Children's Health News and Research RSS Feed - Children's Health News and Research

Delayed cord clamping prevents anaemia in infants up to six months of age

Delayed cord clamping prevents anaemia in infants up to six months of age

When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, iron deficiency up to six months of age can be prevented, according to a new study from Uppsala University, published in JAMA Pediatrics. The study was conducted in Nepal. [More]
Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

Genetic testing at UMMC helps doctors identify effective medication for heart stent patients

The University of Maryland Medical Center is now offering a simple genetic test to patients who receive heart stents to determine whether they have a genetic deficiency that affects how they respond to a common drug to prevent blood clots. [More]
Princeton University researchers find disparity in hospital admission rates for publicly insured children

Princeton University researchers find disparity in hospital admission rates for publicly insured children

Hospitals are less likely to admit children covered by public insurance such as Medicaid than privately insured children with similar symptoms, especially when hospitals beds are scarce. [More]
Article reports increase in health care spending on children

Article reports increase in health care spending on children

Health care spending on children grew 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, with the most money spent in 2013 on inpatient well-newborn care, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and well-dental care, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Scientists discover OGDHL and NRD1 genes linked to progressive loss of neurological function

Scientists discover OGDHL and NRD1 genes linked to progressive loss of neurological function

An international team of scientists has discovered that the gene, OGDHL, a key protein required for normal function of the mitochondria -- the energy-producing factory of the cell -- and its chaperone, nardilysin (NRD1) are linked to progressive loss of neurological function in humans. [More]
Study shows effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training for prevention of prolapse symptoms

Study shows effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training for prevention of prolapse symptoms

Researchers, including several University of Otago academics, have conducted the first trial of pelvic floor muscle training for the prevention of prolapse symptoms in women with early signs of prolapse several years after childbirth, publishing their findings in the world's leading medical journal The Lancet. [More]
Sanford study explores protein's role in improving survival of ovarian cancer patients

Sanford study explores protein's role in improving survival of ovarian cancer patients

A Sanford Research lab is studying a protein's role in improving survival in ovarian cancer patients. Findings published in Oncogenesis indicate a higher level of a specific protein correlates with an increased survival rate and decrease in the spreading of cancer cells. [More]
Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). [More]
Nutritional guidelines restricting sugar intake not based on high quality science, study finds

Nutritional guidelines restricting sugar intake not based on high quality science, study finds

Nutritional guidelines restricting sugar intake are not based on high quality science, finds new study led by McMaster University and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids). [More]
New parent home visiting program could reduce need for medical services during first year of child's life

New parent home visiting program could reduce need for medical services during first year of child's life

Infants in families who participated in an intensive new parent home visiting program involving both nurses and lay educators used significantly less medical services during the first year of life, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
Study finds how tumour cells grow through scavenging bad cholesterol

Study finds how tumour cells grow through scavenging bad cholesterol

Several studies have recognized a link between obesity and cancer. Richard Lehner, professor of Pediatrics and investigator at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, has taken his research further to understand how tumour cells grow through scavenging very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), commonly known as the "bad cholesterol", and what mechanisms can be used to reduce the malignant cells' growth. [More]
Pediatricians to discuss children's health issues at AAP National Conference & Exhibition

Pediatricians to discuss children's health issues at AAP National Conference & Exhibition

An expected 10,000 pediatricians and other health care professionals will gather in the nation's capital October 24-27 to deepen their knowledge and widen their scope on child advocacy at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. [More]
Sociologists to explore ideas, scientific research relating to sexuality at ASA's Annual Meeting

Sociologists to explore ideas, scientific research relating to sexuality at ASA's Annual Meeting

More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Chicago this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to sexuality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 110th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Sexualities in the Social World," shows the importance of research by sociologists in illuminating how social norms and social inequalities affect what sexual behavior is acceptable and who partners with whom. [More]
New research shows that risky outdoor play good for children's health

New research shows that risky outdoor play good for children's health

New research from UBC and the Child & Family Research Institute at BC Children's Hospital shows that risky outdoor play is not only good for children's health but also encourages creativity, social skills and resilience. [More]
Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Today in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's (CHOP) PolicyLab published the largest study to date documenting the significant risks to children's health associated with prescription antipsychotics, a powerful a class of medications used to treat mental and behavioral health disorders. [More]
Strengthening Native American families can help improve children’s health

Strengthening Native American families can help improve children’s health

Strengthening Native American families will help improve their children's health—that's the premise behind a research study targeting 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds and their caregivers on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. [More]
Metallic toys, low-cost jewelry can affect children's health

Metallic toys, low-cost jewelry can affect children's health

We know that babies and young children often put non-food items in their mouths, a behaviour that occasionally leads to swallowing of foreign objects. Metallic toys and low-cost jewelry often contain toxic substances such as lead and cadmium. [More]
Experts sound alarm about the dangers of industrial chemicals on children’s health

Experts sound alarm about the dangers of industrial chemicals on children’s health

In a Review published in The Lancet Neurology, two of the world’s leading experts on the link between environment and children’s health are sounding the alarm on the dangers of industrial chemicals. They are calling on countries to transform their chemical risk-assessment procedures in order to protect children from everyday toxins that may be causing a global “silent epidemic” of brain development disorders. [More]
Indoor exposure to radon gas may cause of lung cancer

Indoor exposure to radon gas may cause of lung cancer

Pointing to startling statistics on lung cancer risks, child health and other experts in Canada are ramping up calls for families nationwide to test their homes for radon gas contamination. [More]
New study aims to determine prevalence of pediatric chronic fatigue syndrome in Chicago area youth

New study aims to determine prevalence of pediatric chronic fatigue syndrome in Chicago area youth

The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome in children and the significant impairment it causes to their physical functioning, school attendance and performance, and extracurricular activities, are at the root of a new Chicago-based study led by DePaul University psychologist Leonard A. Jason. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement