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New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

With the Rio Olympics just weeks away, many are wondering how Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt will perform. [More]
Scientists discover new, unexpected features of collagen

Scientists discover new, unexpected features of collagen

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health are reporting new, unexpected details about the fundamental structure of collagen, the most abundant protein in the human body. [More]
New topical film patch can effectively close dermal wounds, reduce scarring

New topical film patch can effectively close dermal wounds, reduce scarring

Currently there is no product available based on polymer film containing active molecules to accelerate dermal wound healing that also reduces the scar formation. [More]
Computational modelling method can predict development and progression of osteoarthritis

Computational modelling method can predict development and progression of osteoarthritis

Computational modelling makes it possible to predict the onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis in overweight people, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
Researchers use gelation chips to develop strong muscle fibers

Researchers use gelation chips to develop strong muscle fibers

USC researcher Megan L. McCain and colleagues have devised a way to develop bigger, stronger muscle fibers. But instead of popping up on the bicep of a bodybuilder, these muscles grow on a tiny scaffold or "chip" molded from a type of water-logged gel made from gelatin. [More]
New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technologies that facilitate a look inside the human body using light -- and without cutting into the tissue -- promise to enable both compact, wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics as well as powerful new systems that provide even more information and from even deeper under the skin. [More]
Age no barrier to vorapaxar use in ACS

Age no barrier to vorapaxar use in ACS

The protease-activated receptor 1 inhibitor vorapaxar offers the same benefits to older and younger patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, shows further analysis of the TRACER trial. [More]
Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment

Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment

The first consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies is set to be published simultaneously in EP-Europace, HeartRhythm, and the Journal of Arrhythmia. The key contents are launched today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016. [More]
Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

Study opens up possibility of developing potential hormone therapies for SSc skin disease

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time a beneficial effect of oestrogens in experimental models of skin fibrosis that are representative of the disease process in systemic sclerosis (SSc). [More]
BNPs have potential to enable early diagnosis, long-term treatment of RA with minimal side effects

BNPs have potential to enable early diagnosis, long-term treatment of RA with minimal side effects

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that tiny particles made of a biodegradable polymer (BNPs -- biodegradable polymer nanoparticles) have the potential to enable early detection and efficient long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with minimal side effects. [More]
Unlocking the first gene to cause otosclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Holme

Unlocking the first gene to cause otosclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Holme

Otosclerosis is a common cause of hearing loss, particularly amongst young adults. It normally starts in their 20s or 30s and it affects about 1 in 200 hundred people. In the UK, about 300,000 people are affected by the condition. [More]
Researchers aim to find new approach to improve chronic wound repair

Researchers aim to find new approach to improve chronic wound repair

Chronic wounds cause nearly 80,000 lower leg amputations annually in the U.S. alone and are associated with an increased likelihood of death. [More]
New urine-based diagnostic method may help detect preeclampsia in pregnant women

New urine-based diagnostic method may help detect preeclampsia in pregnant women

A team of scientists from the Federal State Budget Institution "Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology", Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Emanuel Institute for Biochemical Physics, and the Talrose Institute for Energy Problems of Chemical Physics have developed an approach for a method of non-invasive testing for pregnant women with a serious and complex condition called preeclampsia. [More]
Aquatic resistance training improves tibiofemoral cartilage quality in postmenopausal women with knee pain

Aquatic resistance training improves tibiofemoral cartilage quality in postmenopausal women with knee pain

Postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis, who may avoid strenuous exercise due to pain, can safely promote cartilage health and improve aerobic fitness with intensive aquatic resistance training. [More]
Chloride switch controls critical step in basement membrane formation

Chloride switch controls critical step in basement membrane formation

Chloride plays a key role in the formation of the basement membrane, a suprastructure on the outside of cells that undergirds and guides the function of most of the tissues of the body. [More]
Nanoparticle-based gene therapy may hold promise for patients with asthma

Nanoparticle-based gene therapy may hold promise for patients with asthma

A new study has demonstrated a way to deliver a nanoparticle-based gene therapy, in order to repair lungs damaged by chronic allergic asthma and to reduce inflammation that causes asthma attacks. [More]
University of Colorado Boulder combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation

University of Colorado Boulder combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation. [More]
Scientists discover reliable marker to spot CAFs in oral cancer tissues

Scientists discover reliable marker to spot CAFs in oral cancer tissues

For the first time, researchers have identified a reliable marker (PDGFRβ) to detect carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (cells within the tumor that encourage growth and metastasis) (CAFs) in oral cancer tissues. With this discovery, anti-PDGFRβ treatment could soon be combined with existing tumor treatments to provide a more effective cancer therapy. [More]
New light-based technique may offer improved treatment for eye problems

New light-based technique may offer improved treatment for eye problems

Researchers have developed a new light-based technique that selectively stiffens tissue in the cornea and might one day offer improved treatment for eye problems caused by weakened corneal tissue. [More]
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