Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

The proposed link between caffeine and reductions in the beta amyloid plaque accumulation characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest a possible role for caffeine in AD treatment. The latest evidence linking beta amyloid protein to Alzheimer's disease and exploring the relationship between caffeine and beta amyloid are featured in a review article in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

The adverse health effects caused by fine particles have been known for some time. In addition, ultrafine particles appear to play a significant role in cardiac function - even if an individual is exposed to these for only a few minutes, as scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München have now been able to show. [More]
Broad Institute expands collaboration with Bayer to develop new cardiovascular therapies

Broad Institute expands collaboration with Bayer to develop new cardiovascular therapies

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have expanded their collaboration with Bayer HealthCare to include cardiovascular genomics and drug discovery. The goal of this new part of the alliance is to leverage insights from human genetics to help create new cardiovascular therapies. [More]
Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

A new study shows that workplace wellness programs can be effective in helping people lose weight by providing healthier food choices and increasing opportunities for physical activity, particularly if these efforts are designed with the input and active participation of employees. [More]
Investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may alleviate certain menopause symptoms

Investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may alleviate certain menopause symptoms

The investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may be a viable agent to alleviate certain menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes, according to a new peer-reviewed article in the March Journal of Women's Health. [More]
Canadian Task Force issues new guidelines to prevent, manage childhood obesity

Canadian Task Force issues new guidelines to prevent, manage childhood obesity

Today the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care issued its latest guidelines on the prevention and management of childhood obesity. With 1 in 3 children classified as either overweight or obese in Canada the prevalence of childhood obesity has more than doubled in the last 40 years. [More]
First global model for predicting CVD risk

First global model for predicting CVD risk

Researchers have developed the first global model for predicting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The model—developed by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Imperial College London, and colleagues—will be of particular help to public health professionals, clinicians, and patients in developing countries for prevention of CVD. [More]
Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues in the Netherlands evaluated the relationship between nutritional conditions in very early life and adult health, and found that famine exposure during the first pregnancy trimester was associated with increases in mortality from a variety of causes other than cancer or cardiovascular disease. [More]
Public volunteers to highlight their role in improving care for patients at Sheffield Consumers in Research event

Public volunteers to highlight their role in improving care for patients at Sheffield Consumers in Research event

RESEARCH-active members of the public are to showcase how their vital work helps shape clinical research projects and improves care for patients at a free drop-in event in Sheffield City Centre on Wednesday 22 April. [More]
New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

For the first time, scientists have developed a new risk score that can predict the 10-year risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke in persons aged 40 years or older in any world country. [More]
GFT505 demonstrates dose-dependent efficacy on primary endpoint in phase 2 NASH trial

GFT505 demonstrates dose-dependent efficacy on primary endpoint in phase 2 NASH trial

GENFIT, today announces topline results of the phase 2 GOLDEN-505 trial in NASH. Due to the unexpected rate of resolution of NASH in patients randomized to placebo who had early NASH (NAS of 3, placebo response rate>57%), along with the high number of sites for a limited sample size, the study as initially designed did not enable the trial to meet directly the primary endpoint. [More]
C3BS plans to open new U.S.-based facility to manufacture C-Cure for use in Phase III trial

C3BS plans to open new U.S.-based facility to manufacture C-Cure for use in Phase III trial

Cardio3 BioSciences, a leader in the discovery and development of engineered cell therapies, today confirmed plans to open a new U.S.-based manufacturing facility in Rochester, Minnesota. The facility will support the Company’s current and anticipated manufacturing needs in the United States for both the Phase III clinical trial evaluating lead cardiovascular product candidate C-Cure (CHART-2), and its recently acquired CAR T-cell therapies’ portfolio. [More]
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
Migraine headaches with auras may increase risk of stroke

Migraine headaches with auras may increase risk of stroke

People who suffer migraine headaches with auras are at roughly double the risk of suffering the most common type of stroke. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
TxCell to present at upcoming US and French investment conferences

TxCell to present at upcoming US and French investment conferences

Damian Marron, CEO, TxCell, will present at the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine's 3rd Annual Regen Med Investor Day, New York, March 25, 2015. In addition, Damian Marron will also participate at the Portzamparc PEA-PME Forum, Paris, April 1, 2015. [More]
Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients' quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [More]
Low zinc levels in older adults correspond with increased chronic inflammation

Low zinc levels in older adults correspond with increased chronic inflammation

Zinc, an important mineral in human health, appears to affect how the immune system responds to stimulation, especially inflammation, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today positive results from a Phase 1 study with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx. In this study, healthy volunteers treated with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx achieved dose-dependent, statistically significant reductions in angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) of up to 93 percent with a mean reduction of up to 84 percent from baseline (p<0.001). [More]
Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen today announced that an application seeking marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) for the treatment of high cholesterol has been submitted for review to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan. [More]
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