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CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment

CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment

An international team of researchers who discovered a new gene disorder that causes severe childhood epilepsy leveraged that finding to reduce seizures in two children. [More]
BUAP researchers develop biomaterial that can be printed in 3D for regenerating bone tissue

BUAP researchers develop biomaterial that can be printed in 3D for regenerating bone tissue

Researchers at the Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP) developed a biomaterial with the ability to serve as a support for regenerating bone tissue, which is biodegradable and can be printed in 3D with controlled porosity. [More]
New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials. [More]
JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin

JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin

Osteoporosis particularly affects elderly women: the bone's structure weakens and the risk of suffering fractures rises. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
Researchers find better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells

Researchers find better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells

A research team including developmental biologist Stephen A. Duncan, D. Phil., SmartState Chair of Regenerative Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina, has found a better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). [More]
Skin cells derived from autistic donors grow faster than those from control subjects

Skin cells derived from autistic donors grow faster than those from control subjects

Brain cells grow faster in children with some forms of autism due to distinct changes in core cell signaling patterns, according to research from the laboratory of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD, chair of the department of genetics and genome sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO has introduced Cultrex Organoid Progenitor Cells that have been derived from normal, healthy mouse small intestine tissue and are continuously cultured using Reduced Growth Factor BME R1 and BME 2. [More]
Scientists discover less invasive, cheaper technique to improve woman's chances of becoming pregnant

Scientists discover less invasive, cheaper technique to improve woman's chances of becoming pregnant

For those facing infertility, IVF has long been the established option to have a baby. Now Australian and Belgian medical scientists have discovered how to improve a woman's chances of becoming pregnant using a less invasive and cheaper alternative. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Experts suggest leaky gut syndrome could be cause for stomach problems among Olympic competitors

Experts suggest leaky gut syndrome could be cause for stomach problems among Olympic competitors

A number of competitors at the Rio Olympics have reported stomach problems. Team GB officials have denied that athletes have fallen victim to food poisoning at the Olympic athletes' village in Rio, despite a number complaining of upset stomachs. [More]
Researchers uncover one way breast cancer tumors resist vital medication

Researchers uncover one way breast cancer tumors resist vital medication

A team of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine cancer researchers has uncovered one way certain tumors resist vital medication. [More]
New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

When in dysfunction, the vascular endothelium -- the tissue that lines the blood vessels throughout our body's entire circulatory system -- plays a big role in the development of many human diseases, including diabetes, stroke, heart disease, viral infections and cancer. [More]
Bio-Rad expands product line by launching two human recombinant antigens

Bio-Rad expands product line by launching two human recombinant antigens

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc., a global provider of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of two human recombinant antigens, expanding the company's portfolio of Critical Raw Materials for the in vitro diagnostics market. [More]

Tecan introduces Spark 20M multimode microplate reader for drug discovery or life science research

Tecan has launched the Spark 20M multimode microplate reader, offering tailor-made solutions to suit virtually any drug discovery or advanced life science research application. [More]
Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

In a surprise finding, researchers working with breast cancer cells purchased at the same time from the same cell bank discovered that the cells responded differently to chemicals, even though the researchers had not detected any difference when they tested them for authenticity at the time of purchase. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
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