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'Green' fragranced products may also emit carcinogenic hazardous air pollutants

'Green' fragranced products may also emit carcinogenic hazardous air pollutants

Dr. Anne Steinemann, Professor of Civil Engineering, and the Chair of Sustainable Cities, from the Department of Infrastructure Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, is a world expert on environmental pollutants, air quality, and health effects. [More]
Trust for America's Health supports President's proposal to end sequestration

Trust for America's Health supports President's proposal to end sequestration

The following is a statement from Jeffrey Levi, PhD, executive director of the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and chair of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. [More]
OCC partners commend EU decision that supports disability protections for obesity

OCC partners commend EU decision that supports disability protections for obesity

In a joint position statement, Obesity Care Continuum (OCC) partners agree with the premise behind a recent European Court of Justice ruling supporting disability protections for obesity under certain circumstances and call for these protections to be enacted in the United States. [More]

New online training module launched for early child care professionals

The Penn State Hershey Center for the Protection of Children has created an online training module - iLook Out for Child Abuse - to help early child care professionals meet new state laws regarding training and reporting of suspected child abuse. The regulations under Act 31 of 2014 take effect on December 31. [More]
New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

New report finds that American children are generally safer, better-educated

American children are generally safer and better-educated than they have been in 20 years, a new report from Duke University finds. [More]
WHO reviews health services in Ebola-affected countries

WHO reviews health services in Ebola-affected countries

On 10-11 December 2014, Ministers of Health and Finance of Ebola-affected countries, international organizations and development partners assembled for a high-level meeting on how to strengthen systems of health in Ebola-affected countries and agreed on what needs to be done to rebuild and strengthen essential health services in these countries. [More]

Study: Disruptions in child care can affect children's social development as early as age 4

A new study from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute reveals that disruptions in child care negatively affect children's social development as early as age 4. However, the study also shows that the effects of child care instability are not unduly large--and some types of instability appear to have no negative impact on children. [More]

Cookie Monster video helps preschoolers develop skills critical to school readiness

Who would have thought a Sesame Street video starring the Cookie Monster, of all characters, could teach preschoolers self-control? [More]
Efforts to roll back school nutritional standards could jeopardize gains made against childhood obesity

Efforts to roll back school nutritional standards could jeopardize gains made against childhood obesity

Efforts to roll back current nutritional standards for the National School Lunch Program could jeopardize gains made in the fight against childhood obesity, write the authors of an article that will appear in the November 13 New England Journal of Medicine and has been released online. [More]
Viewpoints: Health law undercuts labor markets; the surprising foes on Calif. Prop 45

Viewpoints: Health law undercuts labor markets; the surprising foes on Calif. Prop 45

A report out today from the Republican staff of the Senate Budget Committee highlights a critical point about Obamacare: The law's negative effect on labor markets helps explain why it will increase deficits by $131 billion over the next 10 years. This finding stands in stark contrast to Democrats' repeated assertions that the law will reduce the deficit. The public dialogue on Obamacare has thus far largely focused on how the law affects premiums and limits access to certain health insurance plans or doctors. [More]
Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

A web-based system that allows preschools and child care centers to report illnesses to local public health departments could improve the detection of disease outbreaks and allow resources to be mobilized more quickly, according to University of Michigan research to be presented Saturday, Oct. 11 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego. [More]
New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today welcomed three new partners to the Saving Brains Grand Challenge: Aga Khan Foundation Canada, Norlien Foundation and World Vision Canada. These organizations strengthen the existing partnership with the Bernard van Leer Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation. [More]
State highlights: Infant mortality rises in D.C.; Medicaid managed care rates

State highlights: Infant mortality rises in D.C.; Medicaid managed care rates

The District's infant mortality rate ticked up in 2012, city officials announced Wednesday -- an unwelcome development that comes amid the loss of a key federal grant and the launch of a new effort to reduce infant deaths (DeBonis, 10/1). [More]

Majority of Americans find the health law hard to understand, poll finds

An Associated Press-GfK poll finds that nearly 75 percent of Americans find the overhaul "difficult" and nearly half say it is "very hard" to understand. However, health care remains a key issue. In California, there's an effort, for instance, to target messages that include access to health care in outreach to the much-sought-after female voters. Meanwhile, efforts to undo the health law will remain high on the GOP to-do list if Republcans gain control of the Senate. [More]
Some small businesses help workers buy individual coverage

Some small businesses help workers buy individual coverage

The Associated Press examines health insurance costs from different perspectives -- that of a small businessman who provides workers with additional compensation to purchase their own coverage, rather than offering a company health plan, and that of a middle-class family facing mounting financial pressure which includes health premiums. [More]
Viewpoints: Surgery surprise: Out-of-network doctors' bills; consequences of making Medicaid enrollees pay premiums

Viewpoints: Surgery surprise: Out-of-network doctors' bills; consequences of making Medicaid enrollees pay premiums

The New York Times' Elisabeth Rosenthal offered an important lesson in healthcare economics over the weekend that's a must-read for anyone about to undergo a major medical procedure. [More]
State policies fail to provide sufficient two-generation supports to families with young children

State policies fail to provide sufficient two-generation supports to families with young children

Recent two-generation approaches to reducing poverty that help children and their parents are receiving increasing attention from researchers, advocates, and foundations. [More]
Social integration, strong family ties can help those who struggle with substance abuse

Social integration, strong family ties can help those who struggle with substance abuse

Social integration, including strong family ties, can protect one's well-being and even reduce the impact high-risk genes have on health. [More]
Teachers help kids to reduce childhood obesity

Teachers help kids to reduce childhood obesity

An innovative physical activities guide developed at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) is helping North Carolina fight childhood obesity. [More]
Study: Younger, older people likelier to visit ER repeatedly with gallstone pain before surgery

Study: Younger, older people likelier to visit ER repeatedly with gallstone pain before surgery

Gallstone pain is one of the most common reasons patients visit emergency rooms. Figuring out who needs emergency gallbladder removal and who can go home and schedule surgery at their convenience is sometimes a tricky question, and it isn't always answered correctly. [More]
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