Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
Women who undergo uterine fibroid embolization experience improved sexual function

Women who undergo uterine fibroid embolization experience improved sexual function

Women who underwent a nonsurgical, image-guided treatment, uterine fibroid embolization (UFE), for the treatment of uterine fibroids experienced improved sexual function and a higher overall quality of life. The research, part of a French multicenter study, presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting, also found the vast majority of women treated with UFE sustained improvement for more than a year. [More]
Loyola to conduct clinical trial of new procedure to treat atrial fibrillation

Loyola to conduct clinical trial of new procedure to treat atrial fibrillation

Loyola Medicine is enrolling patients in a landmark clinical trial of a new procedure to treat atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat. [More]
Mount Sinai Hospital uses M1 LUMI Bead loaded with doxorubicin for liver cancer treatment

Mount Sinai Hospital uses M1 LUMI Bead loaded with doxorubicin for liver cancer treatment

An innovative cancer treatment made of luminescent chemotherapy-filled beads injected into tumors through the wrist is now available for patients with inoperable and difficult-to-treat liver cancer. [More]
N-KICS tool helps describe intensity of nursing care for children with CMC

N-KICS tool helps describe intensity of nursing care for children with CMC

Recent medical advances have resulted in increased survival of children with complex medical conditions (CMC), such as cerebral palsy, complex chromosomal anomalies, major congenital heart diseases and respiratory disease. [More]
Study suggests need for better strategy to reduce fatalities after non-surgical treatment for blocked arteries

Study suggests need for better strategy to reduce fatalities after non-surgical treatment for blocked arteries

Despite the successful adoption of modern techniques, new research from the Universities of Keele and Manchester suggests more can be done to reduce fatalities following a non-surgical treatment for blocked arteries. [More]
Report: Patients still experience CLABSIs and CAUTIs in U.S. hospitals

Report: Patients still experience CLABSIs and CAUTIs in U.S. hospitals

Though hospitals are making strides in avoiding central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), a report released today, in the midst of Patient Safety Awareness Week (March 13-19), shows patients are still experiencing these serious, and sometimes fatal, infections too frequently. [More]
Paroxysmal AF patients who practice yoga have better quality of life

Paroxysmal AF patients who practice yoga have better quality of life

Yoga improves quality of life in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, according to research published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. Heart rate and blood pressure also decreased in patients who did yoga. [More]
Valley Hospital to evaluate potential new treatment alternative for AFib patients

Valley Hospital to evaluate potential new treatment alternative for AFib patients

The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, is one of 15 U.S. sites currently enrolling patients in a research study to evaluate a potential new treatment alternative for patients with symptomatic persistent and long standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AFib). [More]
Impact of central catheter maintenance bundle on central line-associated bloodstream infections

Impact of central catheter maintenance bundle on central line-associated bloodstream infections

A central catheter maintenance bundle developed to prevent a common healthcare-associated infection had an immediate effect of decreasing rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections, according to a study in the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

UAB researchers focus on five key areas to improve care of CVD patients

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year — that's one in every four deaths. The impact of cardiovascular diseases is quite large. [More]
CHLA cardiologists perform rare fetal cardiac intervention procedure

CHLA cardiologists perform rare fetal cardiac intervention procedure

Last August, when Children's Hospital Los Angeles cardiologists confirmed that the heart of a 27-week-old fetus suffered from a critical cardiac condition that prevented blood returning from the fetus's lungs from circulating back into the body, they told the parents that their child faced certain open-heart surgery after birth. Even worse, babies born with this very rare condition—hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) with restrictive atrial septum—have a 50 percent neonatal mortality rate. [More]
Ohio State study evaluates trans-catheter interatrial shunt device for diastolic heart failure

Ohio State study evaluates trans-catheter interatrial shunt device for diastolic heart failure

For the first time in the U.S., a clinical trial is underway that's evaluating a device designed to treat diastolic heart failure. The first patient enrolled in the randomized, blinded study is being treated at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. [More]
Cardiac clot-busting drug decreases mortality in hemorrhagic stroke patients

Cardiac clot-busting drug decreases mortality in hemorrhagic stroke patients

Reporting on the results of a phase III international clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Medicine physicians say use of a cardiac clot-busting drug to treat strokes that cause brain bleeding safely decreased the death rate in patients by 10 percent, compared to a control group receiving saline. [More]
Pitt experts lead gene therapy clinical trial in Parkinson's disease patients

Pitt experts lead gene therapy clinical trial in Parkinson's disease patients

Experts at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are leading the second arm of a clinical trial using gene therapy to relieve the symptoms of tremor and mobility impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease. [More]
Stenting and surgery equally effective at lowering long-term risk of stroke

Stenting and surgery equally effective at lowering long-term risk of stroke

Investigators for the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial found that stenting and surgery are equally effective at lowering the long-term risk of stroke from a narrowed carotid artery, according to a study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Clot-busting drugs decrease mortality in one of worst forms of hemorrhagic stroke

Clot-busting drugs decrease mortality in one of worst forms of hemorrhagic stroke

The use of clot-busting drugs to clear blood from the brain's ventricles may be the first effective strategy to decrease mortality for a type of catastrophic bleeding stroke, according to phase-3 clinical trial results announced Thursday at the International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles. [More]
Long-term survival of 'blue babies' and patients with congenital heart defects reasonably good

Long-term survival of 'blue babies' and patients with congenital heart defects reasonably good

Over 90 percent of those operated on for congenital heart defects as children, for example, due to blue baby syndrome, are alive 20 years post-surgery. A new doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has explored this issue. [More]

First two patients treated in multi-center clinical trial for perivascular renal denervation

Ablative Solutions, Inc. (ASI), a privately held company headquartered in Kalamazoo, MI, with offices in Palo Alto, CA, announced today that Professors Wojtek Wojakowski and Mariusz Hochul have treated the first two patients in the European Peregrine Post-Market Study. [More]
Vascular surgery safer than stenting for older patients with carotid stenosis

Vascular surgery safer than stenting for older patients with carotid stenosis

Vascular surgery appears to be safer than stenting for patients over 70 years of age with carotid stenosis, or a blockage of the carotid arteries in the neck, according to new findings published today in the Lancet. [More]
Ultrasound-activated microbubbles help preserve healthy heart tissue

Ultrasound-activated microbubbles help preserve healthy heart tissue

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering used ultrasound-activated microbubbles to improve preservation of heart muscle and function in a pig heart attack model. [More]
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