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Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

In a surprise finding, researchers working with breast cancer cells purchased at the same time from the same cell bank discovered that the cells responded differently to chemicals, even though the researchers had not detected any difference when they tested them for authenticity at the time of purchase. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
Scientists discover improved method for large scale production of human stem cells

Scientists discover improved method for large scale production of human stem cells

Scientists have discovered a new method of creating human stem cells which could solve the big problem of the large-scale production needed to fully realise the potential of these remarkable cells for understanding and treating disease. [More]
Research on Flattop protein could provide starting point for regenerative diabetes therapies

Research on Flattop protein could provide starting point for regenerative diabetes therapies

The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. [More]
International project to develop globally accessible bank of new cancer cell models for research

International project to develop globally accessible bank of new cancer cell models for research

An international project to develop a large, globally accessible bank of new cancer cell culture models for the research community launched today. [More]
Scientists discover new mechanism by which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens

Scientists discover new mechanism by which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens

Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), a messenger substance in the immune system, plays an important role in triggering chronic inflammatory diseases. For this reason, TNF inhibitors are a standard form of treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and certain inflammatory bowel diseases. [More]
Mussels inspire scientists to attach biologically active molecule to titanium surface

Mussels inspire scientists to attach biologically active molecule to titanium surface

Titanium is used medically in applications such as artificial joints and dental implants. While it is strong and is not harmful to tissues, the metal lacks some of the beneficial biological properties of natural tissues such as bones and natural teeth. [More]
New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

In a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
Researchers reveal novel mechanism by which viral protein VII suppresses immune alarm signals

Researchers reveal novel mechanism by which viral protein VII suppresses immune alarm signals

Viruses must avoid a host's immune system to establish successful infections—and scientists have discovered another tool that viruses use to frustrate host defenses. [More]
KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. [More]
Novel method uses lasers to carve paths inside biocompatible gels

Novel method uses lasers to carve paths inside biocompatible gels

Future medicine is bound to include extensive tissue-engineering technologies such as organs-on-chips and organoids - miniature organs grown from stem cells. But all this is predicated on a simple yet challenging task: controlling cellular behavior in three dimensions. [More]
Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at the Babraham Institute have found a way to replicate one of the earliest changes in Alzheimer's disease in a dish. This means that it should now be possible to find out a lot more about why it happens - and how to stop it. The new findings are published in the journal Molecular Neurodegeneration and supported by the charity Alzheimer's Research UK. [More]
New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease

New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease

Much of the research on Alzheimer's disease has focused on the amyloid beta protein, which clumps together into sticky fibrils that form deposits in the brains of people with the disease. [More]
Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

By watching brightly glowing HIV-infected immune cells move within mice, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shown how infected immune cells latch onto an uninfected sister cell to directly transmit newly minted viral particles. [More]
New mathematical model helps examine metabolism of breast epithelium

New mathematical model helps examine metabolism of breast epithelium

Researchers have built a model to investigate the metastasis of cancer by examining the metabolism of breast epithelial cells and look at the role of signaling. This research, published in PLOS Computational Biology, may contribute to the development of cell specific anti-cancer interventions. [More]
Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

Study establishes copper’s role in fat metabolism

A new study is further burnishing copper's reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology. A research team led by a scientist at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that copper plays a key role in metabolizing fat. [More]
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