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Scientists alter emotional associations of specific memories

Scientists alter emotional associations of specific memories

By manipulating neural circuits in the brain of mice, scientists have altered the emotional associations of specific memories. [More]
Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

Study confirms close link between immune system and adult neurogenesis

A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Soderhall of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. [More]
Weight loss improves physical health, but takes toll on mental health

Weight loss improves physical health, but takes toll on mental health

Weight loss significantly improves physical health but effects on mental health are less straightforward, finds new UCL research funded by Cancer Research UK. [More]

Research results in new insights into clinical depression

Research led by the University of Adelaide has resulted in new insights into clinical depression that demonstrate there cannot be a "one-size-fits-all" approach to treating the disease. [More]
Epigenetic control of serotonin transporter predicts human brain function

Epigenetic control of serotonin transporter predicts human brain function

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain responds to threats, according to a new study by Duke University researchers. [More]
Massage therapy can alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis

Massage therapy can alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis

An estimated 2.3 million people worldwide live with multiple sclerosis (MS) each day, a debilitating disease that can often cause severe pain, muscle spasms, poor circulation, anxiety, stress and clinical depression. [More]
Researchers find link between genetic makeup and nation's happiness

Researchers find link between genetic makeup and nation's happiness

Genetics could be the key to explaining nation's levels of happiness, according to research from the University of Warwick. [More]
New approach can reduce depression in patients with AMD-related low vision

New approach can reduce depression in patients with AMD-related low vision

Depression is a common risk for people who have lost their vision from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but a new study shows that a type of rehabilitation therapy can cut this risk in half. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Cedars-Sinai nurses screening hospitalized patients for signs of depression

Cedars-Sinai nurses screening hospitalized patients for signs of depression

In an effort to identify and treat patients with undiagnosed depression, Cedars-Sinai nurses are screening each hospitalized patient for signs of the illness and for risk factors that could make recoveries harder and longer. [More]
New study suggests easy, effective way to alleviate negative effects of bad memories

New study suggests easy, effective way to alleviate negative effects of bad memories

What's one of your worst memories? How did it make you feel? According to psychologists, remembering the emotions felt during a negative personal experience, such as how sad you were or how embarrassed you felt, can lead to emotional distress, especially when you can't stop thinking about it. [More]
How do people become depressed? An interview with Anna Watters and Professor Lea Williams, University of Sydney

How do people become depressed? An interview with Anna Watters and Professor Lea Williams, University of Sydney

A clinical diagnosis of depression (i.e. major depressive disorder) is currently defined on the basis of reported symptoms. [More]
Researchers identify first biomarker for major depression

Researchers identify first biomarker for major depression

Teenage boys who show a combination of depressive symptoms and elevated levels of the 'stress hormone' cortisol are up to fourteen times more likely to develop major depression than those who show neither trait, according to research funded by the Wellcome Trust. [More]
Depression in childhood may increase risk of heart problems later in life

Depression in childhood may increase risk of heart problems later in life

Children with depression are more likely to be obese, smoke and be inactive, and can show the effects of heart disease as early as their teen years, according to a newly published study by University of South Florida Associate Professor of Psychology Jonathan Rottenberg. [More]
Psychiatrist offers tips for dealing with holiday stress and sadness problems of the season

Psychiatrist offers tips for dealing with holiday stress and sadness problems of the season

During the holidays, the goal should be to set the course somewhere "between Hallmark and heartache," a Vanderbilt psychiatrist says. In other words, don't strive for the perfect (you won't achieve it), and recognize and deal head-on with some of the stressors of the season. [More]
Inactive patients following cardiac surgery have higher risk of depression

Inactive patients following cardiac surgery have higher risk of depression

New research indicates that inactive patients following cardiac surgery have a substantially higher risk of depression and that the number of patients suffering from depression after cardiac surgery is as high as 40%. Investigators recommend that cardiac patients should be assessed for depression and level of physical activity and remain as active as they safely can after surgery to minimize post-operative depression. The results are published in the December issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. [More]
Women who take shorter maternity leave may have increased risk of postpartum depression

Women who take shorter maternity leave may have increased risk of postpartum depression

​The more leave time from work that a woman takes after giving birth -- up to six months -- the better protected she will be from experiencing post-partum depression, according to a study led by Dr. Rada K. Dagher, assistant professor of health services administration at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]
Research: New mechanisms and areas of brain linked with anxiety and depression

Research: New mechanisms and areas of brain linked with anxiety and depression

Research released today reveals new mechanisms and areas of the brain associated with anxiety and depression, presenting possible targets to understand and treat these debilitating mental illnesses. [More]
Clinical depression common in elderly men with LUTS

Clinical depression common in elderly men with LUTS

A study of Chinese elderly men with moderate-to-severe lower urinary tract symptoms shows that they are significantly more likely to experience clinical depression than men with milder symptoms. [More]
Study: Depression in Parkinson's patients may reflect impaired striatal dopamine function

Study: Depression in Parkinson's patients may reflect impaired striatal dopamine function

According to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, up to 60% of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit mild to moderate depression, which is often underdiagnosed. [More]
Depression in Parkinson's disease people associated with reduced dopamine synthesis capacity

Depression in Parkinson's disease people associated with reduced dopamine synthesis capacity

According to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, up to 60% of individuals with Parkinson's disease exhibit mild to moderate depression, which is often underdiagnosed. It is unclear whether depression results from having a debilitating disease or reflects a parallel abnormal change in the brain caused by PD pathophysiology. [More]