Child Care News and Research RSS Feed - Child Care News and Research

Working full time not enough to make ends meet in Florida families

Working full time not enough to make ends meet in Florida families

Even after working 40 or more hours a week, thousands of Florida parents would need to earn nearly double the state's current hourly minimum wage in order to break even, according to policy analyses conducted by researchers at the National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Preschoolers with early bedtime routines less likely to become obese teenagers

Preschoolers with early bedtime routines less likely to become obese teenagers

Preschoolers who are regularly tucked into bed by 8 p.m. are far less likely to become obese teenagers than young children who go to sleep later in the evening, new research has found. [More]
Study shows workplace conditions may contribute to gender-based job stress

Study shows workplace conditions may contribute to gender-based job stress

Social scientists have long known that women working in numerically male-dominated occupations like physics and firefighting report experiencing workplace stress, but men who work in numerically female-dominated occupations like nursing and child care do not. [More]
Non-drug solutions for postpartum depression: an interview with Dr David Brock & Christopher Thatcher

Non-drug solutions for postpartum depression: an interview with Dr David Brock & Christopher Thatcher

Postpartum depression (PPD) is reported to occur in 10-15% of delivering women with an estimated 400,000 women affected annually in the US. It is the most common complication of childbirth and is a significant public health concern. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children

NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children

NPS MedicineWise has written to child care centres across Australia to enlist their support in responding to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Child care staff are well placed to help with education and increase awareness around the misuse of antibiotics in young children. [More]
Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs

Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center found that targeted intervention helps improve follow-up rates by more than 70 percent for newborns who fail initial hearing screenings at birth hospitals. [More]
Formal mental health therapies offer little relief from postpartum depression for low-income mothers of color

Formal mental health therapies offer little relief from postpartum depression for low-income mothers of color

Health care providers and human service agencies often manage postpartum depression with formal mental health treatments and antidepressant therapies, but for new, low-income mothers of color these interventions often provide little relief from the mood disorder that sometimes follows childbirth, according to a new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher. [More]
Novel strategy for obesity prevention in young children

Novel strategy for obesity prevention in young children

A novel approach to preventing overweight/obesity in young children by replacing traditional, individual well-child care with a series of group visits that emphasize nutrition-focused interventions during the first 18 months of life was associated with a significantly reduced obesity rate at 2 years of age. [More]
Parent, provider partnership benefits child's development during transition from home to non-parental care

Parent, provider partnership benefits child's development during transition from home to non-parental care

A new University of Illinois study reveals that the transition from home to child care is an important time for creating a partnership between parent and provider that benefits the child's development. [More]
Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in U.S. unchanged, finds new CDC report

Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in U.S. unchanged, finds new CDC report

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) largely unchanged from two years ago, at one in 68 children (or 1.46 percent). [More]
Breastfeeding essential for first six months of newborns' life

Breastfeeding essential for first six months of newborns' life

Newborns should be breastfed exclusively for the first six months of life with continued breastfeeding until at least 12 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. This can be hard when new breastfeeding families have to rely on child care facilities because of a need to return to work in a specified time. What kind of breastfeeding support, if any, can they rely on from the child care facility? This question interested a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing [More]
Early childhood sleep problems predict later school adjustment

Early childhood sleep problems predict later school adjustment

A child who soothes themselves back to sleep from an early age adjusts to school more easily than those who don't, new QUT research has found. [More]
Orthopaedic care for patients in remote areas can be managed successfully, study finds

Orthopaedic care for patients in remote areas can be managed successfully, study finds

Orthopaedic care for patients living in remote areas may be managed through phone or email, allowing patients to receive treatment without travelling to a larger, urban hospital for care, according to a study presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. [More]
Gender associated with risk of cardiovascular recurrence in adults

Gender associated with risk of cardiovascular recurrence in adults

Sex (biological and physiological characteristics) differences are increasingly being studied to assess symptoms, risk factors and outcomes for various diseases. Now, a new pan-Canadian study led by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, suggests that gender rather than sex is associated with the risk of recurrence of cardiovascular events in adults. [More]
Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

African American and Hispanic adolescents and young adults fare far worse than their white counterparts when faced with a mostly curable type of cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, a study by a UC Davis epidemiologist has found. [More]
No Jab No Pay initiative no problem for families in Cape York

No Jab No Pay initiative no problem for families in Cape York

The government’s No Jab No Pay initiative, effective from 1 January 2016 is set to be no problem for the majority of families in Cape York. [More]
Novel class of antimicrobials could be effective in fighting drug-resistant MRSA infection

Novel class of antimicrobials could be effective in fighting drug-resistant MRSA infection

A novel class of antimicrobials that inhibits the function of a key disease-causing component of bacteria could be effective in fighting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the major drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Child care centers play pivotal role in physical activity levels of preschoolers

Child care centers play pivotal role in physical activity levels of preschoolers

A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds child care centers play a pivotal role when it comes to the physical activity levels of preschoolers. Yet few children get to experience outdoor recess time as it is scheduled. Only 3 in 10 children had at least 60 minutes of a full child-care day outdoors for recess, as is recommended by guidelines. [More]
UGA awarded $8.2 million grant to improve lives of children and families in Georgia' child welfare system

UGA awarded $8.2 million grant to improve lives of children and families in Georgia' child welfare system

A team of University of Georgia faculty members, led by a researcher in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, has received an $8.2 million grant from the Administration for Children and Families, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, to improve the lives of children and families in the child welfare system in Georgia. [More]
Children consume more calories, fewer fruits and vegetables outside of child care centers

Children consume more calories, fewer fruits and vegetables outside of child care centers

A recent study conducted by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center has found that preschool age children are consuming more calories and fewer fruits, vegetables and milk outside of child care centers than what is recommended by the USDA's Child and Adult Care Food Program. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement