Cardiovascular Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiovascular Disease News and Research

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 700,000 people die annually of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease involves the heart and vessels and is the number one killer in the U.S. accounting for nearly 30-percent of all deaths. Cardiovascular disease has a number of forms but the most common are myocardial infarction and angina pectoris which affect the heart itself. There are well known environmental risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as smoking, diet, inactivity and increased alcohol use. Heredity also plays a factor in cardiovascular disease since other risk factors like high blood pressure and high LDL cholesterol tend to run in families. Cardiovascular disease can be reduced by controlling environmental factors and understanding the genetic factors that put people at greater risk for heart disease.
Resverlogix, Emerald Logic complete collaborative research program

Resverlogix, Emerald Logic complete collaborative research program

Resverlogix Corp. today announced that it has completed a collaborative research program with Emerald Logic, a leader in quantitative analytics. Using Fast Collective Evolution Technology (FACET), Emerald Logic analyzed Resverlogix's complete clinical dataset including all measurements obtained from each of 798 patients who participated in the Company's Phase 2 clinical trials ASSERT, SUSTAIN and ASSURE. [More]
Reducing premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases: an interview with Dr Shanthi Mendis, WHO

Reducing premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases: an interview with Dr Shanthi Mendis, WHO

The main types of NCD are cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. These have been identified as the principal conditions for three main reasons. One is that, collectively, they contribute the most to the total disease burden. [More]
Salt may help control infection

Salt may help control infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and in Germany have found that sodium - salt - accumulates in the skin and tissue in humans and mice to help control infection. [More]
Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

A recent study published in the American Journal of Hypertension has found that body mass index (BMI) in healthy adolescents has a statistically significant association with both systolic blood pressures (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), and highlights the significance of the global trend of rapidly increasing adolescent obesity. [More]
Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Cardiovascular risks of severe pediatric obesity, assessed among adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study, were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in women often presents with different types of symptoms than in men and can be challenging to diagnose due to a variety of factors. A national panel of experts convened to review the latest evidence regarding CAD in women, diagnostic approaches, and new types of tests and technologies. [More]
Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

Peanuts may lower risk of deaths from heart disease

If you're looking for a simple way to lower your risk of dying from a heart attack, consider going nuts. [More]
Study debunks false reports surrounding risk of hormone therapy

Study debunks false reports surrounding risk of hormone therapy

For over a decade, hormone therapy (HT) has been a hot topic in medicine. Unfortunately, women are still confused and concerned about using HT after two federally-funded studies linked HT to potentially serious health risks. [More]
Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external modifications to the DNA that turn genes "on" or "off". [More]
Study: Two in every three Australian smokers more likely to die from their habit

Study: Two in every three Australian smokers more likely to die from their habit

The research, published today in the international journal BMC Medicine, is an important reminder about the extreme hazards of smoking. [More]
Ninety percent of patients at risk of CHD fail to receive statins

Ninety percent of patients at risk of CHD fail to receive statins

The study, published in Current Medical Research and Opinion, provides the first ever real-world view of the treatment landscape for patients at risk of CHD[1], with a sample of two million patients. But the results paint a bleak picture of prescribing patterns with the majority not being given the potentially life saving drug. [More]
Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. [More]
New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

A new medical device which combines nanotechnology with a pregnancy tester could help diagnose and treat the 1 million people in the UK who don’t know they have kidney disease, a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers reveals today. [More]
Psoriasis management: an interview with Dr Sandy McBride

Psoriasis management: an interview with Dr Sandy McBride

A major challenge around treating psoriasis is communication - psoriasis can flare and resolve in between appointments so it can be difficult to express and describe the life impact of these flares and recall possible triggers and response to treatments. People with psoriasis can also find it very difficult to talk about their emotions – something known as alexithymia – again making it difficult for clinicians to fully appreciate the impact of psoriasis. [More]
People who use snus are at increased risk of developing alcohol dependency

People who use snus are at increased risk of developing alcohol dependency

People who use snus run twice the risk of developing alcohol dependency compared with non-users, and the more one uses snus, the higher the risk. This has been found in a study from Umeå University which was published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. [More]
Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness - and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes - said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Eli Lilly accepts committee recommendation to extend evacetrapib Phase 3 trial

Eli Lilly accepts committee recommendation to extend evacetrapib Phase 3 trial

Eli Lilly and Company has accepted the recommendation of the ACCELERATE study academic executive committee, based on emerging science in the cardiovascular field, to extend the Phase 3 trial of the investigational medicine evacetrapib by approximately six months. [More]
Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Widely considered simply a malodorous toxic gas, hydrogen sulfide is now being studied for its probable role in regulating blood pressure, according to researchers. [More]