Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group physicians selected for Best Doctors in America List for 2015-2016

Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group physicians selected for Best Doctors in America List for 2015-2016

Sixty-one physicians affiliated with Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group, the faculty practice of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, were selected for the Best Doctors in America® List for 2015-2016. Only 5 percent of physicians in the United States earn this prestigious honor, determined by impartial peer review. [More]
Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

While most primary care physicians responding to a survey taken in late 2014 and early 2015 expressed confidence in their ability to identify potential cases of Ebola and communicate Ebola risks to their patients, only 50 to 70 percent of them gave answers that fit with CDC guidelines when asked how they would care for hypothetical patients who might have been exposed to Ebola. [More]
Air and noise pollution has severe consequences on heart health

Air and noise pollution has severe consequences on heart health

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart disease and stroke, are the no 1 killer worldwide and in Europe, where they cause the death of over 10 000 people daily, i.e. more than all cancers combined. [More]
Philips to showcase latest cardiology solutions at ESC Congress 2015

Philips to showcase latest cardiology solutions at ESC Congress 2015

Royal Philips today announced its presence at ESC Congress 2015, where the company is showcasing its latest cardiology solutions, including Heart ModelA.I., EchoNavigator and IntelliSpace Cardiovascular, that connect people and technology with care protocols to assist diagnosis, guide treatment and enable home care. [More]
Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Melatonin hormone can help prevent cardiovascular disease risk in children born through ART

Studies are revealing that children born through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The increased risk is due to changes in the expression of the genes important for vascular health. These studies suggest that the composition of the solutions in which embryo fertilization and culturing are done is to blame. [More]
School meals become more nutritious

School meals become more nutritious

The amount of whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables offered in school meals is up and sodium is down, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Thursday. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy has risen by more than six years since 1990 as healthy life expectancy grows; ischemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, and stroke cause the most health loss around the world. [More]
Rehabilitation can improve prognosis for heart disease, reduce patient mortality

Rehabilitation can improve prognosis for heart disease, reduce patient mortality

Rehabilitation is recommended for many patients following a hospital stay for acute heart disease. In a recent original article in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl int 112: 527-34) Axel Schlitt et al. show that this improves prognosis for heart disease and can thus reduce patient mortality. [More]
Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

While some research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids can protect brain health, a large clinical trial by researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older persons. With 4,000 patients followed over a five-year period, the study is one of the largest and longest of its kind. [More]
New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome is the most common disorder of the male sex chromosomes, yet is rarely diagnosed in children. A new assessment tool is being developed by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to help pediatricians detect the physical traits of the syndrome. The tool could pave the way for early interventions that prevent and treat a range of physical, psychological, social, and cognitive impairments. [More]
Amgen to present data on Repatha (evolocumab) and observational studies at ESC Congress 2015

Amgen to present data on Repatha (evolocumab) and observational studies at ESC Congress 2015

Amgen today announced that it will present six abstracts at the upcoming ESC Congress 2015, organized by the European Society of Cardiology, being held Aug. 29 – Sept. 2 in London. [More]
Novel ESC paper highlights significance of e-health in tackling heart disease

Novel ESC paper highlights significance of e-health in tackling heart disease

E-health is vital to winning the battle against heart disease, European cardiology leaders said today in a European Society of Cardiology position paper published in European Heart Journal. The novel paper outlines how the ESC will exploit e-health in education and research, while tackling issues of quality control and data security. [More]
High blood sugar may reduce positive effects of exercise on bone health in diabetic patients

High blood sugar may reduce positive effects of exercise on bone health in diabetic patients

Diabetes, which now affects almost 30 million Americans, can cause serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower-extremity amputations. [More]
High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

Obese atrial fibrillation patients have a lower chance of arrhythmia recurrence if they have high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk continues to decline as exercise capacity increases as part of treatment, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Primary care physicians' starring role key to weight loss, find Johns Hopkins researchers

Primary care physicians' starring role key to weight loss, find Johns Hopkins researchers

A review of survey data from more than 300 obese people who participated in a federally funded weight loss clinical trial found that although the overall weight loss rates were modest, those who rated their primary care doctor's support as particularly helpful lost about twice as many pounds as those who didn't. [More]
Berg and University of Miami extend partnership to battle cardiac dysfunction, heart failure

Berg and University of Miami extend partnership to battle cardiac dysfunction, heart failure

Berg, a Boston-based biopharmaceutical company, and the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine are extending its collaboration to battle cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. According to the American Heart Association, cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for 17.3 million deaths per year, a number that is expected to grow to more than 23.6 million by 2030. [More]
Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Virginia Tech researchers have identified a biomarker in pre-diabetic individuals that could help prevent them from developing Type II diabetes. [More]
Stroke more likely if you work long hours, major study finds

Stroke more likely if you work long hours, major study finds

People who work long hours are at a greater risk of stroke and coronary heart disease than people who work a standard week, according to the largest study of the issue to date, published in The Lancet. [More]
EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company today announced positive top-line results from EMPA-REG OUTCOME. This is a long-term clinical trial investigating cardiovascular (CV) outcomes for Jardiance (empagliflozin) in more than 7,000 adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at high risk for CV events. [More]
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