Colorectal Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colorectal Cancer News and Research

Colorectal Cancer is cancer that develops in the colon (the longest part of the large intestine) and/or the rectum (the last several inches of the large intestine before the anus). In the United States, it is the fourth most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it is often curable.
Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

A new national survey by Health Union of more than 1,000 individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) reveals that the condition is difficult to diagnose and often even more difficult to treat. [More]
Researchers develop new computational method to track colorectal cancer progression

Researchers develop new computational method to track colorectal cancer progression

Team of researchers elaborated a computational method to track the progress of the colorectal cancer. It is a scientific advance that can bring new perspectives to discover the factors that push this pathology and the selection of efficient therapies. [More]
Scientists develop computational method to map cancer progression

Scientists develop computational method to map cancer progression

A team of scientists has developed a computational method to map cancer progression, an advance that offers new insights into the factors that spur this affliction as well as new ways of selecting effective therapies. [More]
Food's transit time through colon affects health of digestive system

Food's transit time through colon affects health of digestive system

The time it takes for ingested food to travel through the human gut - also called transit time - affects the amount of harmful degradation products produced along the way. [More]
Primary care visits lead to more screenings and follow-up colonoscopies

Primary care visits lead to more screenings and follow-up colonoscopies

People who visit their primary care physicians are more likely to get potentially life-saving colon cancer screenings and follow up on abnormal stool blood test results - even in health systems that heavily promote mail-in home stool blood tests that don't require a doctor visit, a study involving UT Southwestern population health researchers shows. [More]
Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

The Transforming Outcomes and Health Economics Through Imaging (TOHETI) programme is looking to change the way medical imaging works by undertaking a range of pioneering research. [More]
Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

"Behaviors such as poor diet choices, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and unhealthy body weight could account for more than 20 percent of cancer cases, and could, therefore, be prevented with lifestyle modifications," Kohler said, adding that when tobacco exposure is considered, these modifiable issues are believed to be factors in two-thirds of U.S. cancer deaths. [More]
Researchers determine whether older adults were up-to-date with CRC screening

Researchers determine whether older adults were up-to-date with CRC screening

Who should consider colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and why? CRC is a common and costly disease, largely of the elderly, with nearly 25% of cases diagnosed among patients aged 75-84 years, but the guidelines for CRC screening of Americans aged 75 or older vary according to the source. [More]
Scientists uncover five new genetic causes of bowel cancer

Scientists uncover five new genetic causes of bowel cancer

A landmark study has given the most detailed picture yet of the genetics of bowel cancer - the UK's fourth most common cancer. [More]
Patient navigators could help improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among low-income, ethnic minorities

Patient navigators could help improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among low-income, ethnic minorities

A clinical trial conducted by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that the use of patient navigators - individuals who assist patients in receiving health care services - may improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among patient populations not likely to receive recommended screenings. [More]
Scientists identify on/off obesity-induced switch to slow cancer progression

Scientists identify on/off obesity-induced switch to slow cancer progression

Having established that excessive fat tissue can fuel the growth of certain cancers, researchers have turned their attention to the molecular mechanisms involved in the process in the hopes of developing new cancer treatments. [More]
New research helps better understand role of TIP60 in allowing tumors to survive in low-oxygen environments

New research helps better understand role of TIP60 in allowing tumors to survive in low-oxygen environments

In summer 2011, University of Colorado Cancer Center investigators Joaquín Espinosa, PhD, and Matthew Galbraith, PhD, taught a summer symposium on gene expression at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Long Island, New York. [More]
Insurance coverage of CT colonography and other USPSTF-recognized tests could help fight CRC

Insurance coverage of CT colonography and other USPSTF-recognized tests could help fight CRC

Final United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) colorectal cancer screening recommendations assigned an "A" grade to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in those ages 50-75 years and provided a list of recognized screening exams. [More]
Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Eating three more portions of dietary fiber a day--say, two pieces of whole grain bread and a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal--is associated with a lower risk for all cardiovascular diseases and for dying of cancer, diabetes, and respiratory and infectious diseases, a study just published in the BMJ has shown. [More]
Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Many of the medicines we take were only ever tested on men during clinical studies. This poses a distinct danger that females are receiving suboptimal care—and that treatments specifically benefiting women are going undiscovered. [More]
Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models. [More]

Study: About 40% of Hispanic adults with colorectal cancer use CIH

A study of complementary and integrative health (CIH) use among Hispanic adults with colorectal cancer found that about 40% reported experience with CIH. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
New technology can detect KRAS gene mutations, facilitate targeted therapies for lung and colorectal cancers

New technology can detect KRAS gene mutations, facilitate targeted therapies for lung and colorectal cancers

A new technology suitable for practical clinical testing can detect KRAS gene mutations in lung and colorectal cancers and could thereby facilitate targeted therapies, according to a new report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. [More]
Study shows aggressive end-of-life care for young cancer patients may be less effective

Study shows aggressive end-of-life care for young cancer patients may be less effective

In the last month of their lives, younger cancer patients continued to be hospitalized and receive other aggressive treatment at high rates, a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led study found. [More]
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