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Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos. [More]

BioHorizons launches MinerOss X for dental implant site development procedures

BioHorizons, an oral reconstructive device company, today announced the launch of MinerOss X, a family of xenograft products for dental implant site development procedures. The MinerOss X family includes cancellous or cortical particulate, a moldable collagen block, and a cancellous particulate pre-loaded into a delivery syringe to assist with optimal placement. [More]
Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

A total 12 million Germans suffer from periodontitis. If the inflammation remains untreated, this could lead to tooth loss. However, it is also suspected of triggering many other diseases, like cardiopulmonary diseases. Researchers are studying the interactions, and developing compounds to combat the causative agents. [More]
Survey finds that 49% of post-menopausal women do not take bone health supplements

Survey finds that 49% of post-menopausal women do not take bone health supplements

Make no bones about it; post-menopausal women are well aware of the risks of brittle bones and fractures; however, a national survey of women taken for AIDP, Inc., the supplier of KoACT, a patented combination of collagen and calcium, found that almost half (49%) are not taking any bone health supplement to address this major health issue. [More]
Study provides better glimpse at the biology of height

Study provides better glimpse at the biology of height

The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date, involving more than 300 institutions and more than 250,000 subjects, roughly doubles the number of known gene regions influencing height to more than 400. [More]
Researchers receive $4 million NIH grant to bioengineer miniature pancreas in a dish

Researchers receive $4 million NIH grant to bioengineer miniature pancreas in a dish

Although type 1 diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections and lifestyle modifications, major advances in treating the disease have not been made in more than two decades and there remain fundamental gaps in what is understood about its causes and how to halt its progression. [More]
U-M researchers describe new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments

U-M researchers describe new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments

Researchers at the University of Michigan have described a new approach to discovering potential cancer treatments that requires a fraction of the time needed for more traditional methods. [More]
Major weight loss: A risk factor for wound complications in body contouring surgery

Major weight loss: A risk factor for wound complications in body contouring surgery

Patients who lost more than 100 pounds and those who shed weight through bariatric surgery had the highest risk of complications from later surgical procedures to reshape their leaner bodies, a new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows. [More]
Studies explain why some people are at greater risk for ACL injury than others

Studies explain why some people are at greater risk for ACL injury than others

The successful rise and fall of an athlete's moving body relies on an orchestrated response of bones, joints, ligaments and tendons, putting the many angles and intersecting planes - literally the geometry - of a critical part like a knee joint to the test. But it's more than just a footfall error at the root of one of the most devastating of sports injuries: the ACL or anterior cruciate ligament tear. [More]
Researchers develop T-MOC device to study complex environment surrounding tumors

Researchers develop T-MOC device to study complex environment surrounding tumors

Researchers have developed a chip capable of simulating a tumor's "microenvironment" and plan to use the new system to test the effectiveness of nanoparticles and drugs that target cancer. [More]
Research sheds light on how collagen grows and helps form diverse set of structures in body

Research sheds light on how collagen grows and helps form diverse set of structures in body

Research by a biomedical engineer at Texas A&M University is shedding light on how collagen grows at the molecular level and helps form a diverse set of structures in the body, ranging from bone, tendon, blood vessels, skin, heart and even corneas. [More]
Ornamental birds and exposure to pigeons may contribute to hypersensitive pneumonitis

Ornamental birds and exposure to pigeons may contribute to hypersensitive pneumonitis

Ornamental birds and feather pillows, plus daily exposure to pigeons may contribute to the development hypersensitive pneumonitis, a disease that can cause irreversible damage to the lungs. [More]
Non-invasive delivery of drugs for effective pain relief

Non-invasive delivery of drugs for effective pain relief

Individuals who are squeamish about injections or are looking for a way to let collagen penetrate deeper into the skin may soon have a solution that is faster, more effective and painless. [More]
Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

A team of researchers from Korea and Canada have found that transplantation of B10 cells (a stable immortalized human bone marrow derived -mesenchymal stem cell line; B10 hMSC) directly into the bladder wall of mice modeled with spinal cord injury (SCI) helped inhibit the development of bladder fibrosis and improved bladder function by promoting the growth of smooth muscle cells in the bladder. [More]

Raloxifene: FDA approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis

Raloxifene is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. [More]
Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Cigarette smoking kills approximately 440,000 Americans each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection. It's the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. In order to overcome this addiction, many people resort to nicotine replacement therapies. [More]
Gene variants linked to overactive bladder and prolapse in women

Gene variants linked to overactive bladder and prolapse in women

A systematic review and meta-analysis of genetic association studies reveals a number of genetic variations associated with overactive bladder and pelvic organ prolapse in women. [More]
Auxilium Pharmaceuticals' CCH drug effective against cellulite in Phase 2a study

Auxilium Pharmaceuticals' CCH drug effective against cellulite in Phase 2a study

Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced positive results from a randomized, double-blind Phase 2a study of collagenase clostridium histolyticum (or CCH) for the treatment of edematous fibrosclerotic panniculopathy (EFP), commonly known as cellulite. [More]
Thermo sensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture enhances tissue-engineered peripheral nerve

Thermo sensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture enhances tissue-engineered peripheral nerve

Tissue engineering technologies offer new treatment strategies for the repair of peripheral nerve injury, but cell loss between seeding and adhesion to the scaffold remains inevitable. [More]
Enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type-1

Enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type-1

An enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type-1, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. [More]