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Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Body builders have it right: vitamin E does help build strong muscles, and scientists appear to have figured out one important way it does it. [More]
E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

Certain flavorings used in electronic cigarette liquid may alter important cellular functions in lung tissue, according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]

ZenBio, Inc. introduces GroPro™ Cell Culture Growth Supplement formulated 
to replace Bovine serum

ZenBio, Inc. industry leader in robust cell-based solutions, announced today the worldwide release of a new GroPro Cell Culture Growth Supplement... [More]
FDA licenses Protein Sciences' Pearl River, NY facility to manufacture Flublok influenza vaccine

FDA licenses Protein Sciences' Pearl River, NY facility to manufacture Flublok influenza vaccine

Protein Sciences Corporation announced that on May 12, 2015 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration licensed its Pearl River, NY manufacturing facility for the commercial manufacturing of Flublok influenza vaccine. Flublok is the world's first licensed influenza vaccine made using modern recombinant technology. [More]
New study discovers master switch that drives heart cell maturation process

New study discovers master switch that drives heart cell maturation process

A molecular switch that seems to be essential for embryonic heart cells to grow into more mature, adult-like heart cells has been discovered. [More]
Panacea Pharmaceuticals selects Goodwin to complete novel vaccine Fill / Finish project

Panacea Pharmaceuticals selects Goodwin to complete novel vaccine Fill / Finish project

Goodwin Biotechnology, Inc., a biological Contract Development and Manufacturing Organization that specializes in bioprocess development and GMP manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals utilizing Mammalian Cell Culture expression systems and Bioconjugation technologies, was selected by Panacea Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to complete a novel Fill / Finish project, as well as Quality Control release and stability testing for a therapeutic, nanoparticle cancer vaccine based on the Human Aspartyl (Asparaginyl) β-Hydroxylase (HAAH) tumor-specific protein to support Phase I clinical trials in patients with various solid tumor cancers. [More]
Quantitative phosphoproteomic approach to identify targeted cancer therapy

Quantitative phosphoproteomic approach to identify targeted cancer therapy

Winner of the Louise Eisenhardt Traveling Scholarship Award, Teresa Purzner, MD, presented her research, Quantitative Phosphoproteomics for Targeted Cancer Therapy. [More]
Protein Sciences, CTH@H to provide Flublok vaccine to home health and hospice agencies in Connecticut

Protein Sciences, CTH@H to provide Flublok vaccine to home health and hospice agencies in Connecticut

Protein Sciences Corporation, along with The Connecticut Association for Healthcare at Home, announced a new partnership today that will bring Flublok influenza vaccine to home health and hospice agencies across the state. As a new affinity partner of CTH@H, Protein Sciences will make Flublok available to CTH@H member agencies for the 2015/16 flu season. [More]
CMC Biologics to supply bulk drug substance for Emergent BioSolutions' IXINITY

CMC Biologics to supply bulk drug substance for Emergent BioSolutions' IXINITY

CMC Biologics, Inc., a global CMO dedicated to process development and production of biopharmaceuticals for clinical and commercial use, today announced that it will supply bulk drug substance for Emergent BioSolutions' recently FDA-approved product, IXINITY® [coagulation factor IX (recombinant)]. [More]
Kallistem achieves complete human spermatogenesis in vitro for treatment of male infertility

Kallistem achieves complete human spermatogenesis in vitro for treatment of male infertility

Kallistem, which develops innovative cell culture technologies in reproductive biology, today announces a world first: human spermatogenesis in vitro. At the end of 2014 the company was able to produce fully formed human spermatozoa in the laboratory setting, using patient testicular biopsies containing only immature germ cells, or spermatogonia. [More]
Promising compound blocks production of beta amyloid peptides in Alzheimer's mouse model

Promising compound blocks production of beta amyloid peptides in Alzheimer's mouse model

Offering a potential early intervention for Alzheimer's disease (AD), researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Cenna Biosciences, Inc. have identified compounds that block the production of beta amyloid peptides in mice. [More]
Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Ahmad M. Khalil, PhD, knew the odds were against him -- as in thousands upon thousands to one. Yet he and his team never wavered from their quest to identify the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. This month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Khalil and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University proved the power of persistence; from a pool of more than 30,000 possibilities, they found 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread. [More]
Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency - long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers - can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. [More]
SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found how a widely known but little-studied enzyme protects brain cells in models of Parkinson's disease. [More]
New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought. [More]
Fraunhofer researchers develop cell-free substrate made of advanced fibers

Fraunhofer researchers develop cell-free substrate made of advanced fibers

Regenerative medicine uses cells harvested from the patient's own body to heal damaged tissue. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a cell-free substrate containing proteins to which autologous cells bind and grow only after implantation. [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

Treatments to regenerate skin from burns become tedious and long lasting; however, Mexican researchers developed a biodegradable membrane that allows to transfer skin cells (keratinocytes) to burn wounds, when placed on the wound. The method reduces healing time by 50 percent. [More]
Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes, a sub-class of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that developed from the genome's 20,000 protein-coding genes but lost the ability to produce proteins, have long been considered nothing more than genomic "junk." Yet the retention of these 20,000 mysterious remnants during evolution has suggested that they may in fact possess biological functions and contribute to the development of disease. [More]
Penn Med's BLINKER Team named one of 16 finalists in NIH 'Follow that Cell Challenge'

Penn Med's BLINKER Team named one of 16 finalists in NIH 'Follow that Cell Challenge'

James Eberwine, PhD, the Elmer Holmes Bobst Professor of Systems Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was named one of 16 finalists in the first phase of the Follow that Cell Challenge funded by the National Institutes of Health. The competition was run by crowdsourcing company Innocentive and 687 designated "solvers" entered initially. [More]
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