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Cognition is a concept used in different ways by different disciplines, but is generally accepted to mean the process of thought. For example, in psychology and cognitive science it refers to an information processing view of an individual's psychological functions.
Benefits of early dementia diagnosis may lead to challenging issues, new study shows

Benefits of early dementia diagnosis may lead to challenging issues, new study shows

A new epidemiologic study showed that patients with early stage dementia, who had been referred to a specialist, have twice the risk of institutionalization compared to those who are not, according to a research study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease this month. [More]
New heart failure drug may increase patients' risk of Alzheimer's disease, macular degeneration

New heart failure drug may increase patients' risk of Alzheimer's disease, macular degeneration

Patients with mild heart failure stand to benefit from a new drug that can halt the progression of their disease and reduce their risk of cardiovascular-related death. But the drug -- a tablet that combines the agents valsartan and sacubitril, sold under the trade name Entresto by drugmaker Novartis -- may be too good to be true, according to Arthur M. Feldman, MD, PhD, Executive Dean of the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Chief Academic Officer of the Temple University Health System, and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Medicine at LKSOM. [More]
Two UK studies reveal apparent increase in healthy ageing, less severe disability

Two UK studies reveal apparent increase in healthy ageing, less severe disability

Two studies conducted 20 years apart in England reveal an apparent increase in healthy ageing, or years lived healthily, reflecting less cognitive impairment; and an increase in the proportion of life lived healthily, through a larger proportion of years lived with disability but less rather than more severe disability. [More]
Tetra begins human Phase 1 safety trials of BPN14770

Tetra begins human Phase 1 safety trials of BPN14770

Tetra Discovery Partners today announced that the company has initiated human Phase 1 safety trials of its lead compound BPN14770, which Tetra is developing as a potential treatment to both improve memory and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Patients suffering from diabetic foot have significantly impaired cognitive function

Patients suffering from diabetic foot have significantly impaired cognitive function

In a first-time study, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers revealed a new finding in people with diabetes who suffer from "diabetic foot." Patients with this condition also have significantly impaired cognitive function. [More]
Taking estriol along with conventional medications helps RRMS patients avoid relapses

Taking estriol along with conventional medications helps RRMS patients avoid relapses

Taking the pregnancy hormone estriol along with their conventional medications helped patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) avoid relapses, according to results of a Phase II randomized, placebo-controlled study led by UCLA researchers. [More]
Low levels of BRCA1 protein in the brain linked to dementia

Low levels of BRCA1 protein in the brain linked to dementia

Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer's disease. The results, published in Nature Communications, suggest that low levels of BRCA1 protein in the brain may contribute to dementia. [More]
Air evacuations may pose significant added risk to patients with traumatic brain injury

Air evacuations may pose significant added risk to patients with traumatic brain injury

Over the past 15 years, more than 330,000 U.S. soldiers have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is one of the leading causes of death and disability connected to the country's recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Many of these patients were evacuated by air from these countries to Europe and the U.S. for further treatment. In general, these patients were flown quickly to hospitals outside the battle zone, where more extensive treatment was available. [More]
Lack of direct parental care affects brain development in left-behind children

Lack of direct parental care affects brain development in left-behind children

Researchers in China have found that children who have been left without direct parental care for extended periods of time show larger gray matter volumes in the brain, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Physical exercise can enhance development of new brain cells

Physical exercise can enhance development of new brain cells

Exercise can enhance the development of new brain cells in the adult brain, a process called adult neurogenesis. These newborn brain cells play an important role in learning and memory. A new study has determined that mice that spent time running on wheels not only developed twice the normal number of new neurons, but also showed an increased ability to distinguish new objects from familiar objects. [More]
Brain protein identifies presence of nerve fiber damage

Brain protein identifies presence of nerve fiber damage

Physicians and others now recognize that seemingly mild, concussion-type head injuries lead to long-term cognitive impairments surprisingly often. A brain protein called SNTF, which rises in the blood after some concussions, signals the type of brain damage that is thought to be the source of these cognitive impairments, according to a study led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. [More]
Exercise can impact cortical thickness in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Exercise can impact cortical thickness in older adults with mild cognitive impairment

Older adults that improved their fitness through a moderate intensity exercise program increased the thickness of their brain's cortex, the outer layer of the brain that typically atrophies with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Maryland School of Public Health. [More]

Researchers develop simple visual test to identify individuals' level of executive cognitive abilities

University of Georgia researchers have developed a simple technique to measure an individual's visual processing speed--the speed at which an individual can comprehend visual information--in order to identify whether or not they may have cognitive issues. [More]
NIH-led collaboration details research strategy to address brain disorders

NIH-led collaboration details research strategy to address brain disorders

Infants are starved of oxygen during difficult births. Children's cognitive function is permanently damaged due to malnutrition or exposure to infections or toxins. Adults suffer from crippling depression or dementia. The breadth and complexity of these and other brain and nervous system disorders make them some of the most difficult conditions to diagnose and treat, especially in the developing world, where there are few resources. [More]
Scientists explain the evolutionary roots of language in the brain

Scientists explain the evolutionary roots of language in the brain

A team led at Newcastle University, UK, has shed light on the evolutionary roots of language in the brain. Publishing in Nature Communications, the team led by Dr Ben Wilson and Professor Chris Petkov explain how using an imaging technique to explore the brain activity in humans and monkeys has identified the evolutionary origins of cognitive functions in the brain that underpin language and allow us to evaluate orderliness in sequences of sounds. [More]
Landmark study demonstrates link between pupils' breakfast quality and educational attainment

Landmark study demonstrates link between pupils' breakfast quality and educational attainment

A direct and positive link between pupils' breakfast quality and consumption, and their educational attainment, has for the first time been demonstrated in a ground-breaking new study carried out by public health experts at Cardiff University. [More]
Reproductive history associated with cognitive impairment risk in postmenopausal women

Reproductive history associated with cognitive impairment risk in postmenopausal women

Researchers led by Professor Jun-Fen Lin at Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention have found that reproductive history, an important modifier of estrogen exposure across women's lifetime, is associated with risk of cognitive impairment in postmenopausal women. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Linking digital activity trackers to smartphones and periodically pinging users with personalized texts that urge them to walk more can significantly increase physical activity levels and spark healthy behavior changes, according to findings of a pilot study conducted at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Study finds high prevalence of dehydration in older people living in UK care homes

Study finds high prevalence of dehydration in older people living in UK care homes

One in every five older people living in UK care homes has dehydration, suggesting that they are not drinking enough to keep themselves healthy. [More]
Intensive management of high blood pressure reduces rates of cardiovascular disease, lowers risk of death

Intensive management of high blood pressure reduces rates of cardiovascular disease, lowers risk of death

Jackson T. Wright Jr., MD, PhD, and researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center presented new results from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) showing that in patients at high risk for cardiovascular events, targeting a systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mm Hg resulted in lower rates of fatal and non-fatal major events or death compared to targeting systolic blood pressure to the usually recommended target of less than 140 mm Hg. [More]
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