Cholesterol News and Research RSS Feed - Cholesterol News and Research

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver, and found in the blood and in all cells of the body. Cholesterol is important for good health and is needed for making cell walls, tissues, hormones, vitamin D, and bile acid. Cholesterol also comes from eating foods taken from animals such as egg yolks, meat, and whole-milk dairy products. Too much cholesterol in the blood may build up in blood vessel walls, block blood flow to tissues and organs, and increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.
Studies reveal long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery in severely obese teenagers

Studies reveal long-term effects of gastric bypass surgery in severely obese teenagers

Gastric bypass surgery helps severely obese teenagers lose weight and keep it off, according to the first long-term follow-up studies of teenagers who had undergone the procedure 5-12 years earlier. [More]
Stanford researchers launch major update to popular research app for sharing heart health data

Stanford researchers launch major update to popular research app for sharing heart health data

Resolved to improve your heart health in the new year? A newly updated app could keep you on track. [More]
Physical activity linked to decreased risk of heart disease and death from all causes in older adults

Physical activity linked to decreased risk of heart disease and death from all causes in older adults

Being physically inactive--sitting for long periods of time--can be so harmful to your health that experts sometimes call it "sitting disease." In fact, worldwide, physical inactivity is estimated to cause some 3.2 million deaths a year. [More]
Why WAIT program offers new hope to obese patients with diabetes

Why WAIT program offers new hope to obese patients with diabetes

Joslin Diabetes Center's intensive life-style intervention program for obese patients with diabetes continues to offer health benefits for participants five years after they begin the intervention, a new study demonstrates. [More]
Natural antioxidant can protect offspring of obese mice from NAFLD, study shows

Natural antioxidant can protect offspring of obese mice from NAFLD, study shows

A common antioxidant found in human breast milk and foods like kiwi fruit can protect against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the offspring of obese mice, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Commercial program that offers diet and exercise leads to greater improvements in metabolic syndrome

Commercial program that offers diet and exercise leads to greater improvements in metabolic syndrome

If losing weight is on your list of New Year resolutions, be sure to include both diet and exercise. [More]
Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

You've likely heard about being in the right place at the wrong time, but what about having the right genes in the wrong environment? In other words, could a genetic mutation (or allele) that puts populations at risk for illnesses in one environmental setting manifest itself in positive ways in a different setting? [More]
Fenofibrate drug may reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

Fenofibrate drug may reduce risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes

A new study shows that the drug fenofibrate might reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes who have high levels of triglycerides and low levels of "good" cholesterol, despite being treated with statins. [More]
People with increased risk for heart disease could more likely have shoulder problems

People with increased risk for heart disease could more likely have shoulder problems

After all the lifting, hauling and wrapping, worn out gift givers may blame the season's physical strain for any shoulder soreness they are feeling. [More]
Saint Louis University geriatrician urges older patients to talk to doctors about too many pills

Saint Louis University geriatrician urges older patients to talk to doctors about too many pills

If you're 65 or older and taking more than four medications, resolve to talk to your doctor about doing a New Year's triage to make sure too many pills aren't making you sick, advises Milta Little, D.O., associate professor of geriatrics at Saint Louis University. [More]
Linking human genome sequences to EHR information could influence clinical medicine, says expert

Linking human genome sequences to EHR information could influence clinical medicine, says expert

The value of intersecting the sequencing of individuals' exomes or full genomes to find rare genetic variants -- on a large scale -- with their detailed electronic health record information has "myriad benefits, including the illumination of basic human biology, the early identification of preventable and treatable illnesses, and the identification and validation of new therapeutic targets," wrote Daniel J. Rader, MD, chair of the Department of Genetics, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in Science this week, with Scott M. Damrauer, MD, an assistant professor of Surgery at Penn and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia. [More]
Weight loss leads to improvements in psoriasis symptoms and quality of life

Weight loss leads to improvements in psoriasis symptoms and quality of life

Weight loss has a significant and prolonged positive impact on psoriasis symptoms and quality of life. [More]
A Chain of Life for a Rare Neurodegenerative Disease

A Chain of Life for a Rare Neurodegenerative Disease

Researchers in Japan have improved a potential treatment for a rare genetic disease, decreasing its negative toxic effects by threading it onto a dumb-bell-shaped chain and holding it in place until it reaches its target. [More]
Vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice

Vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice

It is well known that a diet high in fat can trigger a metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms that pose as risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. [More]
Technology could help improve health care quality

Technology could help improve health care quality

Technology has promised to transform health care for years now. Multiple apps, devices, and other e-health approaches are being created to help the patient increase their awareness, education and accountability in their own health. [More]
Red meat consumption does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, review suggests

Red meat consumption does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, review suggests

Consuming red meat in amounts above what is typically recommended does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as blood pressure and blood cholesterol, according to a new review of clinical trials from Purdue University. [More]
Tips for heart health and wellness during the holidays

Tips for heart health and wellness during the holidays

Every year, there's often a shortage of platelet and blood donations during the holidays. This year, a number of factors have made the need for blood platelets especially urgent. [More]
Reducing cholesterol to level of newborn baby lowers cardiovascular disease risk, research finds

Reducing cholesterol to level of newborn baby lowers cardiovascular disease risk, research finds

Reducing our cholesterol levels to those of a new-born baby significantly lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research. [More]
Turning off 'fat-specific protein 27' improves blood sugar levels, reduces body fat in animal model

Turning off 'fat-specific protein 27' improves blood sugar levels, reduces body fat in animal model

In a study published in the Journal of Lipid Research, Saint Louis University scientist Angel Baldan, Ph.D., reports that turning off a protein found in liver and adipose tissue significantly improves blood sugar levels, as well as reduces body fat in an animal model. [More]
People with protein in urine more likely to develop memory problems, dementia

People with protein in urine more likely to develop memory problems, dementia

People who have protein in their urine, which is a sign of kidney problems, may also be more likely to later develop problems with thinking and memory skills or even dementia, according to a meta-analysis published in the December 14, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
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