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Survey provides no evidence that depressive symptoms vary from season to season

Survey provides no evidence that depressive symptoms vary from season to season

A large-scale survey of U.S. adults provides no evidence that levels of depressive symptoms vary from season to season, according to new research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings are inconsistent with the notion of seasonal depression as a commonly occurring disorder. [More]
Growing up in poverty could alter children's brain connectivity, increase risk of depression

Growing up in poverty could alter children's brain connectivity, increase risk of depression

Many negative consequences are linked to growing up poor, and researchers at Washington University St. Louis have identified one more: altered brain connectivity. [More]

Clinical depression during early childhood can change the brain's anatomy

The brains of children who suffer clinical depression as preschoolers develop abnormally, compared with the brains of preschoolers unaffected by the disorder, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Two-drug combination relieves depression in older adults

Two-drug combination relieves depression in older adults

More than half of older adults with clinical depression don't get better when treated with an antidepressant. But results from a multicenter clinical trial that included Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that adding a second drug — an antipsychotic medication — to the treatment regimen helps many of those patients. [More]
People with specific genotype are more deeply affected by life experiences, reveals study

People with specific genotype are more deeply affected by life experiences, reveals study

People with a certain type of gene are more deeply affected by their life experiences, a new study has revealed. [More]
Women who become mothers following fertility treatment face increased risk of depression

Women who become mothers following fertility treatment face increased risk of depression

Women giving birth after undergoing fertility treatment face an increased risk of depression compared to women ending up not having a child following fertility treatment, according to new research from the University of Copenhagen. According to the researchers, this has key implications for fertility treatment in future. [More]
Prion protein could play a role in depression

Prion protein could play a role in depression

The discovery of antidepressant drugs in the 1950s led to the first biochemical hypothesis of depression, known as the monoamine hypothesis. This hypothesis proposes that an imbalance of certain brain chemicals is the key cause of depression. [More]
DISC-1: schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene? An interview with Professor Kevin Fox

DISC-1: schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene? An interview with Professor Kevin Fox

The DISC-1 gene has been studied intensively over the years because people with mutations in DISC1 have a high likelihood of mental illness. DISC-1 was known to be associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major clinical depression and autism. [More]
Study: Unsuccessful fertility treatment not linked with increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression in women

Study: Unsuccessful fertility treatment not linked with increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression in women

An analysis of data on more than 41,000 Danish women who received assisted reproductive fertility treatment shows that unsuccessful treatment is not linked with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed depression compared with successful treatment. [More]
Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Scientists have identified a critical function of what they believe to be schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene that could hold the key to decoding the function of all genes involved in the disease. [More]
Person-centered approach to physical therapy has positive effect on depression

Person-centered approach to physical therapy has positive effect on depression

Exercise has a positive effect on depression - so reveals a dissertation written at the Sahlgrenska Academy. In at study at the Sahlgrenska Academy, the researcher evaluated exercise as add-on therapy to medicating with antidepressants. The study divided 62 individuals with diagnosed clinical depression into three groups, in which two participated in two different types of exercise with a physiotherapist twice a week for 10 weeks while the third, the control group, did not participate in systematic exercise. [More]
Greater evidence-based help needed for depressed workers - New report from The Work Foundation

Greater evidence-based help needed for depressed workers - New report from The Work Foundation

A report from Lancaster University’s Work Foundation recommends that in order to improve both productivity and health and wellbeing among those of working age, more concerted action must be taken to support people with depression to stay in and to return to work... [More]
OSU researchers find link between low levels of vitamin D and depression in young women

OSU researchers find link between low levels of vitamin D and depression in young women

A new study from Oregon State University suggests there is a relationship between low levels of vitamin D and depression in otherwise healthy young women. [More]
Mice genetically deficient in serotonin are more vulnerable to social stressors

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin are more vulnerable to social stressors

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin -- a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression -- are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors, according to a Duke study appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Brain scans can predict therapeutic responses to talk therapy

Brain scans can predict therapeutic responses to talk therapy

UNC School of Medicine researchers have shown that brain scans can predict which patients with clinical depression are most likely to benefit from a specific kind of talk therapy. [More]
Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

A new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health found that the measure of brain inflammation in people who were experiencing clinical depression was increased by 30 per cent. The findings, published today in JAMA Psychiatry, have important implications for developing new treatments for depression. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

An international research team led by physician-scientists at Rush University Medical Center have gained new insights into hypothyroidism - a condition affecting about 10 million people in the U.S. - that may lead to new treatment protocols for the disease, particularly among the approximately 15 percent of patients for whom standard treatments are less effective. [More]
Laughing gas could be used as treatment for severe depression

Laughing gas could be used as treatment for severe depression

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don't respond to standard therapies. The pilot study, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is believed to be the first research in which patients with depression were given laughing gas. [More]
Pathological guilt in preschool years linked to brain changes, increases risk for recurrent depression

Pathological guilt in preschool years linked to brain changes, increases risk for recurrent depression

In school-age children previously diagnosed with depression as preschoolers, a key brain region involved in emotion is smaller than in their peers who were not depressed, scientists have shown. [More]
Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at increased risk of converting to Alzheimer's disease within a few years, but a new study warns the risk increases significantly if they suffer from anxiety. [More]
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