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Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Research breakthrough could help develop tools to repair damaged nerve cells

Research breakthrough could help develop tools to repair damaged nerve cells

A team of researchers at the IRCM led by Frédéric Charron, PhD, in collaboration with bioengineers at McGill University, uncovered a new kind of synergy in the development of the nervous system, which explains an important mechanism required for neural circuits to form properly. [More]
FGF21 protein can boost regenerative effects of human PPARα

FGF21 protein can boost regenerative effects of human PPARα

Researchers at UC Davis have illuminated an important distinction between mice and humans: how human livers heal. The difference centers on a protein called PPARα, which activates liver regeneration. Normally, mouse PPARα is far more active and efficient than the human form, allowing mice to quickly regenerate damaged livers. [More]
China Pharma's revenue decreases 24% to $24.9 million in fiscal year 2014

China Pharma's revenue decreases 24% to $24.9 million in fiscal year 2014

China Pharma Holdings, Inc., an NYSE MKT listed corporation with its fully-integrated specialty pharmaceuticals subsidiary based in China, today announced financial results for the year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
New study finds that walnuts have potential to benefit overall health

New study finds that walnuts have potential to benefit overall health

Multiple new research abstracts suggest walnuts may have the potential to positively affect several important health factors. From their impact on colon cancer and certain aspects of cognitive aging, to their positive effect on both gut health and vascular health, the research findings presented at Experimental Biology 2015 detail our latest understanding of walnuts' inner workings. [More]
Study reveals link between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related health outcomes

Study reveals link between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related health outcomes

A recent analysis published in the Journal of Human Nutrition & Food Science reveals a beneficial relationship between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related outcomes including decreased risk for metabolic syndrome, obesity or overweight, elevated blood pressure, and reduced HDL (good) cholesterol. [More]
Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Useful tips for physicians to help patients make the right choice on statin drugs

Cholesterol-lowering statins have transformed the treatment of heart disease. But while the decision to use the drugs in patients with a history of heart attacks and strokes is mostly clear-cut, that choice can be a far trickier proposition for the tens of millions of Americans with high cholesterol but no overt disease. [More]
Investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may alleviate certain menopause symptoms

Investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may alleviate certain menopause symptoms

The investigational S-equol nutritional supplement may be a viable agent to alleviate certain menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes, according to a new peer-reviewed article in the March Journal of Women's Health. [More]
First global model for predicting CVD risk

First global model for predicting CVD risk

Researchers have developed the first global model for predicting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The model—developed by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Imperial College London, and colleagues—will be of particular help to public health professionals, clinicians, and patients in developing countries for prevention of CVD. [More]
Griffith research examines GPs’ confidence in providing nutritional advice to patients

Griffith research examines GPs’ confidence in providing nutritional advice to patients

The role of nutrition as part of a healthy lifestyle is well understood by the medical profession but whether this information is easily conveyed to patients is another matter. How much confidence GPs have in providing nutritional advice to their patients is now the subject of research by Griffith University’s Dr Lauren Ball. [More]
New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

New tool can measure cardiovascular risk in persons aged 40 or older

For the first time, scientists have developed a new risk score that can predict the 10-year risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke in persons aged 40 years or older in any world country. [More]
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
Migraine headaches with auras may increase risk of stroke

Migraine headaches with auras may increase risk of stroke

People who suffer migraine headaches with auras are at roughly double the risk of suffering the most common type of stroke. [More]
Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Study finds clustered cardiometabolic risk factors in children

Lifestyle-related cardiometabolic risk factors cluster already in children in the same way as in adults, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. A cardiometabolic risk score was used to evaluate cardiometabolic risk in different age groups. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
A new approach to TBI therapy

A new approach to TBI therapy

Innovative angles of attack in research that focus on how the human brain protects and repairs itself will help develop treatments for one of the most common, costly, deadly and scientifically frustrating medical conditions worldwide: traumatic brain injury. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuation of statin therapy may benefit patients with terminal illness

Discontinuing statin use in patients with late-stage cancer and other terminal illnesses may help improve patients' quality of life without causing other adverse health effects, according to a new study by led by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and Duke University and funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). [More]
Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

Home-exercise plan for HIV patients

In addition to antiretroviral medications, people with HIV may soon begin receiving a home exercise plan from their doctors, according to a researcher at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals announces positive results from ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx Phase 1 study

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today positive results from a Phase 1 study with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx. In this study, healthy volunteers treated with ISIS-ANGPTL3Rx achieved dose-dependent, statistically significant reductions in angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) of up to 93 percent with a mean reduction of up to 84 percent from baseline (p<0.001). [More]
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