Catheter News and Research RSS Feed - Catheter News and Research

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters . In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.
TVA Medical announces results from multicenter clinical study of everlinQ endoAVF System

TVA Medical announces results from multicenter clinical study of everlinQ endoAVF System

TVA Medical, Inc., announced clinical trial results from a prospective, multicenter clinical study evaluating the everlinQ endoAVF System. This innovative medical technology creates hemodialysis access using vascular sites not traditionally used by surgeons for people with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). [More]
New injectable 'biogel' may become new weapon against cancer

New injectable 'biogel' may become new weapon against cancer

A new injectable "biogel" is effective in delivering anti-cancer agents directly into cancerous tumours and killing them. This technology, developed by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, has already been successfully tested in the laboratory. If it works in patients, the therapy could one day revolutionize treatment for many forms of cancer. [More]
Cardiologists successfully use virtual reality device to treat chronically blocked right coronary artery

Cardiologists successfully use virtual reality device to treat chronically blocked right coronary artery

Virtual reality (VR) has potential to revolutionize some aspects of medicine and healthcare. Several medical specialties are already using it to train physicians and assist diagnosis and it also has potential for treatment. A group of cardiologists has now successfully used a VR device to guide the opening up (revascularization) of a chronically blocked right coronary artery. [More]
AHRQ releases new toolkit to help prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitals

AHRQ releases new toolkit to help prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitals

As part of its ongoing efforts to make health care safer, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality today released a new toolkit to help hospitals prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). [More]
Certain antibiotic treatment for MRSA may potentially make patients sicker

Certain antibiotic treatment for MRSA may potentially make patients sicker

A new study sheds light on how treatment of the "superbug" known as MRSA with certain antibiotics can potentially make patients sicker. The findings by Cedars-Sinai scientists, published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, could have implications for managing the bug, a virulent form of the common staph infection that can be difficult to control. [More]
Boston Scientific signs definitive agreement to acquire CeloNova's interventional radiology business

Boston Scientific signs definitive agreement to acquire CeloNova's interventional radiology business

Boston Scientific has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the interventional radiology portfolio of CeloNova Biosciences, a San Antonio-based developer of endovascular and interventional cardiology technologies. [More]
Gastric balloon in a pill helps patients lose weight without surgery or endoscopy

Gastric balloon in a pill helps patients lose weight without surgery or endoscopy

A new gastric balloon that can be swallowed like a pill and then filled while in the stomach, helped patients lose more than 37 percent of their excess weight over four months, according to new research presented here at ObesityWeek 2015, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. The weeklong conference is hosted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) and The Obesity Society (TOS). [More]
ReDy receives CE clearance for third-generation Renal Denervation System

ReDy receives CE clearance for third-generation Renal Denervation System

Renal Dynamics' third-generation Renal Denervation System received CE clearance and is now commercially available in Europe for treatment of Resistant Hypertension. The ReDy Renal Denervation System is based on a novel multi-electrode ablation technology that delivers a pre-determined RF ablation set with a single positioning. [More]
Northeastern University researchers create 3-D printing technology to develop patient-specific products

Northeastern University researchers create 3-D printing technology to develop patient-specific products

A team of researchers at Northeastern University has developed an innovative 3-D printing technology that uses magnetic fields to shape composite materials--mixes of plastics and ceramics--into patient-specific products. The biomedical devices they are developing will be both stronger and lighter than current models and, with their customized design, ensure an appropriate fit. [More]
UAB performs life-saving TAVR procedure on Selma resident

UAB performs life-saving TAVR procedure on Selma resident

In the late 1990s, Earnest Tate was named the first black police chief of Selma, Alabama. Nearly 20 years later, Tate is retired and works on his family farm in the city where he made history. [More]
Miriam Hospital enrolling local participants for Parachute implant clinical trial to treat heart failure

Miriam Hospital enrolling local participants for Parachute implant clinical trial to treat heart failure

The Miriam Hospital is actively recruiting local participants for a U.S. clinical trial of the Parachute device for treating heart failure. The study is focused on determining if the new minimally invasive catheter-based device can slow the progression of heart failure, reduce repeat hospitalizations and death, and significantly improve quality of life for patients who experience enlargement of the left ventricle after a heart attack. [More]
Patients who take cholesterol medications before endovascular surgery experience better outcomes

Patients who take cholesterol medications before endovascular surgery experience better outcomes

Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is one of the most dramatic medical emergencies a person can face. It usually strikes without warning, killing approximately 50 percent of those who experience it before they reach a hospital. Of those who do get to a health facility alive, only about 50 percent survive. [More]
New heart-powered pacemakers may be on the horizon

New heart-powered pacemakers may be on the horizon

The implantable pacemaker, a medical marvel that has extended millions of lives since its invention nearly 60 years ago, is getting a 21st century makeover. [More]
Liposomal sizing and the Coulter principle: an interview with Professor Melvin E. Klegerman

Liposomal sizing and the Coulter principle: an interview with Professor Melvin E. Klegerman

For about the last 25 years, the cardiology group here have been developing a platform technology for both the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis. The group began at Northwestern University, Chicago, under the direction of Dr. David McPherson and he continues to lead the group. [More]
Noninvasive CT scans far better than stress tests at spotting clogged arteries

Noninvasive CT scans far better than stress tests at spotting clogged arteries

Results of a head-to-head comparison study led by Johns Hopkins researchers show that noninvasive CT scans of the heart's vessels are far better at spotting clogged arteries that can trigger a heart attack than the commonly prescribed exercise stress that most patients with chest pain undergo. [More]
Hospi introduces Macy Catheter Tray at ACEP annual meeting

Hospi introduces Macy Catheter Tray at ACEP annual meeting

Hospi Corporation, a patient-centric medical device company, today introduced the Macy Catheter Tray, designed to enable rapid administration of medications or fluids to patients when intravenous (IV) or oral administration is difficult. The Macy Catheter is designed to provide a bridge or alternative to IV access, to decrease hospital admissions and to facilitate discharge of patients. [More]
FDA approves Yondelis (trabectedin) for treatment of specific soft tissue sarcomas

FDA approves Yondelis (trabectedin) for treatment of specific soft tissue sarcomas

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Yondelis (trabectedin), a chemotherapy, for the treatment of specific soft tissue sarcomas (STS) – liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma – that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or is advanced (metastatic). [More]

Intense education program can reduce use of indwelling urinary catheters in MICU setting

Many hospitalized patients have an indwelling urinary catheter (IUC), and previous studies have found up to one-third of IUCs are unneeded. A team of researchers from Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York, implemented an intervention that decreased the use of IUCs in patients from 92.3 percent to just 15 percent, representing a 77.3 percent reduction in use. [More]
Pioneering surgical technique restores hand and arm movement to quadriplegic patients

Pioneering surgical technique restores hand and arm movement to quadriplegic patients

A pioneering surgical technique has restored some hand and arm movement to patients immobilized by spinal cord injuries in the neck, reports a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
FDA grants 12-year exclusivity to RUCONEST (C1 esterase inhibitor [recombinant])

FDA grants 12-year exclusivity to RUCONEST (C1 esterase inhibitor [recombinant])

Salix Pharmaceuticals and Pharming Group NV announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted 12 years of exclusivity to RUCONEST (C1 esterase inhibitor [recombinant]) 50 IU/kg. [More]
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