Cell Proliferation News and Research RSS Feed - Cell Proliferation News and Research

Researchers discover that cell's skeleton can trigger cell multiplication

Researchers discover that cell's skeleton can trigger cell multiplication

A research team from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC; Portugal), led by Florence Janody, in collaboration with Nicolas Tapon from London Research Institute (LRI; UK), discovered that the cell's skeleton can trigger the multiplication of cells through the action of proteins that control cellular rigidity. [More]
New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. The disease, always fatal, has a survival rate of only 6-18 months. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Working with cells taken from children with a very rare but ferocious form of brain cancer, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified a genetic pathway that acts as a master regulator of thousands of other genes and may spur cancer cell growth and resistance to anticancer treatment. [More]
Rigel, Bristol-Myers Squibb partner to develop, commercialize TGF beta receptor kinase inhibitors

Rigel, Bristol-Myers Squibb partner to develop, commercialize TGF beta receptor kinase inhibitors

Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that they have entered into a collaboration agreement for the discovery, development and commercialization of cancer immunotherapies based on Rigel's extensive portfolio of small molecule TGF beta receptor kinase inhibitors. [More]
Research findings could someday lead to new treatments for patients with autism and cancer

Research findings could someday lead to new treatments for patients with autism and cancer

In recent years, scientists have found a surprising a connection between some people with autism and certain cancer patients: They have mutations in the same gene, one that codes for a protein critical for normal cellular health. Now scientists have reported in the ACS journal Biochemistry that the defects reduce the activity and stability of the protein. [More]
Combination therapies may overcome resistance to targeted cancer drugs

Combination therapies may overcome resistance to targeted cancer drugs

A protein called YAP, which drives the growth of organs during development and regulates their size in adulthood, plays a key role in the emergence of resistance to targeted cancer therapies, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Salicylates drugs reduce proliferation, viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. [More]
Study provides common model of cellular ageing

Study provides common model of cellular ageing

Researchers at the BBSRC-supported Babraham Institute have mapped the physical structure of the nuclear landscape in unprecedented detail to understand changes in genomic interactions occurring in cell senescence and ageing. Their findings have allowed them to reconcile the contradictory observations of two current models of ageing: cellular senescence of connective tissue cells called fibroblasts and cellular models of an accelerated ageing syndrome. [More]
Researchers one step closer to identifying how lung cancer cells metastasize

Researchers one step closer to identifying how lung cancer cells metastasize

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer, and it is estimated that more than 159,000 people in the United States died from the disease last year. Most of these deaths were because the cancer had spread to other organ sites. Following their recent discovery of a protein pathway, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are one step closer to understanding how lung cancer cells metastasize. [More]
Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a non-healing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations. [More]
Sanford-Burnham researchers use human pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

Sanford-Burnham researchers use human pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

In a new study from Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss. In the United States alone, more than 40 million men and 21 million women are affected by hair loss. [More]
TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic compound that sharply inhibits the activity of a protein that plays an important role in in the progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. [More]
New opportunity for developing simple test to measure E2F4 activity in ER+ breast cancer patients

New opportunity for developing simple test to measure E2F4 activity in ER+ breast cancer patients

By looking at the expression levels of downstream genes of the regulators in breast cancer, investigators at Dartmouth Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, led by Chao Cheng, PhD, have identified a gene signature in E2F4 that is predictive of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. [More]
Next generation sequencing in malignant pleural mesothelioma tumors reveals complex mutational setting

Next generation sequencing in malignant pleural mesothelioma tumors reveals complex mutational setting

Next generation sequencing in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors shows a complex mutational setting with a high number of genetic alterations in genes involved in DNA repair, cell survival and cell proliferation pathways. Increased accumulation of mutations correlates with early progression of the tumor and decreased survival. [More]
Mirati begins dosage in MGCD265 Phase 1b clinical trial for NSCLC

Mirati begins dosage in MGCD265 Phase 1b clinical trial for NSCLC

Mirati Therapeutics, Inc. today announced that the first patient with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) has been dosed in a Phase 1b clinical trial of MGCD265 in selected patients exhibiting genetic alterations of MET or Axl. [More]
Chromosome X microduplications implicated in infancy-onset gigantism

Chromosome X microduplications implicated in infancy-onset gigantism

Researchers report that heritable microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 may underlie a “striking” form of gigantism with onset in late infancy, and reveal a candidate culprit gene. [More]
Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

In a groundbreaking study that offers new hope for women with advanced breast cancer, researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have published final clinical trial results that showed the amount of time patients were on treatment without their cancer worsening (called progression-free survival) was effectively doubled in women with advanced breast cancer who took the experimental drug palbociclib. [More]
Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

NewGen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the publication of preclinical research strongly supporting NT-113, the company's novel irreversible pan-erbB inhibitor (EGFR, HER2 and HER4), as a potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. [More]
Researchers use mathematical models to predict how immune cells respond to disease

Researchers use mathematical models to predict how immune cells respond to disease

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have defined for the first time how the size of the immune response is controlled, using mathematical models to predict how powerfully immune cells respond to infection and disease. [More]
Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]