Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
European cardiovascular prevention guidelines emphasise population approaches

European cardiovascular prevention guidelines emphasise population approaches

The European Society of Cardiology has updated its cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines to include, for the first time, population approaches to be implemented by legislators, schools and workplaces. [More]
Lancet study links worldwide economic crisis to increased cancer mortality

Lancet study links worldwide economic crisis to increased cancer mortality

Unemployment and reduced public-sector health spending following the 2008 global economic crisis were associated with increased cancer mortality, according to a new study published in The Lancet. [More]
Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Researchers at the Buck Institute have shown a new effect on aging via a small drug-like molecule that alters the perception of food in the nematode C. elegans. Publishing in Aging Cell, researchers "tricked" the worm's metabolism into a state of caloric restriction, extending the animal's lifespan by 50 percent. [More]
Accumulation of gut bacterial metabolite may lead to serious health problems in CKD patients

Accumulation of gut bacterial metabolite may lead to serious health problems in CKD patients

In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), the accumulation of a gut bacterial metabolite that's normally excreted in urine may contribute to serious health problems. The findings come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Prepackaged food may contribute to more weight loss than self-selected diet

Prepackaged food may contribute to more weight loss than self-selected diet

Increased portion sizes in Americans' diets is widely recognized as a contributor to the obesity epidemic, and now new research published in Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society, examines the effect of prepackaged, portion-controlled meals on weight loss. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Sodium excretion linked to CVD risk in chronic kidney disease

Sodium excretion linked to CVD risk in chronic kidney disease

High levels of sodium excretion are associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), US study findings indicate. [More]
Even light or non-drinkers who become easily inebriated may develop fatty liver disease

Even light or non-drinkers who become easily inebriated may develop fatty liver disease

People who have reduced enzyme activity to breakdown active aldehyde, i.e., those who become easily inebriated, are more likely to develop fatty liver disease even if they do not drink alcohol. [More]
Study finds gap in screening for lipid abnormalities among adults taking antipsychotic medications

Study finds gap in screening for lipid abnormalities among adults taking antipsychotic medications

Too few adults taking antipsychotic medications are being screened for abnormalities in lipids, which include cholesterol and triglycerides, new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus finds. [More]
Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

Study finds link between sodium intake and clinical CVD events in CKD patients

In a study appearing in the May 24/31 issue of JAMA, Jiang He, M.D., Ph.D., of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, and colleagues evaluated more than 3,500 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD), examining the association between urinary sodium excretion and clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. [More]
Microvascular disease burden tied to CVD outcomes in diabetic patients

Microvascular disease burden tied to CVD outcomes in diabetic patients

The risk of cardiovascular disease events in patients with Type 2 diabetes rises in line with their cumulative burden of microvascular disease, research shows. [More]
Urinary sodium excretion study attracts controversy

Urinary sodium excretion study attracts controversy

A pooled analysis in The Lancet showing a U-shaped association between urinary sodium excretion and cardiovascular disease has drawn criticism. [More]
Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Nanosized Trojan horses created from a patient's own immune cells have successfully treated inflammation by overcoming the body's complex defense mechanisms, perhaps leading to broader applications for treating diseases characterized by inflammation, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

The flu jab is associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today in a late breaking trial session at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

A new study from a group of international researchers has identified a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity—aerobic exercise. [More]
First flexible wearable device can monitor biochemical, electric signals in human body

First flexible wearable device can monitor biochemical, electric signals in human body

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. [More]
Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

Aggressive blood pressure intervention can benefit frail adults aged 75 and older

NIH-supported researchers are reporting additional details about a widely-publicized study that linked a systolic blood pressure target under 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) with reduced cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of death. [More]
Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

A large worldwide study has found that, contrary to popular thought, low-salt diets may not be beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death compared to average salt consumption. [More]
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