Cervical Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Cervical Cancer News and Research

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. Also known as the womb, the uterus is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The cervix connects the upper part of the uterus to the vagina (birth canal).

Cervical cancer is highly preventable in most Western countries because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent HPV infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.
Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Traversing the healthcare system can be daunting for almost anyone. Add in the many obstacles that low-income uninsured populations face, and it becomes tremendously more difficult. But a new Northwestern Medicine study shows that guidance from trained navigators can help patients overcome healthcare inequities. [More]
Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Our research into gynaecological oncology focuses around understanding mechanisms of how genes are regulated or how they become dysregulated in a disease; and also the effects that has on the surface of the endometrium and also the function of the ovaries... [More]
NICE publishes Medtech Innovation Briefing on ZedScan

NICE publishes Medtech Innovation Briefing on ZedScan

The NICE MIB has been developed on ZedScan as an adjunct to colposcopy in women with suspected cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia. [More]
New HPV vaccine has potential to prevent 90% of conditions triggered by HPV

New HPV vaccine has potential to prevent 90% of conditions triggered by HPV

A new vaccine against HPV infections has the potential to prevent 90 per cent of all of the conditions triggered by the human papillomavirus. These are the findings of a randomised, controlled, international study involving a new, 9-component vaccine against HPV used on more than 14,000 young women aged between 16 and 26 years. [More]
International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

International phase 2/3 trial shows Gardasil 9 vaccine protects against nine HPV types

Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease. However, most cervical cancers are preventable through immunization against the human papillomavirus (HPV). A pivotal international phase 2/3 clinical trial involving Moffitt Cancer Center faculty demonstrated that vaccination with Gardasil 9 protects against nine HPV types, seven of which cause most cases of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease. [More]
New nine-valent HPV vaccine has potential to dramatically reduce cervical cancer rates

New nine-valent HPV vaccine has potential to dramatically reduce cervical cancer rates

A multinational study on a diverse group of women shows that a new nine-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents infections and disease associated with the vaccine types, according to a paper published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

In an effort to stop tuberculosis (TB) from becoming progressively less treatable worldwide, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College more than $6.2 million in first-year funding to support a research collaboration among six institutions in close alliance with voluntary pharmaceutical partners. [More]
NanoGap sensor helps detect bladder and kidney cancer at an early stage

NanoGap sensor helps detect bladder and kidney cancer at an early stage

A new mobile device that allows bladder and kidney cancer to be detected at an early stage. This is being worked on by Wilfred van der Wiel, professor of nanoelectronics at the University of Twente MESA+ research institute. Thanks to this method, it is possible to read from DNA cells whether their carrier has bladder or kidney cancer. [More]
Cervarix effective against other common cancer-causing HPVs

Cervarix effective against other common cancer-causing HPVs

According to a multinational clinical trial involving nearly 20,000 young women, the human papilloma virus vaccine, Cervarix, not only has the potential to prevent cervical cancer, but was effective against other common cancer-causing human papillomaviruses, aside from just the two HPV types, 16 and 18, which are responsible for about 70 percent of all cases. [More]
Groundbreaking research aims to provide more effective treatment for women with cervical cancer

Groundbreaking research aims to provide more effective treatment for women with cervical cancer

UNIVERSITY of Huddersfield researcher Dr Tsitsi Chituku is taking part in a project that seeks to learn more about the genetic factors that make some women more susceptible to cervical cancer. It was a recent visit to Africa, to carry out a health screening project involving hundreds of women, which helped to shape the emphasis of her research. [More]
Nine in 10 people are positive about cancer screening yet screening uptake is lower

Nine in 10 people are positive about cancer screening yet screening uptake is lower

Nine in 10 people think that cancer screening is 'almost always a good idea' despite the fact that screening uptake is lower, a Cancer Research UK study* in the British Journal of Cancer shows. [More]
Cervical treatment procedures do not affect fertility, shows study

Cervical treatment procedures do not affect fertility, shows study

Common surgical procedures used to diagnose and treat precancerous cervical lesions do not decrease women's chances of becoming pregnant, according to a study that followed nearly 100,000 women for up to 12 years. [More]
HPV vaccine does not increase rates of STIs in adolescent females

HPV vaccine does not increase rates of STIs in adolescent females

Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, partly because of concerns about how it will affect adolescent sexual activity. [More]
Investigators develop microbiome map of New York City subway system

Investigators develop microbiome map of New York City subway system

The microbes that call the New York City subway system home are mostly harmless, but include samples of disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to drugs -- and even DNA fragments associated with anthrax and Bubonic plague -- according to a citywide microbiome map published today by Weill Cornell Medical College investigators. [More]
International community funding can significantly reduce cancer deaths in LMICs by 2030

International community funding can significantly reduce cancer deaths in LMICs by 2030

Increased annual international community funding of US$18 billion globally could save three million lives per year by 2030 and many more in succeeding decades, [More]
UTMB study reveals that only about half of teenage girls get HPV vaccine at the recommended age

UTMB study reveals that only about half of teenage girls get HPV vaccine at the recommended age

It's a virus that is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer but a new study by University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers indicates that only about half of the girls receive the vaccine at the recommended age to best protect themselves. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Two medical organizations recommend use of HPV test for cervical cancer screening

Two medical organizations recommend use of HPV test for cervical cancer screening

Two leading medical organizations say that using a Human papillomavirus (HPV) test alone for cervical cancer screening is an effective alternative to the current recommendation for screening with either cytology (the Pap test) alone or co-testing with cytology and HPV testing. [More]
New guidance recommends use of primary HPV test for cervical cancer screening

New guidance recommends use of primary HPV test for cervical cancer screening

About 80 million U.S. women ages 25 to 65 should be screened periodically by their health care providers for cervical cancer. At present, the standard way to do that is a Pap smear alone, or co-testing using both a Pap smear and a human papillomavirus (HPV) test. [More]
Sirnaomics submits STP705 IND Application to CFDA for skin scar treatment

Sirnaomics submits STP705 IND Application to CFDA for skin scar treatment

Sirnaomics, Inc. and its affiliate Suzhou Sirnaomics Pharmaceutics, Co. Ltd., together with its partner Guangzhou Xiangxue Pharmaceutical, Co. Ltd., (SZSE: 300147), have formally submitted an Investigational New Drug (IND) Application to the China Food and Drug Administration for STP705, an anti-fibrosis RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic for prevention and treatment of human skin hypertrophic scars. [More]