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Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

UCLA scientists have discovered a groundbreaking experimental therapy that has the ability to suppress the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), a disease which causes inflammation in the digestive tract and colon cancer. The treatment utilizes a chemical inhibitor able to block an RNA molecule (microRNA-214) involved in the transmission of genetic information. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Recent advances in the understanding of cancer have led to more personalized therapies, such as drugs that target particular proteins and tests that analyze gene expression patterns in tumors to predict a patient's response to therapy. [More]
ICER’s drug assessment program to provide trusted source of information about new drugs

ICER’s drug assessment program to provide trusted source of information about new drugs

With drug prices for cancer and many other conditions soaring to new highs amid questions about their true value to patients, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review today launched a program to transform the way new drugs are evaluated and priced in the United States. [More]
Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Patients whose colorectal cancer (CRC) is detected during a screening colonoscopy are likely to survive longer than those who wait until they have symptoms before having the test, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]
Huntsman Cancer Institute receives NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Center designation

Huntsman Cancer Institute receives NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Center designation

The National Cancer Institute has awarded Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah its Comprehensive Cancer Center status, the highest designation possible. [More]
Researchers identify link between hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk among women with Lynch syndrome

Researchers identify link between hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk among women with Lynch syndrome

For women with Lynch syndrome, an association was found between the risk of endometrial cancer and the age of first menstrual cycle, having given birth, and hormonal contraceptive use, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA. Lynch syndrome is a genetic condition that increases the risk for various cancers. [More]
Low BMI linked to poorer survival in advanced colorectal cancer

Low BMI linked to poorer survival in advanced colorectal cancer

Although being overweight with a high body-mass index (BMI) has long been associated with a higher risk for colorectal cancer, thinner patients might not fare as well after treatment for advanced cancer, according to a new study from Duke Medicine. [More]
IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

Scientists from the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica [Institute of Biomedical Research], in Galicia (Spain), have made progress in the identification of new biomarkers for improving prevention of colorectal cancer. [More]
Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Recent Weizmann Institute studies are revealing a complex picture of cancer progression in which certain genes that drive tumor growth in the earlier stages get suppressed in later stages - taking a step back to move forward. [More]
UVA Health System opens high-tech clinical genomics lab

UVA Health System opens high-tech clinical genomics lab

The University of Virginia Health System has opened a high-tech clinical genomics lab that will personalize care for patients, help doctors determine the best treatments for cancers and other diseases, and allow UVA to offer the most cutting-edge clinical trials. [More]
UCSD researchers discover cell signaling pathway that controls initiation, progression of colorectal cancer

UCSD researchers discover cell signaling pathway that controls initiation, progression of colorectal cancer

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a cell signaling pathway that appears to exert some control over initiation and progression of colorectal cancer, the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. A key protein in the pathway also appears to be predictive of cancer survival rates. [More]
New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovery of just how a certain tumor suppressor molecule works to prevent tumor growth could lead to a personalized treatment approach for colon cancer. [More]
Researchers identify better way to screen for lung cancer

Researchers identify better way to screen for lung cancer

The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, is pleased to announce that two of its oncologists and a research scientist are helping pave the way to an easier, more accurate, less invasive way to screen for the most common form of lung cancer. Lung cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide and the number one cancer killer in the United States. [More]
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
Myriad Genetics, Chris4Life launch educational campaign to teach individuals about risk of hereditary cancer

Myriad Genetics, Chris4Life launch educational campaign to teach individuals about risk of hereditary cancer

Chris4Life Colon Cancer Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based national non-profit organization, and Myriad Genetics, a leader in personalized medicine, today announced their “What’s Your History” family history week (June 24-30, 2015). [More]
Selective use of biomarker testing for breast cancer patients can save millions of dollars in health care spending

Selective use of biomarker testing for breast cancer patients can save millions of dollars in health care spending

A review of medical records for almost 200 patients with breast cancer suggests that more selective use of biomarker testing for such patients has the potential to save millions of dollars in health care spending without compromising care, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
Study shows 28% decline in prostate cancer diagnoses following USPSTF recommendation against PSA testing

Study shows 28% decline in prostate cancer diagnoses following USPSTF recommendation against PSA testing

A new study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators found new diagnoses of prostate cancer in the U.S. declined 28 percent in the year following the draft recommendation from the United States Preventive Services Task Force against routine PSA screening for men. [More]
Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Men with an elevated, genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer could be routinely identified with a simple blood or urine test, scientists at UC San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente Northern California have concluded, potentially paving the way to better or earlier diagnosis. [More]
Lawson researchers find radiation-resistant stem cell population in the colon linked to cancer growth

Lawson researchers find radiation-resistant stem cell population in the colon linked to cancer growth

Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute have identified a new stem cell population in the colon linked to cancer growth. The findings, which were recently published in the prominent journal Cell Stem Cell, will significantly change the way we study and treat colon cancer. [More]
Percentage of female authorship in gastroenterology journals remains lower than expected

Percentage of female authorship in gastroenterology journals remains lower than expected

The percentage of U.S. female physician authors of original research in major gastroenterology journals has grown over time, yet the percentage of women in the senior author position remains lower than expected based on the proportion of female gastroenterologists in academia. [More]
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