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U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

U-M researchers devise reliable way to grow tumor cells

In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study. [More]

EC grants orphan drug designation to TxCell's Col-Treg for treatment of autoimmune uveitis

TxCell SA, a biotechnology company developing innovative, cost-effective, personalized T cell immunotherapies using antigen specific regulatory T-cells (Ag-Tregs) for severe chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, announces today that the European Commission (EC) has granted orphan drug designation to TxCell's investigational medicinal product Col-Treg, a personalized T cell immunotherapy using collagen-II specific regulatory T-cells, for the treatment of autoimmune uveitis. [More]
Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

In a study published today by Nature, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center used a microscopic worm (C. elegans) to identify a new path that could lead to drugs to slow aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it--and might even lead to better cosmetics. [More]
ADIPOQ gene variations linked to colorectal cancer risk, new study reveals

ADIPOQ gene variations linked to colorectal cancer risk, new study reveals

Adiponectin, a collagen-like protein secreted by fat cells, derives from the ADIPOQ gene. Variations in this gene may increase risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and various cancers. A new study that links specific variations in the ADIPOQ gene to either higher or lower colorectal cancer risk is published in Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

New therapeutic targets can prevent scarring within transplanted kidneys

Kidneys donated by people born with a small variation in the code of a key gene may be more likely, once in the transplant recipient, to accumulate scar tissue that contributes to kidney failure, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport Syndrome was first described by a physician called Cecil Alport, back in the late 1920s. It's a genetic disease that affects a certain type of collagen involved in the functioning of the kidney, the ear, and the eye. [More]
Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Promising new therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects at least one in four Americans who are older than 60 and can significantly shorten lifespan. Yet the few available drugs for CKD can only modestly delay the disease's progress towards kidney failure. Now, however, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has found an aspect of CKD's development that points to a promising new therapeutic strategy. [More]
Researchers make significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone disease

Researchers make significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone disease

Researchers in bone tissue regeneration believe they have made a significant breakthrough for sufferers of bone trauma, disease or defects such as osteoporosis. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Scientists use TPF-SHG microscopy to study effects of micro-ablative fractional laser resurfacing

Scientists use TPF-SHG microscopy to study effects of micro-ablative fractional laser resurfacing

Many people in the Western World consider it as a social need to hide the effects of aging. For this purpose, different cutaneous rejuvenation treatments have been developed, including a laser-based technique, known as laser resurfacing. [More]
New, non-surgical approach to improve sagging skin in the chin and neck region

New, non-surgical approach to improve sagging skin in the chin and neck region

Patients looking for a non-surgical approach to treat unwanted sagging skin in the chin and neck region have a new and effective option. Bowes Dermatology is proud to offer patients the revolutionary Velashape III to address this common concern. [More]
AlloSource recognized with CBSA's Company of the Year award

AlloSource recognized with CBSA's Company of the Year award

AlloSource, one of the nation's largest providers of skin, bone and soft tissue allografts for use in surgical procedures, and the world's largest processor of cellular bone allografts, has been named the Company of the Year by the Colorado BioScience Association. AlloSource is a repeat winner, having won this award in 2007. [More]
Dietary supplement KoACT is superior to calcium, vitamin D for bone health, study reveals

Dietary supplement KoACT is superior to calcium, vitamin D for bone health, study reveals

A new study by a Florida State University researcher reveals that a new dietary supplement is superior to calcium and vitamin D when it comes to bone health. [More]
Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. By shedding light on precisely how tumor cells travel, the device could uncover new ways to keep cancer in check. [More]
Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues may provide new treatments for injuries, damage to the joints

Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. [More]
TxCell demonstrates therapeutic potential of Col-Treg for treatment of autoimmune uveitis

TxCell demonstrates therapeutic potential of Col-Treg for treatment of autoimmune uveitis

TxCell SA, a biotechnology company developing innovative, economically viable, personalized T cell immunotherapies using antigen specific regulatory T-cells (Ag-Tregs) for severe chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, announces today that TxCell researchers have achieved positive results for Col-Treg, its second product candidate from its ASTrIA platform, in a model of autoimmune uveitis, a leading cause of blindness with very limited treatment options. [More]
New material advances tissue engineering, drug delivery

New material advances tissue engineering, drug delivery

Researchers at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale—a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers. [More]
Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Anthropological study sheds light on the eating habits of Roman gladiators

Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos. [More]

BioHorizons launches MinerOss X for dental implant site development procedures

BioHorizons, an oral reconstructive device company, today announced the launch of MinerOss X, a family of xenograft products for dental implant site development procedures. The MinerOss X family includes cancellous or cortical particulate, a moldable collagen block, and a cancellous particulate pre-loaded into a delivery syringe to assist with optimal placement. [More]
Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

Researchers are developing compounds to combat causative agents of periodontitis

A total 12 million Germans suffer from periodontitis. If the inflammation remains untreated, this could lead to tooth loss. However, it is also suspected of triggering many other diseases, like cardiopulmonary diseases. Researchers are studying the interactions, and developing compounds to combat the causative agents. [More]