Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Study on cancer care offers model for possible lower spending on treatment

Study on cancer care offers model for possible lower spending on treatment

The study, however, raised some questions because while it cut costs by a third and showed no decline in patient health, the spending on chemotherapy medications rose. [More]
AutoGenomics, Genomas sign agreement to develop DNA-guided diagnostic systems

AutoGenomics, Genomas sign agreement to develop DNA-guided diagnostic systems

AutoGenomics, Inc, a leader in automated microarray technology for molecular diagnostics, and Genomas, a biomedical company enabling DNA-guided medicine for personal healthcare, announced today that they have signed an agreement to jointly develop genetic tests and DNA-guided diagnostic systems for optimal selection of statins and for improved delivery of statin therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes. [More]
Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Poor nutrition, health cause disparities in fetal growth and newborn size worldwide

Babies' growth in the womb and their size at birth, especially their length, are strikingly similar the world over - when babies are born to healthy, well-educated and well-nourished mothers. [More]
Standard risk factors stratify already high-risk diabetic patients

Standard risk factors stratify already high-risk diabetic patients

Cardiovascular disease risk factors are associated with mortality even among patients with Type 2 diabetes who are already at high risk due to having high coronary artery calcified plaque, say researchers. [More]
Promising new drug for metabolic syndrome

Promising new drug for metabolic syndrome

University of Utah researchers have discovered that an enzyme involved in intracellular signaling plays a crucial role in developing metabolic syndrome, a finding that has a U of U spinoff company developing a drug to potentially treat the condition. [More]
Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Building upon their earlier research on the biology of fat metabolism, Joslin scientists discovered that microRNAs -small RNA molecules that play important roles in regulation in many types of tissue - play a major role in the distribution and determination of fat cells and whole body metabolism. [More]
Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap vaccinations for whooping cough in Southern California

Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap vaccinations for whooping cough in Southern California

As the number of pertussis cases, also known as whooping cough, reaches epidemic proportions in California, Ralphs Pharmacies continue to offer Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccinations at its 85 in-store pharmacies throughout Southern California. [More]
GNS automated data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome in patients

GNS automated data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome in patients

Research published today in The American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome. [More]
Study calls for more proactive approach towards complete dyslipidemia diagnosis in clinical practice

Study calls for more proactive approach towards complete dyslipidemia diagnosis in clinical practice

Clinical inertia does not allow healthcare professionals to diagnose cholesterol problems in the 65.3% of cases. The results warn of the need to adopt a more proactive attitude towards a complete dyslipidemia diagnosis in routine clinical practice, especially if it is taken into account that it is an illness related to an increase of cardiovascular risk. [More]
Menopause-related changes in sex hormones linked to greater risk for heart disease

Menopause-related changes in sex hormones linked to greater risk for heart disease

As hormone levels change during the transition to menopause, the quality of a woman's cholesterol carriers degrades, leaving her at greater risk for heart disease, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health discovered. [More]
Study finds little progress in reducing disparities among people with disabilities

Study finds little progress in reducing disparities among people with disabilities

Psychological distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of other chronic conditions and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. [More]
Analysis of patient records can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome

Analysis of patient records can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome

Research published today in the American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome. [More]
Weak hospice oversight makes safety problems hard to identify

Weak hospice oversight makes safety problems hard to identify

The typical hospice undergoes a full government inspection about once every six years, according to The Washington Post, making it one of the least scrutinized areas of U.S. health care. [More]
Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries

Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries

A simple non-surgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal Australians. [More]
Hormonal imbalance is not the sole cause of childhood obesity, say experts

Hormonal imbalance is not the sole cause of childhood obesity, say experts

The number of children who are obese remains alarmingly high in the U.S. and, unfortunately, diseases associated with obesity are on the rise. [More]
Street football improves fitness, multiple health markers in homeless men

Street football improves fitness, multiple health markers in homeless men

Research carried out by the Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health in Denmark shows that street football (soccer) improves fitness and multiple health markers in homeless men. [More]
Fatty acids in nuts help reduce risk of CHD in people with type 2 diabetes

Fatty acids in nuts help reduce risk of CHD in people with type 2 diabetes

Findings from a new study published in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases show that the fatty acids in nuts have the potential to help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Women living with diabetes, high cholesterol less likely to reach treatment goals

Women living with diabetes, high cholesterol less likely to reach treatment goals

Queen's University assistant professor Pendar Farahani (Department of Medicine and Department of Public Health Sciences) is advocating the use of gender-based treatment for mitigating the cardiovascular risk factors related to diabetes. [More]
RYGB surgery can help reduce heart disease risk in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes

RYGB surgery can help reduce heart disease risk in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes

Obese patients with Type 2 diabetes who don't have excessive surgical risk may find that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery can help them reduce their risk of heart disease, a new clinical trial shows. [More]
Growth hormone deficiency may protect people from developing Type 2 diabetes, cancer

Growth hormone deficiency may protect people from developing Type 2 diabetes, cancer

People who lack growth hormone (GH) receptors also appear to have marked insulin sensitivity that prevents them from developing diabetes and lowers their risk for cancer, despite their increased percentage of body fat, new research finds. [More]