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Cognition is a concept used in different ways by different disciplines, but is generally accepted to mean the process of thought. For example, in psychology and cognitive science it refers to an information processing view of an individual's psychological functions.
Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring's brains starting before pregnancy. [More]
New survey sheds light on the way Americans think about their brain health, lifestyle habits

New survey sheds light on the way Americans think about their brain health, lifestyle habits

Is your brain important to you? Do you know how to keep it healthy? According to a recent survey conducted by Reader’s Digest in partnership with the Alzheimer’s Association, 91 percent of people believe they can reduce their risk of cognitive decline, but they have misconceptions about ways to keep their brains healthy. [More]
Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two of the nation's leading physician-scientists in the search to better understand and treat Alzheimer's disease - William Mobley, MD, PhD, and Michael Rafii, MD, PhD - have been named interim co-directors of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a major initiative formed in 1991 as a cooperative agreement between the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the University of California, San Diego. [More]
UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

University of California, Riverside psychologist Chandra A. Reynolds has been awarded a $7 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study how early childhood influences versus recent influences affect cognitive and physical health by middle age. [More]
Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed. The research is published in the June 24, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Unique program enhances sense of purpose and meaning in life for seniors living independently

Unique program enhances sense of purpose and meaning in life for seniors living independently

A unique program combining a life review writing workshop with conversations between seniors and college students enhances the sense of meaning in life for older adults living independently, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]
High-fat, high-sugar diet can cause bacterial changes that appear related to loss of 'cognitive flexibility'

High-fat, high-sugar diet can cause bacterial changes that appear related to loss of 'cognitive flexibility'

A study at Oregon State University indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations. [More]
Scientists explore diabetes-cognitive decline link across cultures

Scientists explore diabetes-cognitive decline link across cultures

Diabetes is a known risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, age-related conditions that affect memory and thinking skills. However, little is known about how the diabetes-cognitive decline link compares across cultures. [More]
Women with significant depressive symptoms have lower levels of klotho hormone

Women with significant depressive symptoms have lower levels of klotho hormone

Women under chronic stress have significantly lower levels of klotho, a hormone that regulates aging and enhances cognition, researchers at UC San Francisco have found in a study comparing mothers of children on the autism spectrum to low-stress controls. [More]
Research explores screening methods, clinical care for patients with Alzheimer's and all forms of dementia

Research explores screening methods, clinical care for patients with Alzheimer's and all forms of dementia

Every 67 seconds someone is the United States develops Alzheimer's disease or some form of dementia. It's the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and it's the only cause of death in the top 10 in America that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed. This month, as the nation observes "Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month," James E. Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., one of the most prominent neuroscientists in the country, is at the helm of cutting-edge research, screening methods and clinical care for all forms of dementia and cognitive impairments as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. [More]

Study examines link between environmental characteristics and apathy in nursing home residents with dementia

Nursing home residents with dementia are less likely to be apathetic if they live in an appropriately stimulating environment, according to nursing researchers. [More]
Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

While participating in physical activities such as bike riding, dancing, walking and gardening and mentally stimulating activities such as crosswords and reading may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, they may not do so by affecting the underlying markers for the disease, according to a study published in the June 10, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Key lifestyle changes could help reduce risk of cognitive decline

Key lifestyle changes could help reduce risk of cognitive decline

The evidence is mounting: People can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by making key lifestyle changes. That is the conclusion of a new research summary published online today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. [More]
WBRT associated with worse cognitive function than radiosurgery, shows study

WBRT associated with worse cognitive function than radiosurgery, shows study

Whole Brain Radiation Therapy (WBRT) is associated with significantly worse cognitive function than radiosurgery, and should no longer be used in the adjuvant setting after radiosurgery to treat cancer patients with brain metastases, according to a large study led by a researcher at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Scientists one step closer to understanding how brain regulates memory and mood

Scientists one step closer to understanding how brain regulates memory and mood

Scientists are one step closer to understanding how the brain regulates memory and mood, thanks to the discovery of two distinct types of stem cells. [More]
Iron may underlie effect of Alzheimer’s risk allele

Iron may underlie effect of Alzheimer’s risk allele

Ferritin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the APOE ε4 risk allele and predicts cognitive outcomes, a study shows. [More]
People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment (CI) have altered responses to pain, with many conditions associated with increased pain sensitivity, concludes a research review in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]
Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide is known by many as a poisonous gas that causes brain injury and other neurological symptoms, including memory loss and confusion. But a new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests the opposite may be true: When administered in small, carefully controlled amounts, carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a devastating stroke that results from bleeding in the brain. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility. [More]
Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Studies have shown that both air pollution and impaired lung function can cause cognitive deficits, but it was unclear whether air pollution diminishes cognition by reducing breathing ability first or whether air pollution represents an independent risk factor for cognitive deficit. [More]
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