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Helping relieve headaches in school-aged children

Helping relieve headaches in school-aged children

As the school year approaches and begins, many parents may start to hear their children complain about headaches. [More]
Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for insomnia with psychiatric and medical conditions

Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for insomnia with psychiatric and medical conditions

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a widely used nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorders and an analysis of the medical literature by sleep researchers at Rush University Medical Center suggests it also can work for patients whose insomnia is coupled with psychiatric and medical conditions, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Two antioxidant supplements effective in treating mice with skin-picking disorder

Two antioxidant supplements effective in treating mice with skin-picking disorder

Two antioxidant supplements are effective in treating skin-picking disorder in mice, according to a study led by a Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

A specific type of talk therapy dispensed in the developing world to orphans and other vulnerable children who experienced trauma such as sexual and domestic abuse showed dramatic results, despite being administered by workers with little education, new research shows. [More]
Cognitive behavioral therapy can help patients with severe dental anxiety

Cognitive behavioral therapy can help patients with severe dental anxiety

Adults who suffer from severe dental anxiety (DA) are often dissatisfied with their appearance. The dissatisfaction may be associated with poorer oral health, depression and anxiety. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy found that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) help patients with severe DA. [More]
UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

Numerous studies have shown that African Americans and Hispanics are less likely than Caucasians to quit smoking, even if they participate in cessation interventions. [More]
Fibromyalgia now considered as a lifelong central nervous system disorder

Fibromyalgia now considered as a lifelong central nervous system disorder

Fibromyalgia is the second most common rheumatic disorder behind osteoarthritis and, though still widely misunderstood, is now considered to be a lifelong central nervous system disorder, which is responsible for amplified pain that shoots through the body in those who suffer from it. [More]
UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

For the better part of the last decade, a growing body of research has been revealing more and more similarities between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. [More]

Not all psychopaths fit the 'cold, callous and untreatable' stereotype, shows study

Movie villains from Norman Bates to Hannibal Lecter have popularized the notion of the psychopath as cold, cruel, lacking in empathy and beyond the reach of treatment. [More]

Researchers evaluate effects of integrating religious beliefs into depression therapy

For chronically ill patients with major depression, an approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) that incorporates patients' religious beliefs is at least as effective as conventional CBT, suggests a study in the April issue of The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. [More]
Study finding suggests importance of individually-tailored treatment for depression

Study finding suggests importance of individually-tailored treatment for depression

The most commonly used treatment for the over 14 million Americans who suffer from Major Depressive Disorder is anti-depressant medication. While such medications bring relief to many, current research suggests that one size may not fit all when it comes to treating depression. [More]
Stepped-care strategy improves function, decreases pain severity in veterans

Stepped-care strategy improves function, decreases pain severity in veterans

Although U.S. military veterans who have returned from Iraq or Afghanistan are more likely to suffer chronic pain than veterans of any other conflict in American history, little headway has been made in helping them manage the often debilitating effects of chronic pain. [More]
Successful cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety provides long-term benefits

Successful cognitive behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety provides long-term benefits

Penn Medicine researchers found that patients who did not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in childhood had more chronic and enduring patterns of suicidal ideation at 7 to 19 years after treatment. [More]
UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

UTHealth study focuses on new cognitive behavioral therapy to treat PTSD, substance use disorders

A new cognitive behavioral therapy designed to treat both post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders is the focus of research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors today approved awards totaling more than $64 million to fund five large patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) studies that will answer critical clinical questions about care for cancer, back pain, and stroke. [More]
Rogers Behavioral Health announces addition of eating disorder program to Tampa location

Rogers Behavioral Health announces addition of eating disorder program to Tampa location

Rogers Behavioral Health-Tampa Bay announced today that it is adding a partial hospitalization eating disorder program to its Tampa location beginning March 30. This news is particularly timely as the nation recognizes National Eating Disorder Awareness Week February 22-28. [More]
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor explores causes, treatments of anorexia

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor explores causes, treatments of anorexia

Eating disorders are serious, debilitating conditions associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and distress. Anorexia nervosa, in particular, is associated with the highest mortality and suicide rates; compared to healthy peers, women with anorexia are up to 12 times more likely to die of any cause, and approximately 57 times more likely to die from suicide, over the same period of time. [More]
Organizational culture may increase use of evidence-based treatments for adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Organizational culture may increase use of evidence-based treatments for adolescents with psychiatric disorders

Many mental health therapists use treatments that have little evidence to support them. A new multi-institution study led by Penn Medicine has found that an organization's culture and climate are better predictors of the use of evidence-based practices than an individual therapist's characteristics in the treatment of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. [More]
Short-term cognitive behavioral therapy reduces suicide attempts among at-risk soldiers

Short-term cognitive behavioral therapy reduces suicide attempts among at-risk soldiers

Short-term cognitive behavioral therapy dramatically reduces suicide attempts among at-risk military personnel, according to findings from a research study that included investigators from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. [More]
Tips to help manage migraine in children

Tips to help manage migraine in children

Although we may think of migraine as a disease of adults, it can also affect children of all ages. Some studies show migraine affects 6% of children and up to 28% of adolescents ages 15-17. To assist parents whose children suffer from migraine, and to help the children themselves, the American Migraine Foundation and its Chair, David W. Dodick, MD, FRCP (C) are offering a number of tips to help manage childhood migraine and minimize its impact. [More]
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