Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Corn oil has greater effects on blood cholesterol than extra virgin olive oil

Corn oil has greater effects on blood cholesterol than extra virgin olive oil

A study published in the January/February 2015 issue of the Journal of Clinical Lipidology indicates corn oil significantly reduces cholesterol more than extra virgin olive oil with favorable changes in both total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. [More]
Study reveals how the brain can use fatty acids to control liver lipid production

Study reveals how the brain can use fatty acids to control liver lipid production

Ways of keeping the heart healthy has widened, with the discovery that the brain can help fight off hardening of the arteries. [More]
WHI releases new Special Collection on Women's Heart Health

WHI releases new Special Collection on Women's Heart Health

Today the peer-reviewed journal Women's Health Issues (WHI) released a new Special Collection on Women's Heart Health, with a focus on improving healthcare services to women at risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Scientists identify biological clock that can help predict individual's age

Scientists identify biological clock that can help predict individual's age

Scientists have identified a biological clock that provides vital clues about how long a person is likely to live. [More]
Exposure to certain chemicals may lead to early menopause

Exposure to certain chemicals may lead to early menopause

Women who are exposed to certain chemicals are more likely to experience menopause at a younger age, according to a newly published study by a researcher from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and two colleagues have received a $2.2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the links between depression, depression treatment and cardiovascular disease in adults with HIV. [More]
CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

CUMC evaluates impact, cost-effectiveness of implementing new hypertension guidelines

Full implementation of new hypertension guidelines could prevent 56,000 cardiovascular disease events (mostly heart attacks and strokes) and 13,000 deaths each year, without increasing overall health care costs, an analysis conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

High cholesterol in mid-life can impact heart health later

Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. [More]
Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. [More]
Deprived, ethnic minority areas in England worst affected by air pollution

Deprived, ethnic minority areas in England worst affected by air pollution

A new study has found big differences in air pollution across communities in England, with deprived and ethnic minority areas the worst affected. [More]
OUP publishes first issue of ESC's European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy

OUP publishes first issue of ESC's European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy

Oxford University Press is delighted to announce the publication of the first issue of European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy (EHJCVP), which it is publishing on behalf of the European Society for Cardiology and the Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy. [More]
Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed according to new research from the David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Lenore Arab. Cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants that consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. [More]
UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

Medical tests are stressful. Invasive tests, stress tests and unnecessary surgeries are too, not to mention the costs associated with all of them, but the alternative of undiagnosed heart problems are not. They can be fatal. [More]
Echo Therapeutics re-establishes operational and strategic partnership with MTIA

Echo Therapeutics re-establishes operational and strategic partnership with MTIA

Echo Therapeutics, Inc., a medical device company focused on skin permeation, continuous glucose monitoring, and associated technologies, announced today that it has re-established its operational and strategic partnership with Medical Technologies Innovation Asia, Ltd., Hong Kong, and has initiated the technology transfer process. [More]
Study suggests link between neonatal ghrelin and obesity risk

Study suggests link between neonatal ghrelin and obesity risk

Our subconscious motivation to eat is powerfully and dynamically regulated by hormone signals. The gut-derived hormone ghrelin is one such key regulator, promoting appetite through its effects on neurons in a small region of the brain called the hypothalamus. [More]
People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

People hospitalized for pneumonia at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Your chance of having a heart attack or stroke increases significantly if you have been hospitalized for pneumonia, according to a paper published today in the influential JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). [More]
Study: Michigan autoworkers are at increased risk for heart disease

Study: Michigan autoworkers are at increased risk for heart disease

A Michigan State University study is the first to indicate that the state's autoworkers are at a higher risk of heart disease compared to the U.S. population overall. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]