Clostridium Difficile News and Research RSS Feed - Clostridium Difficile News and Research

Clostridium difficile is a type of bacterium found in human and animal waste. Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea that occurs in hospitals. It can also cause diarrhea or other intestinal disorders in patients treated with antibiotics.
Allergan announces positive results from AVYCAZ Phase III studies for treatment of cUTI

Allergan announces positive results from AVYCAZ Phase III studies for treatment of cUTI

Allergan plc. today announced positive topline results from RECAPTURE 1 and 2, the pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the antibiotic AVYCAZ (ceftazidime-avibactam) as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

Allergan plc today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). [More]
Probiotics do not help prevent gastrointestinal colonization with MDROs in critically ill patients

Probiotics do not help prevent gastrointestinal colonization with MDROs in critically ill patients

Probiotics show no benefit for preventing or eliminating gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant organisms in patients in the intensive care unit compared to standard care, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Compared with routine medical care, probiotics administered to critically ill patients in intensive care units showed no benefit in preventing the colonization of drug-resistant microbes in the intestinal tract, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
No single genetic strain associated with the worst cases of C. difficile infections

No single genetic strain associated with the worst cases of C. difficile infections

No single genetic strain of the widespread Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) bacteria appears to be any more harmful than other strains, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Analysis of toilet waste from international aircraft may lead to global surveillance of infectious diseases

Analysis of toilet waste from international aircraft may lead to global surveillance of infectious diseases

Current international disease surveillance systems are mainly based on reports made by doctors after treatment of infected patients. As a consequence, disease-causing microorganisms and resistance bacteria have time to spread and make large population groups sick before they are detected. [More]
U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

With every breath you take, microbes have a chance of making it into your lungs. But what happens when they get there? And why do dangerous lung infections like pneumonia happen in some people, but not others? Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have started to answer these questions by studying the microbiome of the lungs - the community of microscopic organisms that are in constant contact with our respiratory system. [More]
Major gaps found in existing evidence for best practices for cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent HAIs

Major gaps found in existing evidence for best practices for cleaning hospital room surfaces to prevent HAIs

Tray tables, bed rails, light switches, and toilets: All are common vectors for swapping germs between patients and health care workers. While a new systematic overview in this week's Annals of Internal Medicine points to several promising cleaning tactics of these "high-touch surfaces," there's a lack of evidence as to which is the most effective at reducing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating "superbugs" able to resist drugs treating infection. [More]
Hospitals can make patients sick, reveals Consumer Reports

Hospitals can make patients sick, reveals Consumer Reports

Hospitals are thought to be sterile, safe environments where sick people get better, not sicker. But that's not always the case according to a new investigation by Consumer Reports into hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Mix of bacteria living in guts may band together to ward off dangerous infections

Mix of bacteria living in guts may band together to ward off dangerous infections

Like a collection of ragtag villagers fighting off an invading army, the mix of bacteria that live in our guts may band together to keep dangerous infections from taking hold, new research suggests. [More]

MGB Biopharma begins MGB-BP-3 Phase I clinical trial for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections

MGB Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing a truly novel class of anti-infectives, to address the major global problem of antibiotic resistance today announces that the first group of healthy male volunteers have been dosed in a Phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and tolerability of an oral formulation of MGB-BP-3, for use in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections. [More]
UTHealth scientist receives $1.9 million from NIH to develop non-antibiotic treatment for C. diff infections

UTHealth scientist receives $1.9 million from NIH to develop non-antibiotic treatment for C. diff infections

Charles Darkoh, Ph.D., a researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, was recently awarded a five-year, $1.9 million R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health to develop a non-antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections. [More]
New collection of papers adds to mounting evidence of gut microbiome’s influential role in health

New collection of papers adds to mounting evidence of gut microbiome’s influential role in health

A newly released collection of papers, the result of the Gut in Focus Symposium Nobel Forum held earlier this year, is adding to the mounting evidence of the influential role the gut microbiome plays in health. [More]
IPs spend more time in collecting and reporting hospital infection data than protecting patients

IPs spend more time in collecting and reporting hospital infection data than protecting patients

Collecting and reporting hospital infection data to federal health agencies takes more than 5 hours each day, at the expense of time needed to ensure that frontline healthcare personnel are adhering to basic infection prevention practices such as hand hygiene, according to a recent case study, to be presented on Saturday, June 27 at the 42nd Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Stable IV formulation to treat systemic susceptible and resistant Gram-positive hospital-acquired infections

Stable IV formulation to treat systemic susceptible and resistant Gram-positive hospital-acquired infections

MGB Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing a truly novel class of anti-infectives, to address the major global problem of antibiotic resistance - announces that it has developed a stable intravenous (IV) formulation of MGB-BP-3, designed for the treatment of systemic susceptible and resistant Gram-positive hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Salix Pharmaceuticals receives FDA approval for Xifaxan 550 mg to treat IBS-D in adults

Salix Pharmaceuticals receives FDA approval for Xifaxan 550 mg to treat IBS-D in adults

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, Salix Pharmaceuticals, Inc., has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Xifaxan 550 mg for the treatment of IBS-D in adults. [More]
Roche announces FDA clearance for cobas Cdiff Test to detect C. difficile in stool specimens

Roche announces FDA clearance for cobas Cdiff Test to detect C. difficile in stool specimens

Roche announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has provided 510(k) clearance for the cobas Cdiff Test to detect Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) in stool specimens. [More]

CSGI joins with two California hospitals to eradicate deadly Clostridium difficile infections

Clean Sweep Group Inc., a Beverly Hills, CA, based microbial disinfection service company, joins with two California hospitals to significantly reduce deadly Clostridium difficile infections caught in their hospitals using ultraviolet (UV-C) germ-killing advanced disinfection devices. [More]

Treatment significantly reduces risk of CDI recurrence

Among patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) who recovered following standard treatment with the antibiotics metronidazole or vancomycin, oral administration of spores of a strain of C difficile that does not produce toxins colonized the gastrointestinal tract and significantly reduced CDI recurrence, according to a study in the May 5 issue of JAMA. [More]
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