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Study on cancer care offers model for possible lower spending on treatment

Study on cancer care offers model for possible lower spending on treatment

The study, however, raised some questions because while it cut costs by a third and showed no decline in patient health, the spending on chemotherapy medications rose. [More]
Prescription drug deaths drop in Fla. after crackdown on doctors

Prescription drug deaths drop in Fla. after crackdown on doctors

Deaths involving narcotic painkillers dropped 26 percent over two years in Florida after stricter doctor scrutiny, according to a report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Backpack-sized device can perform highly accurate and sensitive cocaine testing in 15 minutes

Backpack-sized device can perform highly accurate and sensitive cocaine testing in 15 minutes

Testing for cocaine and other drugs usually involves two steps: a quick on-site prescreen, and then a more accurate confirmatory test at a distant laboratory. [More]
Braeburn announces new clinical trial for Probuphine based on clear guidance from FDA

Braeburn announces new clinical trial for Probuphine based on clear guidance from FDA

Braeburn Pharmaceuticals announced today the initiation of a new clinical trial for Probuphine® based on clear guidance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The study, which was submitted for FDA review in mid-March, is expected to begin enrollment by mid-year and to be completed by the middle of 2015. [More]
Children get codeine in U.S. emergency rooms, despite risks: Study

Children get codeine in U.S. emergency rooms, despite risks: Study

Despite its potentially harmful effects in children, codeine continues to be prescribed in U.S. emergency rooms, according to new research from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco. [More]
Prescriptions of opioid analgesics increased during U.S. emergency department visits

Prescriptions of opioid analgesics increased during U.S. emergency department visits

George Washington University (GW) researchers report dramatic increases in prescriptions of opioid analgesics, such as Percocet, Vicodin, oxycodone and Dilaudid, during U.S. emergency department visits from 2001 to 2010. [More]
Nurses in emergency care must be trained to recognise symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia

Nurses in emergency care must be trained to recognise symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia

Nurses working in emergency care environments must be trained to recognise the atypical signs and symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia. [More]
Study reveals that more than 14% of pregnant women are prescribed opioids for pain

Study reveals that more than 14% of pregnant women are prescribed opioids for pain

More than 14 percent of pregnant women were prescribed opioids (narcotics) for pain at some time during their pregnancy, according to a study posted to the online version of Anesthesiology. [More]
E.R. expert warns public about 5 things doctor may do wrong when treating for flu

E.R. expert warns public about 5 things doctor may do wrong when treating for flu

The flu season is in full swing starting mostly in the second week of January when emergency rooms are more busy than usual with patient with flu like symptoms. Dr. James Kojian, E.R. expert and founder of DRTOHELP.COM, warns the public about five things your doctor may be doing wrong when treating for the flu. [More]
Chemists able to trace narcotics substances, prescription drugs in Swedish wastewater

Chemists able to trace narcotics substances, prescription drugs in Swedish wastewater

Chemists at Ume- University in Sweden have been able to trace narcotics substances and prescription drugs in measurements of wastewater from 33 Swedish sewage treatment plants. Cocaine, amphetamine, and methamphetamine, in measurable concentrations, were found in a total of half of the locations. [More]

Access to health care increases prescription opioid abuse

Researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis say one way to gauge the extent of prescription opioid pain reliever abuse in any Indiana county is to count the number of health care providers, particularly dentists and pharmacists. [More]
New Centre for Stratified Medicine opened in Ireland

New Centre for Stratified Medicine opened in Ireland

The University of Ulster has opened a new Centre for Stratified Medicine. The only Centre of its kind in Ireland, £11.5m research facility in Derry~Londonderry puts the University at the forefront of medical research into chronic degenerative diseases. [More]
Use of IV acetaminophen with narcotics reduces pain in children with tonsillectomies

Use of IV acetaminophen with narcotics reduces pain in children with tonsillectomies

Using intravenous acetaminophen with narcotics provides more effective pain relief to children having tonsillectomies, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2013 annual meeting. [More]
Metabolic enzymes in opium poppy are used to produce valuable painkilling drugs

Metabolic enzymes in opium poppy are used to produce valuable painkilling drugs

​University of Calgary scientists have discovered metabolic enzymes in the opium poppy that play "widespread roles" in enabling the plant to make painkilling morphine and codeine, and other important compounds. [More]
Over-the-counter ibuprofen appears to be safest alternative for reducing post-operative pain

Over-the-counter ibuprofen appears to be safest alternative for reducing post-operative pain

You may be able to eat all of the ice cream you want after having your tonsils removed, but researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit say you don't necessarily need a prescription to reduce post-operative pain -- an over-the-counter pain-reliever is just as effective. [More]
Genetic discovery could take guesswork out of prescribing correct dose of drugs

Genetic discovery could take guesswork out of prescribing correct dose of drugs

The discovery of genetic differences affecting up to a third of the population could take the guesswork out of prescribing the correct dose of 25 percent of drugs currently on the market, researchers say. [More]
Using large doses of codeine may heighten sensitivity to pain

Using large doses of codeine may heighten sensitivity to pain

Using large and frequent doses of the pain-killer codeine may actually produce heightened sensitivity to pain, without the same level of relief offered by morphine, according to new research from the University of Adelaide. [More]

Few physicians receive adequate training to help patients with chronic pain

Pain is the most common reason a patient sees a physician but few physicians have received adequate training to help their patients, according to a Henry Ford Hospital article published in the Journal of American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Severe arthritis pain treatments: an interview with Professor Walsh, University of Nottingham and Professor Wood, UCL

Severe arthritis pain treatments: an interview with Professor Walsh, University of Nottingham and Professor Wood, UCL

Pain is defined by the sufferer’s experience. Pain may be severe because it is intense, frequent or sustained, and because it is distressing. The severity of pain is not simply due to what is going on in the joint, but is also affected by how the body processes the pain signals, and the context in which it is experienced. [More]
Poor, less educated patients are less likely to receive opioid pain medications in emergency rooms

Poor, less educated patients are less likely to receive opioid pain medications in emergency rooms

Patients in moderate to severe pain in emergency rooms across the U.S. are less likely to receive opioid pain medications if they are black, Hispanic, poor, or have less education, compared to more affluent patients, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study reported in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]