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Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Study evaluates influence of midwife-led antenatal care on VBAC rates

Study evaluates influence of midwife-led antenatal care on VBAC rates

Women who had a caesarean section in a previous pregnancy are much more likely to have a safer vaginal birth if their antenatal care is led by a midwife, according to a new study from The University of Manchester. [More]
Antibodies given within one day of SHIV exposure can clear the virus

Antibodies given within one day of SHIV exposure can clear the virus

Scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center today revealed that infant rhesus macaques treated with antibodies within 24 hours of being exposed to SHIV, a chimeric simian virus that bears the HIV envelope protein, were completely cleared of the virus. [More]
Zika virus can cause a range of abnormalities in pregnant women, study finds

Zika virus can cause a range of abnormalities in pregnant women, study finds

New research presents strong evidence that the Zika virus can indeed cause a range of abnormalities in pregnant women infected with the virus -- with the effects manifesting any time during pregnancy. Some of the abnormalities noted have not been reported in connection with the virus. [More]
Small, tablet-sized ultrasound devices may help midwives figure out C-section candidates

Small, tablet-sized ultrasound devices may help midwives figure out C-section candidates

Midwives need more than fingers to figure out who the C-section candidates are. Small, tablet-sized ultrasound devices may be the key. [More]
CHLA cardiologists perform rare fetal cardiac intervention procedure

CHLA cardiologists perform rare fetal cardiac intervention procedure

Last August, when Children's Hospital Los Angeles cardiologists confirmed that the heart of a 27-week-old fetus suffered from a critical cardiac condition that prevented blood returning from the fetus's lungs from circulating back into the body, they told the parents that their child faced certain open-heart surgery after birth. Even worse, babies born with this very rare condition—hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) with restrictive atrial septum—have a 50 percent neonatal mortality rate. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Scientists from the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, collaborating with NYU Langone Medical Center and a multi-center team of researchers, demonstrated for the first time that the microbiome of newborn babies delivered via cesarean section (C-section) can be partially restored to resemble that of vaginally delivered infants. [More]
Virtual and augmented reality in surgical training: an interview with Dr Shafi Ahmed

Virtual and augmented reality in surgical training: an interview with Dr Shafi Ahmed

Virtual reality and augmented reality use similar technologies but offer slightly different experiences and usage scenarios.

We’ve developed a VR training tool that enables trainee surgeons to become immersed in another surgeon’s reality and gain their perspective of a recorded operation. [More]
New study outlines risk for in-hospital and out-of-hospital births in Oregon

New study outlines risk for in-hospital and out-of-hospital births in Oregon

The out-of-hospital birth setting in Oregon was associated with a higher risk of perinatal death, while the in-hospital birth setting was associated with a higher risk for cesarean delivery and other obstetric interventions (e.g., induction or augmentation of labor), according a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University. [More]
Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Premature triplets released from Loyola University Medical Center in time for first Christmas

Triplets Finn, Kyle and Ava Santiago, who were born six weeks premature and underweight, went home from Loyola University Medical Center Dec. 24, just in time to celebrate their first Christmas. [More]
Surgical startup seeks funding to build virtual reality training library

Surgical startup seeks funding to build virtual reality training library

Medical Realities, a pioneering medical training startup, today announced that it is raising £400,000 in new investment to improve surgical education by creating a series of virtual and augmented reality training tutorials. [More]
Obese women who lose weight during pregnancy have healthier babies, save health care costs

Obese women who lose weight during pregnancy have healthier babies, save health care costs

A recent study conducted by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston shows that severely obese women who maintained or lost weight during pregnancy had healthier babies and lower health care costs. [More]
Cesarean delivery does not reduce fracture risk in newborns with rare bone disorder

Cesarean delivery does not reduce fracture risk in newborns with rare bone disorder

Cesarean delivery was not associated with decrease in the at-birth fracture rates in infants with osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare bone disorder, said a consortium of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine. [More]
New research examines complications related to labor anesthesia in women with thrombocytopenia

New research examines complications related to labor anesthesia in women with thrombocytopenia

Can women with low platelet counts safely undergo epidural/spinal anesthesia during labor? Available evidence suggests a low rate of complications related to abnormal blood clotting for this large group of patients, reports a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
New article highlights benefits and risks of cesarean delivery on maternal request

New article highlights benefits and risks of cesarean delivery on maternal request

More and more mothers facing childbirth are asking for a cesarean. There are many reasons for this, ranging from the social and cultural to the personal, such as fear about the birth. A review article in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztbl 112: 489-95) by two Munich gynecologists, Ioannis Mylonas and Klaus Friese, considers the risks and benefits of cesarean delivery on maternal request. [More]
New five point model of midwifery care results in safer birth outcomes, lower Cesarean Section rates

New five point model of midwifery care results in safer birth outcomes, lower Cesarean Section rates

Donna Tabas, CNM, M.S., has developed a new five point model of midwifery care for low risk women that results in faster, safe, natural and empowering labor and birthing outcomes in both first time and repeat birthing mothers and extremely low Cesarean Section rates. [More]
Cost of childbirths can vary depending on the type of hospital, shows study

Cost of childbirths can vary depending on the type of hospital, shows study

The cost of having a baby can vary by almost $10,000 depending on which hospital is chosen, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found in a study published in the July issue of the journal Health Affairs. [More]
Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by Cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study examines whether children born by C-section face risk of chronic diseases later in life

Study examines whether children born by C-section face risk of chronic diseases later in life

A new paper in the British Medical Journal by Jan Blustein, M.D., Ph.D., of New York University's Wagner School and a professor of Medicine and Population Health at NYU School of Medicine and Jianmeng Liu, M.D., Ph.D., of Peking University examines the evidence as to whether newborns delivered by Cesarean section are more likely to develop chronic diseases later in life. [More]

New $2.6 million grant targets expectant mothers requiring cesarean section in Kenya

In an especially underserved region of western Kenya, expectant mothers requiring cesarean section are the focus of a new $2.6 million grant to Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), Kenya's AIC Kijabe Hospital and the Kenya-based Center for Public Health and Development. [More]
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