Cervical Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Cervical Cancer News and Research

Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. Also known as the womb, the uterus is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The cervix connects the upper part of the uterus to the vagina (birth canal).

Cervical cancer is highly preventable in most Western countries because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent HPV infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.
Study shows trophon EPR effective in inactivating high-risk, cancer-causing HPV

Study shows trophon EPR effective in inactivating high-risk, cancer-causing HPV

A new study presented at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has demonstrated that the trophon EPR is the only high level disinfection system proven to kill natural, infectious, high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) under normal use conditions. [More]
Study shows trophon EPR effective in inactivating high-risk, cancer-causing HPV

Study shows trophon EPR effective in inactivating high-risk, cancer-causing HPV

A new study presented at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has demonstrated that the trophon EPR is the only high level disinfection system proven to kill natural, infectious, high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) under normal use conditions. [More]
Uninsured, low-income women in non-expansion states less likely to receive breast, cervical cancer screenings

Uninsured, low-income women in non-expansion states less likely to receive breast, cervical cancer screenings

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers recently conducted a study that found low-income and uninsured women in states that are not expanding their Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid coverage are less likely to receive breast and cervical cancer screenings compared to states that are implementing expansions. [More]

Study: Failure to extend ACA Medicaid coverage widens cancer screening disparities for low-income women

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers recently conducted a study that found low-income and uninsured women in states that are not expanding their Affordable Care Act Medicaid coverage are less likely to receive breast and cervical cancer screenings compared to states that are implementing expansions. [More]
New study finds that electronic reminders help raise HPV vaccination rates

New study finds that electronic reminders help raise HPV vaccination rates

A new study finds that a simple reminder via electronic health record systems may go a long way in encouraging patients to get the HPV vaccine that protects against cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine has the lowest completion rates of any other vaccine. [More]
Scientists identify key factors in parents' decision-making about HPV vaccination of daughters

Scientists identify key factors in parents' decision-making about HPV vaccination of daughters

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases, with more than 70% of sexually active people getting the virus at least once in their lifetimes. Persistent infection with some HPV strains can lead to cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women, as well as to head-and-neck and other types of cancer and anogenital warts in both men and women. [More]
Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many adults in the U.S. are not getting the recommended screening tests for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers, according to data published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. For 2013, screening for these types of cancers either fell behind previous rates or showed no improvement. [More]
Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have shown for the first time that a gene previously implicated in blood vessel formation during embryonic development and tumor growth also induces immune suppression during tumor development. [More]
First new treatment authorised in a decade for advanced cervical cancer patients in the UK

First new treatment authorised in a decade for advanced cervical cancer patients in the UK

The European Commission has licensed Avastin in combination with standard chemotherapy for the treatment of women with advanced cervical cancer. Until now, the treatment has been available ahead of licence to eligible patients in England via individual requests to the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF). [More]
Medical University of Vienna study supports use of ANGLE's Parsortix system for ovarian cancer study

Medical University of Vienna study supports use of ANGLE's Parsortix system for ovarian cancer study

ANGLE plc, the specialist medtech company, is delighted to announce that the Medical University of Vienna, one of its key opinion leaders, has published highly encouraging results in support of the use of ANGLE's Parsortix system in the detection of ovarian cancer. [More]
Global changes in cancer cells' epigenome may determine disease progression

Global changes in cancer cells' epigenome may determine disease progression

Genomic studies have illuminated the ways in which malfunctioning genes can drive cancer growth while stunting the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and other treatments. But new findings from Weill Cornell Medical College investigators indicate that these genes are only partly to blame for why treatment that was at one point effective ultimately fails for about 40 percent of patients diagnosed with the most common form of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. [More]
Vaccinating adolescent boys against HPV could prevent oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer

Vaccinating adolescent boys against HPV could prevent oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer

A new study indicates that vaccinating 12-year-old boys against the humanpapilloma virus (HPV) may be a cost-effective strategy for preventing oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer, a cancer that starts at the back of the throat and mouth, and involves the tonsils and base of the tongue. [More]
UQDI reveals that Anisina drug can kill melanoma cells

UQDI reveals that Anisina drug can kill melanoma cells

US-Australian drug discovery company, Novogen, today announced that studies conducted at The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute revealed that experimental drug, Anisina, killed melanoma cells irrespective of their mutational status. [More]
Harry Folk speaks about successful throat cancer treatment received at St. Luke’s Cancer Center

Harry Folk speaks about successful throat cancer treatment received at St. Luke’s Cancer Center

It’s been nine years since Harry Folk of Palmer Township had a scare with throat cancer. He is able to talk about his journey, literally, thanks to the treatment he received at St. Luke’s. The treatment plan recommended by his cancer team not only removed his cancer, but preserved his voice and ability to swallow without difficulty. [More]
CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

The CVS Health Foundation, a private foundation created by CVS Health Corporation (NYSE: CVS), today announced 55 new grant recipients as part of its multi-year, $5 million commitment to increase access to health care in communities nationwide. [More]
Pyrexar Medical procures hyperthermia assets of BSD Medical, begins operations

Pyrexar Medical procures hyperthermia assets of BSD Medical, begins operations

Pyrexar Medical begins operations today after completing the acquisition of hyperthermia assets held by Perseon, formerly BSD Medical. This acquisition includes substantially all hyperthermia assets, products, services and related intellectual property. [More]
Merck announces availability of GARDASIL 9 HPV vaccine in Canada

Merck announces availability of GARDASIL 9 HPV vaccine in Canada

Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, announced today that GARDASIL 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant), Merck's 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, is now available in Canada. [More]
Detecting bladder cancer from urine: an interview with Suzana Nahum-Zilberberg, CEO, BioLight

Detecting bladder cancer from urine: an interview with Suzana Nahum-Zilberberg, CEO, BioLight

Bladder cancer is the seventh leading cancer affecting men worldwide and in the United States, it is the fourth leading cancer. Each year, about 350,000 cases are being detected worldwide, and the disease claims 165,000 lives every year. [More]
Women with IBD may be at increased risk for developing cervical cancer

Women with IBD may be at increased risk for developing cervical cancer

Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of cervical dysplasia and cancer, according to a new study1 published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Duke researchers develop new model to study why some HPV infections go away and others progress

Duke researchers develop new model to study why some HPV infections go away and others progress

For people infected with the human papilloma virus (HPV), the likelihood of clearing the infection and avoiding HPV-related cancer may depend less on the body's disease-fighting arsenal than has been generally assumed. [More]
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