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Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency - long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers - can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. [More]
SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

SGK1 enzyme protects brain cells in animal models of Parkinson's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found how a widely known but little-studied enzyme protects brain cells in models of Parkinson's disease. [More]
New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought. [More]
Fraunhofer researchers develop cell-free substrate made of advanced fibers

Fraunhofer researchers develop cell-free substrate made of advanced fibers

Regenerative medicine uses cells harvested from the patient's own body to heal damaged tissue. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a cell-free substrate containing proteins to which autologous cells bind and grow only after implantation. [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

New biodegradable membrane reduces wound healing time by 50%

Treatments to regenerate skin from burns become tedious and long lasting; however, Mexican researchers developed a biodegradable membrane that allows to transfer skin cells (keratinocytes) to burn wounds, when placed on the wound. The method reduces healing time by 50 percent. [More]
Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes, a sub-class of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that developed from the genome's 20,000 protein-coding genes but lost the ability to produce proteins, have long been considered nothing more than genomic "junk." Yet the retention of these 20,000 mysterious remnants during evolution has suggested that they may in fact possess biological functions and contribute to the development of disease. [More]
Penn Med's BLINKER Team named one of 16 finalists in NIH 'Follow that Cell Challenge'

Penn Med's BLINKER Team named one of 16 finalists in NIH 'Follow that Cell Challenge'

James Eberwine, PhD, the Elmer Holmes Bobst Professor of Systems Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was named one of 16 finalists in the first phase of the Follow that Cell Challenge funded by the National Institutes of Health. The competition was run by crowdsourcing company Innocentive and 687 designated "solvers" entered initially. [More]
Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

For the first time, a research team, led by a UC San Francisco biologist, has isolated energy-burning "beige" fat from adult humans, which is known to be able to convert unhealthy white fat into healthy brown fat. The scientists also found new genetic markers of this beige fat. [More]
Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen receives FDA priority review designation for Kyprolis to treat relapsed multiple myeloma

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) of Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) for Injection for the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
3D respiratory tissue model shown to be effective for measuring impact of chemicals

3D respiratory tissue model shown to be effective for measuring impact of chemicals

A 3-dimensional model of human respiratory tissue has been shown to be an effective platform for measuring the impact of chemicals, like those found in cigarette smoke, or other aerosols on the lung. [More]
New study reveals how cells sort out loops meant to encode microRNAs

New study reveals how cells sort out loops meant to encode microRNAs

Just as two DNA strands naturally arrange themselves into a helix, DNA's molecular cousin RNA can form hairpin-like loops. But unlike DNA, which has a single job, RNA can play many parts -- including acting as a precursor for small molecules that block the activity of genes. These small RNA molecules must be trimmed from long hairpin-loop structures, raising a question: How do cells know which RNA loops need to be processed this way and which don't? [More]
Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen today announced that an application seeking marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) for the treatment of high cholesterol has been submitted for review to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan. [More]
Olive ingredients may prevent Alzheimer's disease

Olive ingredients may prevent Alzheimer's disease

It has long been proven that people who follow a Mediterranean diet and keep physically and mentally active are less likely to suffer from dementia. Olives in particular appear to play a key role in this regard. But just what are the substances contained in these small, oval fruit that are so valuable? This is what a Hessen-based group of researchers from the Goethe University Frankfurt, the Technical University of Darmstadt and Darmstadt company N-Zyme BioTec GmbH intends to find out. The three-year project "NeurOliv" has a project volume of 1.3 million Euros and is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research as part of the high-tech initiative "KMU-innovativ Biochance". [More]
Life Science Leader recognizes CMC Biologics for quality, reliability for third consecutive year

Life Science Leader recognizes CMC Biologics for quality, reliability for third consecutive year

CMC Biologics, Inc., a leading global contract manufacturing organization known for technical excellence and customer satisfaction in biopharmaceutical development and commercial manufacture of protein-based therapeutics, was recognized for the third consecutive year for quality and reliability by Life Science Leader at an awards ceremony at DCAT Week '15 in New York. [More]

Scientists examine how substances at low concentrations may impact human health

A public and scientific discussion is currently taking place focusing on the question whether substances at low concentrations may lead to health impairments in humans. For this reason, an increasing number of experimental studies to test such effects are currently conducted using different chemicals. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
Organ-on-a-chip could replace use of animals to test drugs for safety and efficacy

Organ-on-a-chip could replace use of animals to test drugs for safety and efficacy

When University of California, Berkeley, bioengineers say they are holding their hearts in the palms of their hands, they are not talking about emotional vulnerability. [More]
Xylem’s YSI biochemistry analyzer is effective tool for cell culture and cancer research

Xylem’s YSI biochemistry analyzer is effective tool for cell culture and cancer research

Specifically for oncology drug development applications, the YSI 2950 biochemistry analyzer is used to measure analytes such as glucose, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, providing a simple, automated analysis of bioprocess cell culture samples, with accurate results in less than a minute. [More]
Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

A research team from The Scripps Research Institute, Mayo Clinic and other institutions has identified a new class of drugs that in animal models dramatically slows the aging process—alleviating symptoms of frailty, improving cardiac function and extending a healthy lifespan. [More]
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