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When you are ready to have your baby, you'll go through labor. Contractions let you know labor is starting. When contractions are five minutes apart, your body is ready to push the baby out. During the first stage of labor, your cervix slowly opens, or dilates, to about 4 inches wide. At the same time, it becomes thinner. This is called effacement. You shouldn't push until your uterus is fully effaced and dilated. When it is, the baby delivery stage starts. Crowning is when your baby's scalp comes into view. Shortly afterward, your baby is born. The placenta that nourished the baby follows.

Mothers and babies are monitored closely during labor. Most women are healthy enough to have a baby through normal vaginal delivery, meaning that the baby comes down the birth canal without surgery. If there are complications, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section.
Mediplus develops new silicone pessaries that eliminate clinical risks associated with surgical mesh

Mediplus develops new silicone pessaries that eliminate clinical risks associated with surgical mesh

Women who suffer from incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse from obesity, heavy lifting, smoking, chronic constipation or childbirth don’t always need surgery according to a pioneering British medical device manufacturer. [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]
UWM physicists use novel algorithm to pinpoint moment of conception

UWM physicists use novel algorithm to pinpoint moment of conception

Knowing exactly when an expectant mother conceived helps physicians prepare for life-threatening complications that come with early- and late-term childbirth. [More]

Pelvic prolapse surgery using mesh or graft not more effective than standard technique, study finds

Two controversial methods of surgical repair of prolapse in women have been found to be no more effective than the existing standard repair technique, up to two years after surgery. [More]
Study shows effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training for prevention of prolapse symptoms

Study shows effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training for prevention of prolapse symptoms

Researchers, including several University of Otago academics, have conducted the first trial of pelvic floor muscle training for the prevention of prolapse symptoms in women with early signs of prolapse several years after childbirth, publishing their findings in the world's leading medical journal The Lancet. [More]
Sneezing elicits blinking response to protect the body from germs, says allergist

Sneezing elicits blinking response to protect the body from germs, says allergist

The changing weather brings about many things: holiday excitement, a different wardrobe and—perhaps most annoyingly—cold and flu season. [More]
Woman’s history of drug use can help predict risk of postpartum stress and anxiety

Woman’s history of drug use can help predict risk of postpartum stress and anxiety

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of British Columbia finds that a woman's lifetime history of drug use can help predict whether the woman will suffer from problems with stress and anxiety after childbirth. [More]
Higher maternal age of successful child bearing may be marker of healthy aging

Higher maternal age of successful child bearing may be marker of healthy aging

Death and taxes have long been said to be the only two things guaranteed in life. Exactly when someone will die, in most instances, remains a mystery. [More]
University of Leicester researcher reveals how new mothers turn to online support forums for advice

University of Leicester researcher reveals how new mothers turn to online support forums for advice

Many mothers are bypassing health services and turning to peer-to-peer support forums for advice and support as cuts are made to public funding, according to a researcher from the University of Leicester. [More]
Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Liverpool-led research consortium aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Researchers from the University of Liverpool's Institute of Translational Medicine have been awarded a grant of up to US$ 8.9 million (GBP £5.8m) to lead a multinational research consortium that aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. [More]
Older first-time mothers may have increased chances of living longer

Older first-time mothers may have increased chances of living longer

The average age of a woman giving birth for the first time has risen dramatically in the United States over the past 40 years, driven by factors like education or career. [More]
Gaumard to exhibit new OMNI 2 touch-screen wireless interface at AHA’s Scientific Sessions

Gaumard to exhibit new OMNI 2 touch-screen wireless interface at AHA’s Scientific Sessions

Gaumard Scientific Company will demonstrate how it is transforming CPR training with value-priced simulators and skills trainers into an intuitive tap-and-go experience when the new OMNI 2 touch-screen wireless interface is demonstrated at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions, November 13-15 in booth 2045 at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center. [More]
Women who have not given birth also experience urinary incontinence, study finds

Women who have not given birth also experience urinary incontinence, study finds

Women who have not given birth often end up under the radar for research on urinary incontinence. In a study of this group, however, one in five women over 45 years say they experience this type of incontinence. [More]
Encapsulated placenta may not be good source of dietary iron for postpartum mothers, study finds

Encapsulated placenta may not be good source of dietary iron for postpartum mothers, study finds

Hey new moms, don't put down that can of spinach just yet. A research team led by UNLV medical anthropologists found that eating encapsulated human placenta, a practice known as placentophagy, may not be as good a source of dietary iron for postpartum mothers as proponents suggest. [More]
Authors call for international efforts to end preventable deaths from breast, cervical cancer

Authors call for international efforts to end preventable deaths from breast, cervical cancer

​Every year 800000 women die of cervical and breast cancer, but where a woman lives will largely determine her chance of survival. [More]
Two genes linked to increase in immunity to hepatitis C after childbirth, study shows

Two genes linked to increase in immunity to hepatitis C after childbirth, study shows

Alternative forms of two genes are associated with a boost in immunity to hepatitis C after childbirth, a study led by a Nationwide Children's Hospital physician-researcher shows. [More]
Women who experience pain relief from epidural analgesia less likely to have postpartum depression

Women who experience pain relief from epidural analgesia less likely to have postpartum depression

Epidural anesthesia may do more than relieve pain during labor; in some women it may decrease the likelihood of postpartum depression, suggests a preliminary study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
WHO and partners call for end to discrimination, lack of respect that hinder midwives’ working conditions

WHO and partners call for end to discrimination, lack of respect that hinder midwives’ working conditions

The World Health Organization and partners are calling for an end to the discrimination, harassment and lack of respect that hinder midwives’ ability to provide quality care to women and newborns. [More]
Historical research shows how solitary confinement threatens physical, mental health of prisoners

Historical research shows how solitary confinement threatens physical, mental health of prisoners

Researchers in the Centre for the History of Medicine at the University of Warwick are investigating the impact of solitary confinement in prisons on mental health over the last 150 years, drawing on archival evidence, including the Howard League Archives held at Warwick University's Modern Records Centre, and the memoirs of real prisoners. [More]
Maternal and paternal age linked to child’s risk for developing autism or schizophrenia

Maternal and paternal age linked to child’s risk for developing autism or schizophrenia

A new study published in Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health indicates that parents who reproduce later in life are more likely to have children who develop autism disorders. Later reproduction was not, however, associated with increased risk for schizophrenia in offspring. [More]
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