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Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of Praluent injection meets primary endpoint

Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of Praluent injection meets primary endpoint

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of the investigational therapy Praluent® (alirocumab) Injection met its primary endpoint. [More]
Researchers find way to measure the aging process in young adults

Researchers find way to measure the aging process in young adults

An international research team from the US, UK, Israel and New Zealand has found a way to measure the aging process in young adults -- a younger population than is usually tested in aging studies. [More]
International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

Leukodystrophies are deadly neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in 7,000 children and remain incurable. These genetic diseases attack myelin or the "insulating rubber sheath" surrounding neurons, which leads to deteriorating health for affected children. [More]
Henry Ford Hospital wins Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award

Henry Ford Hospital wins Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award

The Stroke and Neurovascular Disease Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award. [More]
Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Researchers pinpoint two biomarkers elevated in severe form of coronary disease

Insulin resistance affects tens of millions of Americans and is a big risk factor for heart disease. Yet, some people with the condition never develop heart disease, while some experience moderate coronary blockages. Others, though, get severe atherosclerosis - multiple blockages and deterioration of coronary arteries characterized by thick, hard, plaque-ridden arterial walls. [More]
Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation to volanesorsen (ISIS-APOCIIIRx) for the treatment of patients with Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome (FCS). [More]
UTHealth School of Public Health working to improve health of Hispanics living along Texas-Mexico border

UTHealth School of Public Health working to improve health of Hispanics living along Texas-Mexico border

Sylvia Hernando became a Community Health Worker (CHW) because she wanted to help others. Hernando had been a stay-at-home mother and was looking to go back to school when she heard about the CHW certification program at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Researchers analyze cardiometabolic benefits of exercise

Everyone knows that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but much remains unknown about how the benefits arise, and what to expect in different people who exercise to improve their health. To gain a more precise understanding of how exercise improves health and whom it helps most, researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
Eating at full-service restaurants not necessarily healthier than eating at fast-food outlets

Eating at full-service restaurants not necessarily healthier than eating at fast-food outlets

When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home. [More]
Experts call for healthy lifestyle initiatives to combat non-communicable diseases

Experts call for healthy lifestyle initiatives to combat non-communicable diseases

A group of the world's top doctors and scientists working in cardiology and preventive medicine have issued a call to action to tackle the global problem of deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as heart problems, diabetes and cancer, through healthy lifestyle initiatives. [More]
UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

Statins are a hugely popular drug class used to manage blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Previous studies had raised questions about adverse behavioral changes with statins, such as irritability or violence, but findings with statins have been inconsistent. In the first randomized trial to look at statin effects on behavior, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that aggressive behavior typically declined among men placed on statins (compared to placebo), but typically increased among women placed on statins. [More]
Findings highlight benefit of vegan-eating plans for weight loss

Findings highlight benefit of vegan-eating plans for weight loss

People on a vegetarian diet, and especially those following a vegan one that includes no animal products, see better results than dieters on other weight-reducing plans. In fact, they can lose around two kilograms more on the short term, says Ru-Yi Huang of E-Da Hospital in Taiwan after reviewing the results of twelve diet trials. [More]
Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

In a study published this week in Nutrition Journal*, researchers compared risk factors for heart disease and metabolic syndrome of tree nut consumers versus those who did not consume tree nuts. Tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) consumption was associated with lower body mass index (p=0.004), systolic blood pressure (p=0.001), insulin resistance (p=0.043) and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (good cholesterol) (p=0.022). [More]
Experts at West Virginia University welcome FDA’s ban on trans fat

Experts at West Virginia University welcome FDA’s ban on trans fat

West Virginia University experts say the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's mandate to remove artificial trans fats from the country's food supply by 2018 is a long overdue move in the right direction for public health. [More]
New UF study shows that muscadine grape seed oil may provide another clue to reducing obesity

New UF study shows that muscadine grape seed oil may provide another clue to reducing obesity

Muscadine grape seed oil supplies a form of Vitamin E, giving scientists another clue to reducing obesity, a new University of Florida study shows. [More]
UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

University of California, Riverside psychologist Chandra A. Reynolds has been awarded a $7 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study how early childhood influences versus recent influences affect cognitive and physical health by middle age. [More]
Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with a genetic predisposition to high blood pressure have a lower risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

In research published in Cancer Cell, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacology and physiology at Saint Louis University, has, for the first time, found a way to stop cancer cell growth by targeting the Warburg Effect, a trait of cancer cell metabolism that scientists have been eager to exploit. [More]
New report on global market for point of care diagnostics

New report on global market for point of care diagnostics

The market for point of care diagnostics reached $17 billion, in 2014, according to Kalorama Information. The term refers to diagnostic tests performed outside the central laboratory or decentralized. [More]
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