Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease News and Research

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has described Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) as a global epidemic; an estimated 210 million people have COPD worldwide and more than 3 million people died of the condition in 2005, which is equal to 5% of all deaths globally that year. Total deaths from COPD are projected to increase by more than 30% in the next 10 years without interventions to cut risks, particularly exposure to tobacco smoke.
New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

New study describes way to regenerate lung tissue after injury

A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought. [More]
LA BioMed scientist awarded $80,000 to study effectiveness of pulmonary rehab in treating COPD

LA BioMed scientist awarded $80,000 to study effectiveness of pulmonary rehab in treating COPD

The ATS Foundation and Breathe California of Los Angeles have awarded $80,000 to Harry Rossiter, PhD, a lead researcher at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, to study the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in reducing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms in an underserved population in Los Angeles. [More]
New ERS and ATS statement highlights current state, future research directions in COPD

New ERS and ATS statement highlights current state, future research directions in COPD

The European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society have published a statement describing the current evidence on the diagnosis, assessment and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), identifying gaps in knowledge and making recommendations for the directions of future research. [More]
COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

COPD patients receiving home oxygen have higher risk of burn injury

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury. This study was published on March 30 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars and the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, announces the availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada, the country's first subsequent entry biologic (SEB) monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy. [More]
Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Penn surgeons develop new tools to identify joint replacement patients at risk for serious complications

Orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed two new prediction tools aimed at identifying total hip and knee replacement patients who are at-risk of developing serious complications after surgery. [More]
Egalet announces plans to commercialize SPRIX Nasal Spray and OXAYDO tablets

Egalet announces plans to commercialize SPRIX Nasal Spray and OXAYDO tablets

Egalet Corporation, a fully integrated specialty pharmaceutical company focused on developing, manufacturing and marketing innovative pain treatments, today announced its plans for the commercialization of SPRIX (ketorolac tromethamine) Nasal Spray and OXAYDO (oxycodone HCI, USP) tablets for oral use only –CII. [More]
Study explains why COPD patients develop tolerance to roflumilast drug

Study explains why COPD patients develop tolerance to roflumilast drug

Roflumilast, a drug recently approved in the United States to treat severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), increases the production of a protein that causes inflammation, which possibly results in patients developing a tolerance to the drug after repeated use and makes the drug less effective, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Kumamoto University and the University of Rochester Medical Center. [More]
Oxygen wristbands: an interview with Dr Gillian Lowrey

Oxygen wristbands: an interview with Dr Gillian Lowrey

Oxygen is delivered with variable flows that administer different concentrations. National guidelines were published in 2009 that provide recommendations about prescribing the oxygen and titrating it to certain target ranges. [More]
New research lays groundwork for developing treatments for asthma, COPD

New research lays groundwork for developing treatments for asthma, COPD

In diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the body produces too much mucus, making breathing difficult. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis provides clues to potentially counteract inappropriate mucus production. [More]
Egalet announces net revenues of $1.9 million for 2014

Egalet announces net revenues of $1.9 million for 2014

Egalet Corporation today reported financial results for the year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
Ruthigen, Pulmatrix sign definitive merger agreement

Ruthigen, Pulmatrix sign definitive merger agreement

Ruthigen, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company, and Pulmatrix, Inc., a Lexington, Massachusetts based clinical stage biotechnology company, announced today that on March 13, 2015, they have entered into a definitive merger agreement. [More]
New study explores patient outcomes one year after TAVR procedure

New study explores patient outcomes one year after TAVR procedure

In an analysis of outcomes of about 12,000 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement, death rate after one year was nearly one in four; of those alive at 12 months, almost half had not been rehospitalized and approximately 25 percent had only one hospitalization, according to a study in the March 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Rehospitalizations after severe sepsis may be potentially preventable

Rehospitalizations after severe sepsis may be potentially preventable

In an analysis of about 2,600 hospitalizations for severe sepsis, readmissions within 90 days were common, and approximately 40 percent occurred for diagnoses that could potentially be prevented or treated early to avoid hospitalization, according to a study in the March 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
New study assesses suicide risks in older, white males with advanced bladder cancer

New study assesses suicide risks in older, white males with advanced bladder cancer

Older, single white males with advanced bladder cancer have the highest suicide risk among those with other cancers of the male genitals and urinary system, researchers report. [More]
Study explores outcomes of lung transplantations after implementing need-based allocation system

Study explores outcomes of lung transplantations after implementing need-based allocation system

Since implementation of a medical need-based allocation system of donor lungs in 2005, double-lung transplantation has been associated with better graft survival than single-lung transplantation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); at 5 years, there has been no survival difference between single- and double-lung transplant recipients in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
World class drug discovery team launches new company to tackle chronic respiratory disease

World class drug discovery team launches new company to tackle chronic respiratory disease

Respiratory diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and severe asthma represent a major unmet medical need and a significant health burden in both the developed and developing world. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]

New Breathe NIOV System uses Bayer’s injection-molded Makrolon polycarbonate

Imagine not being able to climb the stairs without stopping to take a break, or getting winded trying to stand and do the dishes. Unfortunately these are common realities for individuals suffering from respiratory conditions. Ventilators can help reduce the work of breathing by unloading the ancillary respiratory muscles, but they are often bulky and heavy, creating additional limitations for users. The Breathe Non-Invasive Open Ventilation (NIOV) System technology is a better solution. [More]
UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

UM SOM launches ‘Program in Lung Healing’ to develop treatments for acute respiratory failure

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, and Jeffrey A. Rivest, MS, President and Chief Executive Officer of University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), today announced the official launch of a new "Program in Lung Healing," that will further the School's position as a national leader in research, education and clinical innovation for acute ailments of the lung and respiratory system. [More]
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