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Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

New research findings published in the February 2016 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that a new therapeutic strategy for HIV may already be available by repurposing an existing prescription drug. [More]
MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

MYB-QKI fusion gene that drives pediatric low-grade gliomas poses a triple threat

Oncology researchers have discovered that an abnormal fused gene that drives pediatric brain tumors poses a triple threat, operating simultaneously through three distinct biological mechanisms—the first such example in cancer biology. [More]
Biochemical compound demonstrates increasing potential for use in cancer imaging

Biochemical compound demonstrates increasing potential for use in cancer imaging

In the paper, an international team reviewed studies conducted over the past 30 years on a particular tracer, called “18F-FLT,” and found that it has the potential to improve diagnostic imaging, and thus treatment, of some cancers. [More]
Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

Study provides vital information about mechanisms governing DNA repair

DNA damage can lead to gene inactivation or deregulation and cause various diseases such as cancer; however, many DNA repair mechanisms allow cells to survive against such damage. A study lead by Antoine Simoneau of the laboratory of Dr. Hugo Wurtele, a researcher in immunology-oncology at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (CIUSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, and recently published in the prestigious journal Nucleic Acids Research, provides valuable information about certain mechanisms governing DNA repair. [More]
Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

Sphingosine kinase inhibitor slows castration-resistant prostate cancer cell growth

A first-in-class sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitor slowed the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, in part by inhibiting the enzyme dihydroceramide desaturase (DEGS), but did not kill them, according to the results of preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies published in the December 2015 issue of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and others. [More]
CU Cancer Center study finds distinct genetic drivers of colorectal cancer in younger and older patients

CU Cancer Center study finds distinct genetic drivers of colorectal cancer in younger and older patients

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study being presented Saturday at the 2016 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium shows genetic differences between colorectal cancer (CRC) in young and old patients, possibly pointing toward different treatments and strategies in combating the young form of the disease. [More]
Researchers identify cause of rare syndrome consistent with Fanconi Anemia

Researchers identify cause of rare syndrome consistent with Fanconi Anemia

An international team of researchers has established the cause of rare syndrome consistent with Fanconi Anemia: a de novo mutation in a so called RAD51 gene, which is responsible for repairing damages in the DNA. [More]
Combination therapy can help overcome endocrine resistance in women with advanced breast cancer

Combination therapy can help overcome endocrine resistance in women with advanced breast cancer

Data collected in Japanese and Korean patients included in the global PALOMA3 trial provides evidence that combining palbociclib with fulvestrant is an effective strategy to overcome endocrine resistance in women with hormone receptor positive (HR+), HER2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer. [More]
UB study traces how enigmatic molecules help cancer self-destruct

UB study traces how enigmatic molecules help cancer self-destruct

You've probably never heard of "sphingolipids" before. But these curiously named organic compounds play a vital role in one of humanity's most well-known diseases: cancer. [More]
UCA researchers identify compounds that favour generation of new neuronal cells

UCA researchers identify compounds that favour generation of new neuronal cells

Many neurology pathologies cause irreversible loss of neurons. They are mostly the so-called neurodegenerative diseases although there exist other causes for a focal loss of neurons, as it is the case in strokes or traumatic brain injuries. All these pathologies lack nowadays of an efficient treatment not being possible to regenerate dead neurons. In fact, although the brain has the ability to regenerate as many studies has proved, this regeneration is very low, ranging from 0.2% to a maximum of 10% depending on the type of injury and the damaged area. [More]
Study sheds new light on the causes of autism

Study sheds new light on the causes of autism

Evidence of autism may be found in the composition and malfunction of the brain's blood vessels, a team of scientists has found. Their research sheds new light on the causes of autism, which previously had pointed to neurological make-up rather than to the vascular system, and identifies a new target for potential therapeutic intervention. [More]
Study paves way for development of novel cancer therapeutics

Study paves way for development of novel cancer therapeutics

A team of scientists, comprising researchers from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, a research institute under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, and the VIB Laboratory of Molecular Cancer Biology, has revealed the mechanism by which tumor cells elevate levels of MDM4, a protein that is highly expressed in cancer cells but not in normal adult tissues. [More]
VCU Massey Cancer Center scientists reveal signaling process that leads to excessive growth of cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center scientists reveal signaling process that leads to excessive growth of cancer

The gene p53 has been described as the "guardian of the genome" due to its prominent role in preventing genetic mutations. More than half of all cancers are thought to originate from p53 mutations or loss of function, and now a recent study by VCU Massey Cancer Center scientist Richard Moran, Ph.D., explains why. [More]
Researchers discover novel way to enhance, restore cancer suppressor activity in B-ALL

Researchers discover novel way to enhance, restore cancer suppressor activity in B-ALL

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, working with Chinese and American colleagues, have discovered a novel way to enhance and restore cancer suppressor activity in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, resulting in better outcomes in a pre-clinical model of the disease. The finding could pave the way for a new class of drugs for this and other forms of leukemia. [More]
Liver protein aids in accelerating growth of insulin-producing pancreatic 'beta' cells

Liver protein aids in accelerating growth of insulin-producing pancreatic 'beta' cells

More than a quarter of the 30 million people with diabetes in the United States depend on daily injections of insulin to maintain their blood glucose levels in a healthy range. Scientists are investigating many techniques to help treat or potentially even cure many of these patients by increasing the body's own insulin-producing pancreatic "beta" cells. [More]
TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

Members of the TET (short for ten-eleven translocation) family have been known to function as tumor suppressors for many years, but how they keep a lid on the uncontrolled cell proliferation of cancer cells had remained uncertain. Now, researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology demonstrate that TET proteins collectively constitute a major class of tumor suppressors and are required to maintain genome instability. [More]
Researchers reveal new technique to grow human hepatocytes in the laboratory

Researchers reveal new technique to grow human hepatocytes in the laboratory

In new research appearing in the prestigious journal Nature Biotechnology, an international research team led by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem describes a new technique for growing human hepatocytes in the laboratory. This groundbreaking development could help advance a variety of liver-related research and applications, from studying drug toxicity to creating bio-artificial liver support for patients awaiting transplantations. [More]
Research findings may lead to potential therapeutic target for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

Research findings may lead to potential therapeutic target for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have shown that a pathogen-sensing molecule plays a vital role in keeping gastrointestinal (GI) systems healthy. [More]
Study reveals why colorectal cancer still returns in some patients after treatment

Study reveals why colorectal cancer still returns in some patients after treatment

Cetuximab, marketed as Erbitux, is one of the key therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer. Yet the cancer still returns in some patients, shortening overall survival. [More]
Presence of connexin proteins suppresses primary tumor growth

Presence of connexin proteins suppresses primary tumor growth

How does a protein called connexin put the clamps on cancer? Researchers in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio today reported an explanation. [More]
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