Cesarean Section News and Research RSS Feed - Cesarean Section News and Research

Cesarean Section is a procedure where the baby is delivered through an abdominal incision. Also called cesarean delivery or cesarean birth.
Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

As a group, jail-involved individuals, which we define here as people with a history of arrest and jail admission in the recent past, carry a heavy illness burden, with high rates of infectious and chronic disease as well as mental illness and substance use. [More]
Doula's support increases satisfaction during labor and delivery

Doula's support increases satisfaction during labor and delivery

Fewer medical interventions, fewer hours in labor and increased satisfaction with the birthing experience—that's what national statistics say a doula's support during labor and delivery means to women and their partners. A doula is a trained woman who provides nonmedical support during labor and delivery. [More]

Report highlights recommendations to advance safety of childbirth in Indonesia

Indonesia is a fast-rising economic power that has made significant progress toward key development goals including reducing child mortality. But for reasons outlined in a National Academy of Sciences report by U.S. and Indonesian experts, the nation's estimated rates of maternal and neonatal mortality remain tragically high. [More]

State highlights: Battle over jail medical care in Texas jails; Medicaid coverage for inmates; N.C. docs sue over Medicaid billing system

In November, David Conis Jr. sat in a Henderson County courtroom, vomiting repeatedly because of his vacillating blood-sugar levels, terrified that he was facing a diabetic coma. ... Henderson County state district Judge Carter Tarrance, concerned that the county jail was not providing adequate care, sent Conis to a local clinic and ordered the jail to follow the doctor's instructions (Grissom, 1/17). [More]
First Edition: January 17, 2014

First Edition: January 17, 2014

Today's headlines include reports from Capitol Hill about passage of a $1.1 billion spending bill as well as testimony by an Obama administration official about healthcare.gov [More]
Viewpoints: 'Celebrating' enrollment numbers; Maryland's website 'debacle;' abortion battle moves again to high court

Viewpoints: 'Celebrating' enrollment numbers; Maryland's website 'debacle;' abortion battle moves again to high court

Today the federal government released the most comprehensive data yet about who signed up for Obamacare through Dec. 28. There's reason to cheer for both the law's supporters and its detractors. ... Today's numbers don't settle the question of whether the administration will hit its goals for enrollment in the exchanges, measured either in raw numbers or demographic breakdown. But they show that those goals are within reach (Christopher Flavelle, 1/13). [More]

Unnecessary cesarean section rates rising at both rural and urban hospitals

Rates of unnecessary cesarean section and other potentially risky obstetric procedures show some significant differences between rural and urban hospitals in the United States, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. [More]
Two intrauterine contraceptive systems safe and effective in preventing pregnancies

Two intrauterine contraceptive systems safe and effective in preventing pregnancies

In a finding that could expand the use of one of the most effective forms of birth control, two intrauterine contraceptive systems that had lower doses of the contraceptive hormone, levonorgestrel, were found to be safe and effective in preventing pregnancies, according to an international study that included researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). [More]

Multiple pregnancies: A major public health concern worldwide

Multiple pregnancies are a major public health concern in the United States and the rest of the world due to the significantly higher health risks for both mothers and infants, as well as the impact on healthcare costs. [More]
'Early-term' babies more likely to experience higher risk for adverse health outcomes

'Early-term' babies more likely to experience higher risk for adverse health outcomes

Babies considered "early-term," born at 37 or 38 weeks after a mother's last menstrual period, may look as healthy as full-term babies born at 39-41 weeks, but a new study published by University at Buffalo physicians in JAMA Pediatrics has found that many of them are not. [More]

Early-term births associated with higher neonatal morbidity, shows study

Early-term births (37 to 38 weeks gestation) are associated with higher neonatal morbidity (illness) and with more neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or neonatology service admissions than term births (39 to 41 weeks gestation), according to a study by Shaon Sengupta, M.D., M.P.H., now of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and formerly of the University at Buffalo, N.Y., and colleagues. [More]

BD, WHO commit to develop and launch Odon Device for assisted delivery of newborns

BD, a leading global medical technology company, and the World Health Organization, together with Saving Lives at Birth: A Grand Challenge for Development partners, today announced a commitment to develop and launch the Odon Device, an innovative new obstetrical instrument for assisting the delivery of newborns during circumstances of troublesome labor. [More]

Experts to gather in Uganda to recognize advancements made in prevention, treatment of fistula

Government officials, representatives of nongovernmental organizations, doctors, and health care providers from around the world will gather in Uganda this week to recognize the advancements made in the prevention and treatment of fistula, a devastating childbirth injury. [More]

IVF, cesarean section asthma link strengthened

Researchers from Greece have shown that pediatric asthma is associated with both conception by in vitro fertilization and birth by cesarean section. [More]

Drug oxytocin may contribute to postpartum bleeding, researchers find

With the number of maternal deaths on the rise in the United States, researchers found that a drug frequently used to augment or induce labor may contribute to postpartum bleeding, a study in the September issue of Anesthesiology notes. [More]

Assumption that uterine blood redistributed into maternal circulation after delivery challenged

In an examination comparing the effects of two drugs on blood pressure, pulse, heart rate and cardiac output in women having elective delivery by cesarean section, an old assumption that uterine blood is redistributed into the maternal circulation after delivery was challenged, according to a study in the September issue of Anesthesiology. [More]

Vaginal birth increases risk of pelvic organ prolapse within year after delivery

Women who give birth vaginally are at increased risk of developing pelvic organ prolapse during the year after delivery, according to a study of Chinese women by researchers at Yale School of Medicine and Wenzhou Third People's Hospital. [More]

Delivery services at birth center safe for low-income women and their infants

Low-income women who chose to deliver their baby at a birthing center under the care of a certified nurse-midwife had the same or better birthing experience as women under traditional care with a hospital-based obstetrician, according to a new study in Health Services Research. [More]

Study: Anesthesia increases success rates of version procedures, decreases cost of delivery

When a baby is in the breech position at the end of pregnancy, obstetricians can sometimes turn the baby head-down to enable a safer vaginal birth. [More]
Women with pre-pregnancy BMI of 40 have increased risk of C-section

Women with pre-pregnancy BMI of 40 have increased risk of C-section

Researchers from Norway found that women with a pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) of 40 had an increased risk of vacuum extraction delivery or Cesarean section (C-section). [More]