Cervical Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Cervical Cancer News and Research

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. Also known as the womb, the uterus is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The cervix connects the upper part of the uterus to the vagina (birth canal).

Cervical cancer is highly preventable in most Western countries because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent HPV infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.
Study: Immunization program in UK has reduced HPV infections in young women

Study: Immunization program in UK has reduced HPV infections in young women

Each year around 2,000-2,500 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer in England, the most common cancer in women under 35. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) types 16 and 18 is responsible for around 70-80% of cervical cancers. [More]
Treating advanced cervical cancer: an interview with Dr. Krishnansu Tewari

Treating advanced cervical cancer: an interview with Dr. Krishnansu Tewari

Cervical cancer affects approximately 500,000 women every year globally of which 250,000 die annually, making it the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related death in women. [More]
Two doses of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix non-inferior to three-doses

Two doses of HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix non-inferior to three-doses

A recent study in the journal Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, showed that two doses of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline) are non-inferior to three-doses in the current schedule. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals receives three industry awards at World Vaccine Congress

Inovio Pharmaceuticals receives three industry awards at World Vaccine Congress

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that it was recognized with three industry awards at the World Vaccine Congress, which is being held this week in Washington, D.C. The Vaccine Industry Excellence (ViE) Awards recognize outstanding vaccine advancements and achievements of therapeutic and preventive vaccine developers across the global industry as judged by a panel of global biotech industry stakeholders. [More]
Research report on China's bevacizumab market

Research report on China's bevacizumab market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Investigation Report on China Bevacizumab Market, 2009-2018" report to their offering. [More]
XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists from Weill Cornell Medical College and Houston Methodist have found that a gene previously unassociated with breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the growth and progression of the triple negative form of the disease, a particularly deadly strain that often has few treatment options. Their research, published in this week's Nature, suggests that targeting the gene may be a new approach to treating the disease. [More]
Japanese mushroom extract active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) may have role in prevention HPV-related cancers

Japanese mushroom extract active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) may have role in prevention HPV-related cancers

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Real-time cervical cancer diagnostics: an interview with Sameer Kothari, Chief Executive of Zilico

Real-time cervical cancer diagnostics: an interview with Sameer Kothari, Chief Executive of Zilico

Cervical cancer diagnosis is a two-step process. In developed countries, women are invited for a smear test which mainly uses LBC (liquid-based cytology), where a sample of cells are taken from the cervix and sent to a cytopathology lab for analysis. [More]
Uptake for HPV jab below 80% required to make significant impact on cervical cancer

Uptake for HPV jab below 80% required to make significant impact on cervical cancer

Young women who are most at risk of developing cervical cancer are the least likely to be offered the protective HPV jab and to complete the full course when they are, reveals research published online in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections. [More]
Researchers develop therapy to attack cervical cancer tumors

Researchers develop therapy to attack cervical cancer tumors

One of the most promising technologies for the treatment of various cancers is nanotechnology, creating drugs that directly attack the cancer cells without damaging other tissues' development. [More]

Erlotinib has promising potential to improve treatment for cervical cancer

A new clinical study has found that erlotinib, a targeted antitumor agent, has promising potential to improve treatment for cervical cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the results indicate that larger trials are warranted to determine whether the drug should become part of standard therapy for women with the disease. [More]

HPV vaccine offers protection against cervical abnormalities in young women

The HPV vaccine offers significant protection against cervical abnormalities in young women, suggests a paper published on bmj.com today. [More]
Women need to participate in regular screenings to reduce cancer risk, improve survival

Women need to participate in regular screenings to reduce cancer risk, improve survival

Cancer Council says an improvement in the uptake of breast and cervical screening is crucial, following the release of new figures by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare yesterday. [More]
Survival rates for bladder cancer in UK are falling, confirms new study

Survival rates for bladder cancer in UK are falling, confirms new study

Of the top 10 cancers in the UK, bladder cancer is only one where survival rates have been shown to be getting worse. New figures published this month in the Journal of Clinical Urology confirm in a study of cases of bladder cancer in England over a 19 year period (from 1990 until 2009) that survival rates here in the UK are falling and are worse than in than in other European countries with similar incidence rates. [More]

Researchers create new probe that freezes cells to "see" at greater detail without damaging

It's an odd twist. For scientists to determine if a cell is functioning properly, they must destroy it. This is what happens in X-ray fluorescence microscopy when biological specimens are exposed to ionizing radiation, which provides images with a level of detail that conventional microscopes just can't match. [More]
QIAGEN launches careHPV Test in India for prevention of cervical cancer among women

QIAGEN launches careHPV Test in India for prevention of cervical cancer among women

QIAGEN N.V. today announced the commercial launch in India of its careHPVā„¢ Test, the only molecular diagnostic for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) designed to screen women in settings with limited healthcare infrastructure, such as areas lacking electricity, water or laboratories. [More]

Physician performs research on cervical cancer

Research on cervical cancer performed by a physician at the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Avastin can prolong the lives of women with advanced cervical cancer

New data showing cancer treatment Avastin (bevacizumab) can extend the lives of women with advanced cervical cancer compared to chemotherapy alone has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Improving access to pediatric check-ups may increase parent's awareness about HPV vaccines

Improving access to pediatric check-ups may increase parental awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, a new nationwide study reveals. [More]
New approach for delivering vaccines and for stimulating body's immune system to attack tumors

New approach for delivering vaccines and for stimulating body's immune system to attack tumors

Many vaccines, including those for influenza, polio, and measles, consist of a killed or disabled version of a virus. However, for certain diseases, this type of vaccine is ineffective, or just too risky. [More]