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Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Surgeon to perform live-streamed Virtual Reality surgery on colon cancer patient using Mativision technology

Surgeon to perform live-streamed Virtual Reality surgery on colon cancer patient using Mativision technology

An operation on a patient with colon cancer at The Royal London Hospital will be the first in the world to be broadcast live through pioneering virtual reality (VR) technology. [More]
Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that higher levels of vitamin D - specifically serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D - are associated with a correspondingly reduced risk of cancer. The findings are published in the April 6, online issue of PLOS ONE. [More]
New CWRU study identifies three glycosyltransferases as major mutational targets in colorectal cancer

New CWRU study identifies three glycosyltransferases as major mutational targets in colorectal cancer

Little is known about the molecular basis of aberrant protein glycosylation, a complex enzymatic process that is a hallmark of many human cancers including colorectal cancers (CRC), and how it may contribute to tumor progression. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, an online journal of the Nature Publishing Group, scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have successfully characterized the mutational landscapes of glycosylation-associated genes in colon cancer, identifying three glycosyltransferases as significant mutational targets in CRC. [More]
USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

Whether you like your coffee black, decaf, half-caff or even instant, feel free to drink up. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center of Keck Medicine of USC have found that coffee consumption decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
Researchers develop metastasis-on-a-chip system to advance cancer investigation, drug discovery

Researchers develop metastasis-on-a-chip system to advance cancer investigation, drug discovery

Advances in personalized medicine allow doctors to select the most promising drugs for certain types of malignant tumors. [More]
Prognostic test could help lower cancer recurrence for colorectal patients

Prognostic test could help lower cancer recurrence for colorectal patients

Colorectal cancer, one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States, is not a commonly discussed disease. Often symptomless in early stages, the cancer is more difficult to treat as it progresses, requiring chemotherapy in later stages. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are working on a way to identify patients who would benefit from chemotherapy before the cancer progresses. [More]
Researchers uncover antitumoral nature of maslinic acid in colon cancer cells

Researchers uncover antitumoral nature of maslinic acid in colon cancer cells

Researchers from the University of Granada, in collaboration with the universities of Barcelona and Jaen, have brought to light the antitumoral nature of maslinic acid (a compound derived from olives) in Caco-2 p53-deficient colon adenocarcinoma cells in the short term. [More]
NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have discovered that a deficiency in a key protein that regulates immune system warning signals could be a new biomarker for colorectal cancer, the second largest cancer killer in the United States. They believe the marker could be used to gauge response to a potential new treatment for the disease. [More]
High-fat diet may make intestinal stem cells to become cancerous

High-fat diet may make intestinal stem cells to become cancerous

Over the past decade, studies have found that obesity and eating a high-fat, high-calorie diet are significant risk factors for many types of cancer. Now, a new study from Whitehead Institute and MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research reveals how a high-fat diet makes the cells of the intestinal lining more likely to become cancerous. [More]
Researchers aim to develop gentler treatment that 'tricks' cancer cells

Researchers aim to develop gentler treatment that 'tricks' cancer cells

The most common treatments for cancer are radiation and chemotherapy. However they have side effects and also damage healthy tissues. Moreover, their effectiveness is limited when the cancer has spread through out the body. Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute are therefore working to develop a gentler treatment that 'tricks' the cancer cells, which would absorb a cytotoxin and therefore be destroyed, while healthy cells would remain unaffected. The results are published in the scientific journal, Scientific Reports. [More]
Researchers show how increases in state and local social spending can reduce risk of dying

Researchers show how increases in state and local social spending can reduce risk of dying

Income inequality and government social spending. These are hot-??button issues in this year's presidential primaries: the rich getting richer, the poor getting poorer, and the government's role in closing the gap--or not. [More]
Researchers find way to boost the body's natural cancer-killing cells

Researchers find way to boost the body's natural cancer-killing cells

The immune cells, called natural killer cells, hunt and destroy foreign cells in the body, including cancer cells that spread and form tumours. [More]
Researchers develop new method to screen tumor samples for presence of human polyomaviruses

Researchers develop new method to screen tumor samples for presence of human polyomaviruses

Human polyomaviruses are commonly found in the population and generally do not produce noticeable symptoms. However, one type of human polyomavirus, the Merkel cell polyomavirus, is known to cause a rare form of skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma, and other members of the polyomavirus family can induce non-cancer related diseases in people with compromised immune systems. [More]
Study shows high cost, high side effects and little gain for chemotherapy in older mCRC patients

Study shows high cost, high side effects and little gain for chemotherapy in older mCRC patients

A study published online ahead of print in the journal Medical Care shows that over a recent 10-year period, the rate of metastatic colorectal cancer patients older than age 75 receiving three or more treatments increased from 2 percent to 53 percent. [More]
Pancreatic cancer identified as four separate diseases with different genetic triggers, survival rates

Pancreatic cancer identified as four separate diseases with different genetic triggers, survival rates

An international team led by Australian researchers has studied the genetics of pancreatic cancer, revealing it is actually four separate diseases, each with different genetic triggers and survival rates, paving the way for more accurate diagnoses and treatments. [More]
Post-operative colonoscopy can improve overall survival in colorectal cancer patients

Post-operative colonoscopy can improve overall survival in colorectal cancer patients

It is critically important that colorectal cancer patients undergo colonoscopy after surgery to ensure that they do not have a second colon cancer, and to find and remove any additional polyps. [More]
EndoChoice Holdings releases Lumos Adaptive Matrix Imaging system

EndoChoice Holdings releases Lumos Adaptive Matrix Imaging system

EndoChoice Holdings, Inc. announced the release of Lumos, a novel and proprietary imaging software system as part of the Fuse Full Spectrum Endoscopy platform. Scientists and engineers at EndoChoice created Lumos based upon Adaptive Matrix Imaging which analyzes and selectively enhances the vascularity, surface texture, and color of abnormal tissue, providing better clarity for physicians. [More]
Structural movie reveals step-by-step creation of chemical that plays important role in some cancers

Structural movie reveals step-by-step creation of chemical that plays important role in some cancers

An international team of scientists led by the University of Liverpool has produced a 'structural movie' revealing the step-by-step creation of an important naturally occurring chemical in the body that plays a role in some cancers. [More]
Duke scientists reveal how gut inflammation increases colon cancer risk

Duke scientists reveal how gut inflammation increases colon cancer risk

Chronic inflammation in the gut increases the risk of colon cancer by as much as 500 percent, and now Duke University researchers think they know why. [More]
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