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Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Metabolic characteristics of CRPC may open new avenues for treatment

Metabolic characteristics of CRPC may open new avenues for treatment

Advanced prostate cancer is usually treated by removing androgen, the male hormone that helps it grow. Although initially effective, this treatment often leads to the tumor becoming castration resistant- a lethal condition. [More]
High quality exosome research products

High quality exosome research products

AMSBIO has introduced a wide selection of new high quality products for exosome research. Formulated to be quick, affordable and easy to use, AMSBIO's new expanded suite of quantification kits, isolation tools, standards, DNA & RNA extraction kits, antibodies and cell culture reagents will facilitate your understanding of exosomes using a wide variety of samples. [More]
WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

Cell therapies for a range of serious conditions, including heart attacks, diabetes, and traumatic injuries, will be accelerated by research at Worcester Polytechnic Institute that yielded a newly patented method of converting human skin cells into engines of wound healing and tissue regeneration. [More]
Real-time intracellular oxygen assay

Real-time intracellular oxygen assay

AMSBIO has introduced MitoXpress® Intra, a novel intracellular oxygen assay based on a 96 or 384-well fluorescence plate reader-based approach that facilitates the real-time assessment of transient changes in cell respiration, oxygen gradients and physiological responses across a range of cell models. [More]
New bio-mimicry method allows scientists to track cells in vivo using MRI during preclinical, clinical trials

New bio-mimicry method allows scientists to track cells in vivo using MRI during preclinical, clinical trials

Researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University Professor of Biological Sciences Chien Ho have developed a new method for preparing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that not only leads to the production of more native stem cells, but also labels them with a FDA approved iron-oxide nanoparticle (Ferumoxytol). [More]
Scientists prove effectiveness of gene editing system in eliminating HIV from DNA of CD4+ T-cells

Scientists prove effectiveness of gene editing system in eliminating HIV from DNA of CD4+ T-cells

In 2014, a team of researchers in the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University became the first to successfully eliminate the HIV-1 virus from cultured human cells. [More]
Synthetic heart valve one step closer to reality

Synthetic heart valve one step closer to reality

The quest for a synthetic heart valve that faithfully mimics the original is a step closer to its goal with the Rice University find that a natural polymer called hyaluronan, one of the chief components of skin and connective tissue, can serve as a versatile template for growing spongiosa, the middle tissue layer in the valve's leaflets. [More]
Combination of two compounds found in red grapes, oranges could treat diseases

Combination of two compounds found in red grapes, oranges could treat diseases

A combination of two compounds found in red grapes and oranges could be used to improve the health of people with diabetes, and reduce cases of obesity and heart disease. [More]
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can have low-level effects on oxidative stress genes

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can have low-level effects on oxidative stress genes

A nanoparticle commonly used in food, cosmetics, sunscreen and other products can have subtle effects on the activity of genes expressing enzymes that address oxidative stress inside two types of cells. [More]
Profiling gamma-retrovirus integration sites may help identify genes linked to specific cancer types

Profiling gamma-retrovirus integration sites may help identify genes linked to specific cancer types

Identifying the sites where gamma-retroviruses commonly insert into the genome may help to identify genes associated with specific cancer types, according to a study published April 20, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kathryn Gilroy at the University of Glasgow, UK, and colleagues. [More]
Importance of understanding ovarian cancer on molecular level

Importance of understanding ovarian cancer on molecular level

Nearly 70 percent of ovarian cancer cases are detected after metastasis, which is the development of secondary malignant growths distant from the primary site of cancer. [More]
BioTek to present new technologies for cell-based applications at analytica 2016

BioTek to present new technologies for cell-based applications at analytica 2016

BioTek will present two opportunities for researchers to learn about new instruments and approaches to simplify their workflow at analytica 2016, the 25th International Trade Fair for Laboratory Technology, Analysis, Biotechnology and analytica conference. [More]
Olympus launches new CKX-CCSW cell confluency checker software

Olympus launches new CKX-CCSW cell confluency checker software

Accurate cell confluency measurements are now quick to perform on cell cultures with the Olympus CKX-CCSW confluency checker software. Without having to remove cells from the vessel, the software quantifies the exact growth density to quickly help scientists decide on the next step and optimise cultivation conditions. [More]
New method may help identify small amounts of nanomaterials in environment samples

New method may help identify small amounts of nanomaterials in environment samples

It is still unclear what the impact is on humans, animals and plants of synthetic nanomaterials released into the environment or used in products. It's very difficult to detect these nanomaterials in the environment since the concentrations are so low and the particles so small. Now the partners in the NanoUmwelt project have developed a method that is capable of identifying even minute amounts of nanomaterials in environmental samples. [More]
Elusive brain receptor may play vital role in death of neurons from neurological diseases

Elusive brain receptor may play vital role in death of neurons from neurological diseases

Strokes, seizures, traumatic brain injury and schizophrenia: these conditions can cause persistent, widespread acidity around neurons in the brain. But exactly how that acidity affects brain function isn't well understood. [More]
International researchers make crucial discovery on formation, growth of blood vessels

International researchers make crucial discovery on formation, growth of blood vessels

As blood vessels grow, the cells that compose them must make a choice between forming side-branches or expanding the vessel surface and increasing its diameter. Now Prof. Holger Gerhardt at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in the Helmholtz Association and his international research teams have made a crucial disovery about this process: the cells can behave as a collective, moving in the same direction together. [More]
Beckman Coulter Life Sciences to unveil Vi-CELL MetaFLEX for bioprocessing market at INTERPHEX 2016

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences to unveil Vi-CELL MetaFLEX for bioprocessing market at INTERPHEX 2016

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences will unveil a fast, low sample volume bioanalyte analyzer, the Vi-CELL MetaFLEX, at INTERPHEX 2016. This year’s event, showcasing pharmaceutical and bioprocessing innovation, is being held in the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York, April 26-28 2016. [More]
Lab-grown mini-brains shed light on health crisis posed by Zika virus in fetal brains

Lab-grown mini-brains shed light on health crisis posed by Zika virus in fetal brains

Studying a new type of pinhead-size, lab-grown brain made with technology first suggested by three high school students, Johns Hopkins researchers have confirmed a key way in which Zika virus causes microcephaly and other damage in fetal brains: by infecting specialized stem cells that build its outer layer, the cortex. [More]
Drugs that block NOTCH signaling in many cancers could be effective against ACC

Drugs that block NOTCH signaling in many cancers could be effective against ACC

Using a novel cell culture approach, Yale Cancer Center researchers have discovered critical vulnerabilities in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), a rare and lethal glandular cancer with a high recurrence rate and few treatment options. [More]
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