Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
Stem cell therapy may benefit patients with debilitating heart failure

Stem cell therapy may benefit patients with debilitating heart failure

Researchers want to know whether patients with debilitating heart failure can benefit by having their own stem cells injected into their ailing heart muscle. [More]
Hepatitis C drug fuels cost debate

Hepatitis C drug fuels cost debate

A panel of experts said this week that the drug represents a "low value" to the health system because of its cost. [More]
First Edition: March 12, 2014

First Edition: March 12, 2014

Today's headlines include stories about the Obama administration's latest tallies regarding how many Americans have signed up for Obamacare coverage and the outcome of a Florida special election that was marked by health law themes. [More]
CSI's new Diamondback Peripheral 60cm systems receive FDA clearance for PAD treatment

CSI's new Diamondback Peripheral 60cm systems receive FDA clearance for PAD treatment

Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., announced today it has received FDA clearance of its new Diamondback 360 60cm Peripheral Orbital Atherectomy Systems (OAS) for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). [More]
Researcher wins grant from NCI to continue developing new therapy for bladder cancer

Researcher wins grant from NCI to continue developing new therapy for bladder cancer

A biomedical engineering researcher at the University of Arkansas will use a $416,897 grant from the National Cancer Institute to continue developing a new therapy for bladder cancer. [More]

Cincinnati joins with children's hospitals to affirm critical role patient families play in making hospital stays

As National Patient Safety Awareness Week kicks off (March 2 - 8, 2014) Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is joining forces with children's hospitals around the country to affirm the critical role patient families play in making hospital stays as safe as possible for their children. [More]
Report highlights benefits of different access approach to treat uterine fibroids

Report highlights benefits of different access approach to treat uterine fibroids

Interventional radiologists have devised a new way to access a woman's fibroids-by flipping her wrist and treating via an arm not groin artery-to nonsurgically shrink noncancerous growths in the muscular wall of the uterus. Researchers found this to be less painful and traumatic for women, allowing them to immediately sit up and move after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE)-with no overnight stay, according to a March article in the Society of Interventional Radiology's flagship publication, the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. [More]

Long-term risks of deep vein thrombosis

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) often brings with it the risk of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), an under-recognized but serious complication that often causes long-term disability for patients. During March's DVT Awareness Month, the Society of Interventional Radiology wants to help patients and family members to better understand the long-term risks of DVT. [More]

Loyola surgeon successfully performs operation on patient suffering from rare disorder

Jarely Sanchez is an affectionate, energetic little girl who loves ballet. "Everyone she meets, she connects with," said her father, Jose Angel Ulloa. "She's like a magnet." But for more than a week, the three-year-old girl wasn't herself. [More]

Doctors devise new way to treat atrial fibrillation

Doctors in the U.S. and Japan have devised a way to treat atrial fibrillation by adding a little alcohol to minimally invasive therapies that target a cluster of misbehaving nerves known to trigger arrhythmia. In the most recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology (online before print), the researchers say the new therapy may dull or stop the transmission of electrical impulses that cause atrial fibrillation. [More]

Dendreon plans to make PROVENGE available in Europe

Dendreon Corporation today announced that it plans to make PROVENGE (autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated with PAP-GM-CSF or sipuleucel-T) available in Europe, beginning with Germany and the United Kingdom. [More]

Loyola University Medical Center offers new high-tech catheter device for treating atrial fibrillation

Loyola University Medical Center is the first hospital in Illinois to offer a new high-tech catheter device that can improve outcomes of patients treated for atrial fibrillation, the most common irregular heartbeat. [More]
Simple change in hospital laboratory reports may improve antibiotic prescribing practices

Simple change in hospital laboratory reports may improve antibiotic prescribing practices

A simple change in how the hospital laboratory reports test results may help improve antibiotic prescribing practices and patient safety, according to a pilot, proof-of-concept study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online. [More]

Scientific Statement details latest evidence for diagnosis and treatment of fibromuscular dysplasia

A vascular disease called fibromuscular dysplasia, which can cause high blood pressure, kidney failure, stroke and other symptoms -- mostly in women -- is "poorly understood by many healthcare providers," according to a Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association. [More]

Implants made of nickel-titanium alloy are not dangerous to health, shows study

Jena (Germany) A trousers button, a coin or a watch can be dangerous for people with a nickel allergy. Approximately 1 in 10 Germans is allergic to the metal. [More]
NIH-funded session in Bethesda to heighten awareness of underactive bladder

NIH-funded session in Bethesda to heighten awareness of underactive bladder

Underactive bladder, estimated to affect more than 20 percent of the elderly population, is an unrecognized disease that has a major influence on the health and independence of seniors. [More]

Viewpoints: 'Sham Surgery' for research; bigger hospitals may not bring better care

In a landmark study of a new cardiovascular device unveiled last month, patients received anesthetics, had a large-bore catheter inserted through a cut into one of their major arteries, and had dye injected into their bloodstream. [More]
UH Case Medical Center cardiologists perform TAVR procedure under twilight

UH Case Medical Center cardiologists perform TAVR procedure under twilight

University Hospitals Case Medical Center cardiologists Marco Costa, MD, and Dan Simon, MD, are among the first in the country to perform transaortic valve replacements (TAVR) while the patient is in a "twilight" sedation, awake and communicating with them during the procedure. [More]

AlloMap test can be used to assess risk of dysfunction or rejection of a transplanted heart

A new UCLA-led study shows that a blood test commonly used to determine whether heart transplant recipients are rejecting their new organ can also predict potential rejection-related problems in the future. [More]

Researchers develop catheter-based device that provides 3-D imaging from inside heart, blood vessels

Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart, and potentially allow more of patients' clogged arteries to be cleared without major surgery. [More]