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AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO introduces Organoid Progenitor Cells for use in gene editing techniques

AMSBIO has introduced Cultrex Organoid Progenitor Cells that have been derived from normal, healthy mouse small intestine tissue and are continuously cultured using Reduced Growth Factor BME R1 and BME 2. [More]
Scientists discover less invasive, cheaper technique to improve woman's chances of becoming pregnant

Scientists discover less invasive, cheaper technique to improve woman's chances of becoming pregnant

For those facing infertility, IVF has long been the established option to have a baby. Now Australian and Belgian medical scientists have discovered how to improve a woman's chances of becoming pregnant using a less invasive and cheaper alternative. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Tulane professor receives three-year grant to improve survival of mesenchymal stem cells

Kim O'Connor, a professor in Tulane University's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients. [More]
Experts suggest leaky gut syndrome could be cause for stomach problems among Olympic competitors

Experts suggest leaky gut syndrome could be cause for stomach problems among Olympic competitors

A number of competitors at the Rio Olympics have reported stomach problems. Team GB officials have denied that athletes have fallen victim to food poisoning at the Olympic athletes' village in Rio, despite a number complaining of upset stomachs. [More]
Researchers uncover one way breast cancer tumors resist vital medication

Researchers uncover one way breast cancer tumors resist vital medication

A team of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine cancer researchers has uncovered one way certain tumors resist vital medication. [More]
New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

When in dysfunction, the vascular endothelium -- the tissue that lines the blood vessels throughout our body's entire circulatory system -- plays a big role in the development of many human diseases, including diabetes, stroke, heart disease, viral infections and cancer. [More]
Bio-Rad expands product line by launching two human recombinant antigens

Bio-Rad expands product line by launching two human recombinant antigens

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc., a global provider of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of two human recombinant antigens, expanding the company's portfolio of Critical Raw Materials for the in vitro diagnostics market. [More]

Tecan introduces Spark 20M multimode microplate reader for drug discovery or life science research

Tecan has launched the Spark 20M multimode microplate reader, offering tailor-made solutions to suit virtually any drug discovery or advanced life science research application. [More]
Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

Researchers find genetic variability in frozen vials of cells purchased from same cell bank

In a surprise finding, researchers working with breast cancer cells purchased at the same time from the same cell bank discovered that the cells responded differently to chemicals, even though the researchers had not detected any difference when they tested them for authenticity at the time of purchase. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
Scientists discover improved method for large scale production of human stem cells

Scientists discover improved method for large scale production of human stem cells

Scientists have discovered a new method of creating human stem cells which could solve the big problem of the large-scale production needed to fully realise the potential of these remarkable cells for understanding and treating disease. [More]
Research on Flattop protein could provide starting point for regenerative diabetes therapies

Research on Flattop protein could provide starting point for regenerative diabetes therapies

The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. [More]
International project to develop globally accessible bank of new cancer cell models for research

International project to develop globally accessible bank of new cancer cell models for research

An international project to develop a large, globally accessible bank of new cancer cell culture models for the research community launched today. [More]
Scientists discover new mechanism by which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens

Scientists discover new mechanism by which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens

Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), a messenger substance in the immune system, plays an important role in triggering chronic inflammatory diseases. For this reason, TNF inhibitors are a standard form of treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and certain inflammatory bowel diseases. [More]
Mussels inspire scientists to attach biologically active molecule to titanium surface

Mussels inspire scientists to attach biologically active molecule to titanium surface

Titanium is used medically in applications such as artificial joints and dental implants. While it is strong and is not harmful to tissues, the metal lacks some of the beneficial biological properties of natural tissues such as bones and natural teeth. [More]
New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

In a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. [More]
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