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Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Researchers have designed a nanoparticle-based therapy that is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. [More]
New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
OSU researchers find promising approach to treating epithelial cancer

OSU researchers find promising approach to treating epithelial cancer

Researchers at Oregon State University are pursuing a new concept in treatment of epithelial cancer, especially head and neck cancer, by using two promising "analogs" of an old compound that was once studied as a potent anti-tumor agent, but long ago abandoned because it was too toxic. [More]
E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

Certain flavorings used in electronic cigarette liquid may alter important cellular functions in lung tissue, according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Researchers identify three genes involved in choroid plexus carcinoma

Researchers identify three genes involved in choroid plexus carcinoma

Researchers have identified three genes that play a pivotal role in the brain tumor choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC), a discovery that lays the groundwork for more effective treatment of this rare, often fatal cancer. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

A new study links a father's age at birth to the risk that his child will develop blood and immune system cancers as an adult, particularly for only children. The study, which appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found no association between having an older mother and these cancers. [More]
Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has uncovered a big clue to how bacteria may promote some colon cancers. [More]
Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff University scientists have developed a novel anti-cancer stem cell agent capable of targeting aggressive tumour forming cells common to breast, pancreas, colon and prostate cancers. [More]
New study shows ulcer-causing bacteria can directly interact with stomach stem cells

New study shows ulcer-causing bacteria can directly interact with stomach stem cells

The ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori can directly interact with stomach stem cells, causing the cells to divide more rapidly, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
Therapeutic candidate BLU-554 has significant anti-tumor activity in HCC models

Therapeutic candidate BLU-554 has significant anti-tumor activity in HCC models

Blueprint Medicines today announced new preclinical data demonstrating that BLU-554, a selective and potent inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4), has significant anti-tumor activity in models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that are dependent on FGFR4 signaling. [More]
Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Ahmad M. Khalil, PhD, knew the odds were against him -- as in thousands upon thousands to one. Yet he and his team never wavered from their quest to identify the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. This month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Khalil and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University proved the power of persistence; from a pool of more than 30,000 possibilities, they found 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread. [More]
Honokiol extract holds promise as adjunct treatment for bladder and kidney cancers

Honokiol extract holds promise as adjunct treatment for bladder and kidney cancers

The botanical extract honokiol, a biologically active molecule isolated from the bark of Magnolia spp., holds promise as an adjunct treatment for aggressive bladder and kidney cancers, as reported in two new studies. New research on honokiol in bladder cancer was presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015. [More]
Novel treatment strategy targets treatment-resistant CML

Novel treatment strategy targets treatment-resistant CML

Researchers have shown that the coiled-coil mimetic CCmut3 can inhibit cell growth and promote apoptosis in cell lines expressing BCR–ABL1, including those resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. [More]
Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) may be effective for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) data presented yesterday by Pharmacyclics, Inc. at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting suggest that ibrutinib may be an effective therapeutic option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), as shown in both a transgenic mouse model and an in-vivo model of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mice (grafts of tissue taken from a pancreatic cancer patient and grafted into a mouse). [More]
Nanomedicine strategy can help reduce heart attacks, strokes

Nanomedicine strategy can help reduce heart attacks, strokes

A research team showed that a nanotherapeutic medicine can halt the growth of artery plaque cells resulting in the fast reduction of the inflammation that may cause a heart attack, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published April 3 in Science Advances. [More]
Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes, a sub-class of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that developed from the genome's 20,000 protein-coding genes but lost the ability to produce proteins, have long been considered nothing more than genomic "junk." Yet the retention of these 20,000 mysterious remnants during evolution has suggested that they may in fact possess biological functions and contribute to the development of disease. [More]
Researchers pinpoint molecular mechanisms that inhibit Hippo pathway in pediatric bone cancers

Researchers pinpoint molecular mechanisms that inhibit Hippo pathway in pediatric bone cancers

A particular molecular pathway permits stem cells in pediatric bone cancers to grow rapidly and aggressively, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center. [More]
Researchers uncover relationship between two proteins linked to cerebral cavernous malformations

Researchers uncover relationship between two proteins linked to cerebral cavernous malformations

Researchers have uncovered new details about the relationship between two proteins associated with the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations, a little understood neurovascular disorder. [More]
TSRI scientists identify enzyme that maintains healthy periods of inactivity in HSCs to prevent anemia

TSRI scientists identify enzyme that maintains healthy periods of inactivity in HSCs to prevent anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time—and for good reason. When stem cells become too active and divide too often, they risk acquiring cell damage and mutations. In the case of blood stem cells (also called hematopoietic stem cells or HSCs), this can lead to blood cancers, a loss of blood cells and an impaired ability to fight disease. [More]
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