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Study shows inactivation of p53 protein promotes cancer progression

Study shows inactivation of p53 protein promotes cancer progression

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University of Barcelona have discovered the interaction between HERC2 proteins with another protein called p53 that is inactivated in more than half of human tumors. [More]
TAZ represents a novel therapeutic target in NSCLC

TAZ represents a novel therapeutic target in NSCLC

Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer who express high levels of transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif may be a clinically distinct subgroup with an unfavourable prognosis, researchers report. [More]
Citalopram can increase efficacy of BMSCs differentiating into neuronal-like cells

Citalopram can increase efficacy of BMSCs differentiating into neuronal-like cells

There is evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. [More]
Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has the ability to integrate into the human genome, making it extremely difficult to cure the infection. A new study by scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that when HIV integrates into genes involved with cancer, these cells tend to reproduce to a greater extent than others HIV-infected cells. [More]
New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

A new theory of how cancer works could lead to the next generation of treatments of the disease. The theory suggests that cancer forms when recently evolved genes are damaged, and cells have to revert to using older, inappropriate genetic pathways. [More]
New knowledge may expand treatments for patients with lung cancer

New knowledge may expand treatments for patients with lung cancer

Studying the most common type of lung cancer, researchers have uncovered mutations in a cell-signaling pathway that plays a role in forming tumors. [More]
NANOG gene linked to tumours derived from stratified epithelia

NANOG gene linked to tumours derived from stratified epithelia

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered that NANOG, an essential gene for embryonic stem cells, also regulates cell division in stratified epithelia-those that form part of the epidermis of the skin or cover the oesophagus or the vagina-in adult organisms. [More]
TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. [More]
Skin cells possess olfactory receptor for sandalwood scent

Skin cells possess olfactory receptor for sandalwood scent

Skin cells possess an olfactory receptor for sandalwood scent, as researchers at the Ruhr-Universit-t Bochum have discovered. [More]
Bayer announces Health Canada approval of Nexavar for differentiated thyroid cancer treatment

Bayer announces Health Canada approval of Nexavar for differentiated thyroid cancer treatment

Bayer Inc. is pleased to announce the Health Canada approval of Nexavar for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic, progressive, differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI). [More]
Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

A team of scientists from Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute has found that the loss of a protein called p62 in the cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can enhance the growth and progression of tumors. [More]
New approach may help develop more effective immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma

New approach may help develop more effective immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma

A new approach demonstrated that the recognition of unique cancer mutations appeared to be responsible for complete cancer regressions in two metastatic melanoma patients treated with a type of immunotherapy called adoptive T-cell therapy. [More]
UCLA study sheds light on the development of lung cancer

UCLA study sheds light on the development of lung cancer

UCLA researchers led by Dr. Brigitte Gomperts have discovered the inner workings of the process thought to be the first stage in the development of lung cancer. Their study explains how factors that regulate the growth of adult stem cells that repair tissue in the lungs can lead to the formation of precancerous lesions. [More]
Yap1 oncogene drives recurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer

Yap1 oncogene drives recurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer tumors addicted to mutant Kras signaling for their growth and progression have a ready-made substitute to tap if they're ever forced to go cold-turkey on the mutant oncogene, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cell. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues

Researchers identify new mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues

A team of researchers led by David J. Mooney, Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, have identified a possible mechanism by which normal cells turn malignant in mammary epithelial tissues, the tissues frequently involved in breast cancer. [More]
Celsion signs definitive asset purchase agreement to acquire EGEN

Celsion signs definitive asset purchase agreement to acquire EGEN

Celsion Corporation (Celsion) (NASDAQ: CLSN), an oncology drug development company, and EGEN, Inc. (EGEN), a privately-held biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of nucleic acid-based therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and other difficult to treat diseases, today announced the signing of a definitive asset purchase agreement in which Celsion will acquire substantially all of the assets of EGEN, including its Phase Ib DNA-based immunotherapy product candidate EGEN-001 and its therapeutic platform technologies, TheraPlas™ for delivery of DNA and mRNA, TheraSilence™ for delivery of RNA, and RAST™ for Cell Enabled Expression and Secretion of RNA. [More]
Tissue-engineered medical devices: an interview with Anna Wynn, Business Development Manager, Instron

Tissue-engineered medical devices: an interview with Anna Wynn, Business Development Manager, Instron

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (TERM) are dedicated to creating new tissue-engineered medical devices that replace and/or enhance tissue function that has been impaired by disease, injury, or age. [More]
Duke researchers identify first piece of new brain-repair circuit

Duke researchers identify first piece of new brain-repair circuit

Duke researchers have found a new type of neuron in the adult brain that is capable of telling stem cells to make more new neurons. Though the experiments are in their early stages, the finding opens the tantalizing possibility that the brain may be able to repair itself from within. [More]
Study reveals how BTK mutation triggers drug resistance in CLL patients

Study reveals how BTK mutation triggers drug resistance in CLL patients

A multi-institutional team of researchers has pinpointed exactly what goes wrong when chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients develop resistance to ibrutinib, a highly effective, precisely targeted anti-cancer drug. [More]
Commonly used diabetes medications may also have positive effects against cancer cell proliferation

Commonly used diabetes medications may also have positive effects against cancer cell proliferation

One of the most commonly used medications to control diabetes may also have positive effects against cancer cell proliferation, as show in research done at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV) in Mexico. [More]