Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
VCOR project aims to improve coronary angioplasty services in Victoria

VCOR project aims to improve coronary angioplasty services in Victoria

Victorian Hospitals will be better equipped to measure the quality of care for their cardiac patients, under a new project that collects and compares data on coronary angioplasty practice. [More]
Oats play important role in human health

Oats play important role in human health

According to a new, wide-reaching collection of scientific reviews published in the October 2014 supplement issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, oats may play an important role in improving satiety, diet quality and digestive, cardiovascular and general metabolic health. [More]
UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

UMass Amherst epidemiologist investigates risk of early menopause

The estimated 10 percent of women in Western nations who enter menopause before age 45 have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as lower fertility. Now epidemiologist Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is conducting the first large study to investigate whether vitamin D deficiency, inflammatory factors, hormones and other factors are associated with risk of early menopause, funded by NIH. [More]
Dartmouth College reveals first-ever sensor that detects secondhand smoke in real time

Dartmouth College reveals first-ever sensor that detects secondhand smoke in real time

Dartmouth College researchers are going to market with the first-ever sensor that detects secondhand and thirdhand tobacco and marijuana smoke in real time. [More]
Study finds that mental health disorders double heart disease, stroke risks

Study finds that mental health disorders double heart disease, stroke risks

People facing mental health challenges are significantly more likely to have heart disease or stroke, according to a study presented today at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes. [More]
Insulin resistance linked to treatment-refractory bipolar disorder

Insulin resistance linked to treatment-refractory bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder who are insulin resistant are likely to also be refractory to mood-stabilising treatment, report researchers. [More]
Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

Marital hostility, history of depression can increase obesity risk in adults

The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research. [More]
Crown Bioscience announces U.S. expansion with new translational oncology center

Crown Bioscience announces U.S. expansion with new translational oncology center

Crown Bioscience, Inc., a leading global drug discovery and development service company, has announced the opening of the Crown Bioscience US Research Center to be located at the David H. Murdock Research Institute (DHMRI), in Kannapolis, N.C. The new center, which will open in the 3rd quarter of 2014, represents significant U.S. market expansion for Crown. [More]
Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

As part of its commitment to innovation and improving patient outcomes, Boston Scientific Corporation has initiated the PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate the clinical performance of the Promus PREMIER Everolimus-Eluting Platinum Chromium Coronary Stent System in underserved patient populations, including women and people of color. [More]
Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. [More]
Scientists identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

Scientists identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

University of Utah scientists have identified two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation, a discovery that one day may help researchers prevent certain fatal or debilitating conditions before they start. [More]
Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Parental understanding regarding daily experiences may affect adolescent health, well-being

Adolescents whose parents better understand their daily experiences have better psychological adjustment, suggests a study in the October issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Researchers identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

Researchers identify two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation

University of Utah scientists have identified two microRNA molecules that control chronic inflammation, a discovery that one day may help researchers prevent certain fatal or debilitating conditions before they start. [More]
UCSF study: Smoking takes $18.1 billion toll in California

UCSF study: Smoking takes $18.1 billion toll in California

Smoking took an $18.1 billion toll in California – $487 for each resident – and was responsible for more than one in seven deaths in the state, more than from AIDS, influenza, diabetes or many other causes, according to the first comprehensive analysis in more than a decade on the financial and health impacts of tobacco. [More]
Use of electronic health care services to improve cardiovascular health in China

Use of electronic health care services to improve cardiovascular health in China

The use of electronic health care services (versus more traditional methods) to reduce the high incidence of heart disease in China will be debated by leading cardiologists from around the world in Beijing, from 16 to 19 October 2014. [More]
Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Reducing heart failure deaths: an interview with Dimitrios Georgiopoulos, UK Medical Director, Novartis

Heart failure is a debilitating, and life-threatening, condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood around the body. When heart failure continues to progress and worsen over time, the persistent condition is known as chronic heart failure. [More]
Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Associated with various types of cancer such as skin and liver, the intake of arsenic it is also linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. According to a long-term research conducted by experts from the Center for Research and Advanced Studies it was determined that this metalloid inhibits enzymes associated with antioxidant protection. [More]
Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women who are treated for high blood pressure are not given the same medication as men, nor do they hit the treatment targets as often, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg. [More]