" to gauge consumer attitudes and track events. Now medical researchers are getting in on the trend. [More]
Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD

Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD

Eating bread made with ancient grains as part of a healthy diet could help lower cholesterol and blood glucose levels—leading risk factors for heart attack and stroke—according to new research published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. [More]
Aflatoxin exposure can weaken airways' defenses opening door for severe respiratory diseases

Aflatoxin exposure can weaken airways' defenses opening door for severe respiratory diseases

Toxins from mold found growing on nuts or corn can weaken the airways' self-clearing mechanisms and immunity, opening the door for respiratory diseases and exacerbating existing ones, suggests a study in Nature Scientific Reports published this month from otolaryngology researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Study evaluates link between lowering LDL-C and CV risk reduction across statin and nonstatin therapies

Study evaluates link between lowering LDL-C and CV risk reduction across statin and nonstatin therapies

In a study appearing in the September 27 issue of JAMA, Marc S. Sabatine, M.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the association between lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and relative cardiovascular risk reduction across different statin and nonstatin therapies. [More]
Interval exercise plans help improve endothelial function in older adults with type 2 diabetes

Interval exercise plans help improve endothelial function in older adults with type 2 diabetes

Resistance-based interval exercise helps improve endothelial function—including blood flow and blood vessel dilation—both in older adults with type 2 diabetes and in age-matched non-exercisers and regular exercisers, according to new research published in the American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology. [More]
Headache disorders may increase risk of thyroid condition

Headache disorders may increase risk of thyroid condition

Sufferers of migraines, cluster headaches, tension headaches or other headache disorders are at greater risk of developing a thyroid condition called hypothyroidism, according to a study by University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Changes to city design, transport can have significant impact on health

Changes to city design, transport can have significant impact on health

A new Series, published in The Lancet quantifies the health gains that could be achieved if cities incentivised a shift from private car use to cycling and walking, and promoted a compact city model where distances to shops and facilities, including public transport, are shorter and within walking distance. [More]
Royal Philips partners with World Heart Federation to help people better manage cardiac health

Royal Philips partners with World Heart Federation to help people better manage cardiac health

In celebration of World Heart Day on September 29, 2016, Royal Philips, a leading health technology company, today announced a new partnership with the World Heart Federation to help people better manage their heart health. [More]
Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

There's a big debate right now in the migraine community around the underlying cause of the disease. The question is whether it is vascular, and has something to do with our vessels, or whether it has to do with our neurons not functioning correctly or misfiring. [More]
New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

It has become commonly accepted that women do worse than men following a heart attack or other coronary event. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life

High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life

About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients. [More]
SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

Scotland has a strong legacy as one of the pioneers of medical imaging. In the late 70s, Aberdeen University became the first institution to develop a full body MRI scanner; the system named the Mark I prototype was an enormous step forward for healthcare. [More]
Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

The Center for Global Health in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to honor Ernest Madu, MD, chairman and CEO of the Heart Institute of the Caribbean with its first annual Global Health Champion Award. [More]
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