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Review article provides in depth survey of studies focusing on retinoblastoma protein's role in apoptosis

Review article provides in depth survey of studies focusing on retinoblastoma protein's role in apoptosis

Retinoblastoma protein RB1, which is named after a form of pediatric tumor of the eye, is among the most common genetically regulated cellular proteins to malfunction in human cancer. RB1 was also the first tumor suppressor gene to be identified and its modes of inactivation in retinoblastoma tumors provided the basis for the ground-breaking two-hit hypothesis by the geneticist Alfred G. Knudson in the 70s, according to which cancer is due to the accumulation of multiple 'hits' or mutations in certain genes. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]
Wistar Institute study shows that PI3K inhibitors may make a patient's cancer even worse

Wistar Institute study shows that PI3K inhibitors may make a patient's cancer even worse

The enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) appears to be exploited in almost every type of human cancer, making it the focus of considerable interest as a therapeutic target, with many PI3K-inhibiting drugs currently in various stages of clinical development. However, PI3K inhibitors have only shown modest clinical activity with patients who receive these drugs experiencing very little improvement in survival. [More]
What do cells really look like in 3D?

What do cells really look like in 3D?

Nanolive SA, a start-up company founded in November 2013 at the EPFL Innovation Park in Lausanne, Switzerland, has developed a revolutionary microscope which allows for the very first time the exploration of a living cell in 3D without damaging it. [More]
Discovery sheds light on how the Hippo pathway maintains cellular balance

Discovery sheds light on how the Hippo pathway maintains cellular balance

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a self-regulating loop in the Hippo pathway, a signaling channel garnering increased attention from cancer researchers due to its role in controlling organ size, cell proliferation and cell death. [More]
EPFL scientists show how a major effector protein binds chromatin and regulates gene expression

EPFL scientists show how a major effector protein binds chromatin and regulates gene expression

Inside the cell, DNA is tightly coiled and packed with several proteins into a structure called "chromatin", which allows DNA to fit in the cell while also preventing genes from being expressed at the wrong time. Guided by a chemical "barcode", specialized effector proteins can bind chromatin and either unwind it or compact further to activate or silence genes. [More]
MGH researchers develop new approach to skin rejuvenation

MGH researchers develop new approach to skin rejuvenation

A new approach to skin rejuvenation developed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may be less likely to have unintended side effects such as scarring and altered pigmentation. [More]
Stony Brook University, CadheRx Therapeutics sign licensing agreement for anti-cancer technology

Stony Brook University, CadheRx Therapeutics sign licensing agreement for anti-cancer technology

Stony Brook University has entered into a licensing agreement with a startup company, CadheRx Therapeutics, to develop and market an anti-cancer technology discovered by Sabine Brouxhon, MD, Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. [More]
Researchers identify immune system marker that drives therapy-resistant prostate cancer

Researchers identify immune system marker that drives therapy-resistant prostate cancer

You are a patient who has just been treated for a serious illness but neither you nor your doctor knows how likely it is that you -- in comparison with other patients -- will actually be helped by the treatment. This is often the situation with prostate cancer, one of the deadliest and most highly prevalent cancers. While hormone therapy can help, patient responses vary widely, and it's still unclear why some types of prostate cancer seem to be resistant to the therapy. [More]
Updated SOGC guidelines include FIBRISTAL as only approved medical treatment for uterine fibroids

Updated SOGC guidelines include FIBRISTAL as only approved medical treatment for uterine fibroids

The Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology of Canada has issued updated guidelines for the management of uterine fibroids (uterine leiomyomas), which now include the first and only approved medical treatment for uterine fibroids: FIBRISTAL (ulipristal acetate). [More]
ASCO 2015: Novartis presents data on Zykadia and Tafinlar studies for non-small cell lung cancer

ASCO 2015: Novartis presents data on Zykadia and Tafinlar studies for non-small cell lung cancer

Novartis today announced new data from two Phase II studies of Zykadia (ceritinib), as well as one Phase II study of TafinlarĀ® (dabrafenib) in combination with Mekinist (trametinib) in certain patients with non-small cell lung cancer. [More]
Combination of Mekinist and Tafinlar drugs improves outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma

Combination of Mekinist and Tafinlar drugs improves outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma

Novartis today announced data from the Phase III COMBI-d study showing a significant survival benefit for patients with BRAF V600E/K mutation-positive metastatic melanoma when treated with the combination of Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib) compared to Tafinlar monotherapy alone. [More]
Palbociclib drug shows promise in women with HR+ metastatic breast cancer

Palbociclib drug shows promise in women with HR+ metastatic breast cancer

Despite advances in managing and curing some forms of breast cancer, women whose disease becomes metastatic have fewer effective options. A new phase 3 study in some of the most difficult-to-treat patients, women with endocrine-resistant disease, showed that the newly approved drug, palbociclib, more than doubled the time to cancer recurrence for women with hormone-receptor (HR+) positive metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Researchers suggest new target for treating BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma tumors

Researchers suggest new target for treating BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma tumors

A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, published today in Cell Reports, provides new insight into the molecular changes that lead to resistance to a commonly prescribed group of drugs called BRAF inhibitors. [More]
Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Nanoparticle-based therapy effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma

Researchers have designed a nanoparticle-based therapy that is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. [More]
New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
OSU researchers find promising approach to treating epithelial cancer

OSU researchers find promising approach to treating epithelial cancer

Researchers at Oregon State University are pursuing a new concept in treatment of epithelial cancer, especially head and neck cancer, by using two promising "analogs" of an old compound that was once studied as a potent anti-tumor agent, but long ago abandoned because it was too toxic. [More]
E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

Certain flavorings used in electronic cigarette liquid may alter important cellular functions in lung tissue, according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Researchers identify three genes involved in choroid plexus carcinoma

Researchers identify three genes involved in choroid plexus carcinoma

Researchers have identified three genes that play a pivotal role in the brain tumor choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC), a discovery that lays the groundwork for more effective treatment of this rare, often fatal cancer. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

New study finds link between father's age at birth and child's risk of blood cancer as an adult

A new study links a father's age at birth to the risk that his child will develop blood and immune system cancers as an adult, particularly for only children. The study, which appears in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found no association between having an older mother and these cancers. [More]
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