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Research reveals role of endoglin in shaping blood and cardiac cell fate during early development

Research reveals role of endoglin in shaping blood and cardiac cell fate during early development

New research from the University of Minnesota reveals endoglin as a critical factor in determining the fate of early undifferentiated cells during development. [More]
Sanford wins $11.7 million NIH grant to translate laboratory cancer research into clinical trials

Sanford wins $11.7 million NIH grant to translate laboratory cancer research into clinical trials

The Cancer Biology Research Center at Sanford Research is the recipient of a five-year, nearly $11.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to translate laboratory research into clinical trials for head and neck and pediatric cancers. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Penn researchers help identify unique characteristics of reserve stem cells

Penn researchers help identify unique characteristics of reserve stem cells

Adult stem cells represent a sort of blank clay from which a myriad of different cell and tissue types are molded and as such are of critical importance to health, aging and disease. [More]
New microfluidic device helps extract rare target cells from background cells

New microfluidic device helps extract rare target cells from background cells

A team of researchers from University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, OH have developed a novel microfluidic device, which combines the inertial effect of fluid and microscale vortices generated in microchambers, to achieve simultaneous double sorting of rare target cells and removal of background cells. [More]
Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

A Stanford-led national collaboration to procure and analyze human pancreatic tissue from deceased donors illustrates how the organ's function changes as we age, and could point the way toward new diabetes treatments. [More]
SI-2 molecule can inhibit tumor growth in breast cancer mouse model

SI-2 molecule can inhibit tumor growth in breast cancer mouse model

Cancer cells communicate with their environment through cell molecules that pass on signals to the inside of the cell. The signals help cancer cells multiply and migrate, spreading the disease. [More]
Scientists resolve tumor heterogeneity using innovative DEPArray technology

Scientists resolve tumor heterogeneity using innovative DEPArray technology

Using the innovative DEPArray technology, scientists at Silicon Biosystems, a Bologna (Italy) and San Diego (CA, USA) based biotech company, were able to solve one of the biggest limitation in the study of cancer genetic: tumor samples heterogeneity. [More]
Scalable Protocol to Differentiate Skeletal Muscle Cells from Stem Cells

Scalable Protocol to Differentiate Skeletal Muscle Cells from Stem Cells

AMSBIO announces the availability of the world's first kit to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into functional myotubes. The new kit utilizes a highly efficient media based protocol to produce skeletal muscle cells from stem cells in a simple, scalable manner. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Plasmacytoid dendritic cells may not contribute to late-stage lupus

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells may not contribute to late-stage lupus

For years, biomedical researchers have suspected that a specific set of immune cells are responsible for causing disease in lupus patients, but until now they haven't known for sure one way or the other. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells

Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a method to efficiently turn human stem cells into retinal ganglion cells, the type of nerve cells located within the retina that transmit visual signals from the eye to the brain. Death and dysfunction of these cells cause vision loss in conditions like glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. [More]
LSTM CL3 lab refurbished by Medical Air Technology

LSTM CL3 lab refurbished by Medical Air Technology

Medical Air Technology (MAT) recently completed a project at the prestigious Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), increasing laboratory capacity to accommodate a new machine for counting and profiling cells. Founded in 1898, LSTM is the oldest School in Tropical Medicine in the world, and recognised globally for its groundbreaking research into infectious, debilitating and disabling diseases. [More]
BD Life Sciences completes acquisition of Cellular Research

BD Life Sciences completes acquisition of Cellular Research

BD Life Sciences, a segment of leading global medical technology company BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), today announced it has completed the acquisition of Cellular Research, Inc. [More]
Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

Experimental vaccine candidate can stimulate immune system activity to prevent HIV infection

New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) and The Rockefeller University shows in mice that an experimental vaccine candidate designed at TSRI can stimulate the immune system activity necessary to stop HIV infection. The findings could provide key information for the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. [More]
Scientists one step closer to understanding how brain regulates memory and mood

Scientists one step closer to understanding how brain regulates memory and mood

Scientists are one step closer to understanding how the brain regulates memory and mood, thanks to the discovery of two distinct types of stem cells. [More]
Precision medicine helps improve patient health and reduces risk of side effects, says Penn Medical School dean

Precision medicine helps improve patient health and reduces risk of side effects, says Penn Medical School dean

The rapidly emerging field of precision medicine is a "disruptive innovation" that offers the possibility of remarkably fine-tuned remedies to improve patient health while minimizing the risk of harmful side effects, says J. Larry Jameson, MD, PhD, dean of the Perelman School of Medicine and executive vice president of the University of Pennsylvania for the Health System, in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Ultraspecific and extensively validated monoclonal antibodies now available from AMSBIO

Ultraspecific and extensively validated monoclonal antibodies now available from AMSBIO

AMSBIO has announced the availability of ultraspecific and extensively validated monoclonal antibodies under the UltraMAB™ brand. [More]
Vaccinex completes VX15/2503 Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced, refractory solid tumors

Vaccinex completes VX15/2503 Phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced, refractory solid tumors

Vaccinex, Inc. today announced the successful completion of a multicenter Phase 1, multiple ascending dose clinical trial of VX15/2503 anti-Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) antibody in 42 adult patients with advanced, refractory solid tumors. [More]
New, high-throughput method can sort 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes

New, high-throughput method can sort 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes

University of Hawaii at Manoa College of Engineering mechanical engineer Yi Zuo has developed a new, high-throughput method for sorting cells capable of separating 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes. [More]
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