Colorectal Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colorectal Cancer News and Research

Colorectal Cancer is cancer that develops in the colon (the longest part of the large intestine) and/or the rectum (the last several inches of the large intestine before the anus). In the United States, it is the fourth most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it is often curable.
Study sheds light on genetic differences between colorectal cancer in older and younger patients

Study sheds light on genetic differences between colorectal cancer in older and younger patients

While the overall rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) is declining, CRC specifically among young patients is increasing. Previous studies have shown that CRC in patients younger than 50 years old tends to be more aggressive than CRC in older patients. [More]
SurgiQuest receives FDA clearance for AirSeal System for Transanal Endoscopic Surgery

SurgiQuest receives FDA clearance for AirSeal System for Transanal Endoscopic Surgery

SurgiQuest, Inc., a leading provider of innovative access technologies for minimally invasive surgery (MIS), today announced that its AirSeal System recently received 510(k) Clearance from the FDA for Transanal Endoscopic Surgery (TES). [More]
Clinical utility data for Guardant360 platform to be presented at ASCO 2015

Clinical utility data for Guardant360 platform to be presented at ASCO 2015

Guardant Health today announced that five abstracts submitted by the University of California, San Francisco; University of California, San Diego; and MD Anderson highlighting the performance and clinical utility of Guardant360 have been accepted for oral and poster presentations at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, May 29-June 2. [More]
Overweight and inflammation during adolescence may increase colorectal cancer risk later in life

Overweight and inflammation during adolescence may increase colorectal cancer risk later in life

Being very overweight in your teens doubles the risk of developing colorectal cancer later in life compared to those whose weight was within the normal range a new Swedish study suggests. The research team behind the study are from örebro University in Sweden and Harvard School of Public Health in the US. [More]
LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

Celiac disease-safe wheat, premature infant pain detection, and new medicines to fight flu and cancer are among the ideas to receive $2.9 million in funding from Washington's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF). [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify new therapy to treat lung cancer

Johns Hopkins researchers identify new therapy to treat lung cancer

A multidisciplinary team led by Johns Hopkins researcher Venu Raman, Ph.D., with notable contributions from Guus Bol, Farhad Vesuna and Phuoc Tran of Johns Hopkins, has identified a new therapy for lung cancer, the most common cancer worldwide. The therapy has been in development for six years and involves a first-in-class molecule designed by the team. [More]
Study finds new colon cancer screening as promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans

Study finds new colon cancer screening as promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans

In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine found that a new non-invasive technology for colon cancer screening is a promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans. [More]
Study quantifies different mutational profiles of tumour cell clusters in patients with bowel cancer

Study quantifies different mutational profiles of tumour cell clusters in patients with bowel cancer

Bowel cancer is often driven by mutations in one of several different genes, and a patient can have a cancer with a different genetic make-up to another patient's cancer. Identifying the molecular alterations involved in each patient's cancer enables doctors to choose drugs that best target specific alterations. [More]
Drug combination lengthens lives of metastatic colorectal cancer patients

Drug combination lengthens lives of metastatic colorectal cancer patients

A drug developed 50 years ago and abandoned because it was considered to be too toxic has gained a second life in an international clinical trial. Research led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute showed the drug and a potentiating agent lengthened the lives of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, all of whom had exhausted available standard treatments. [More]

UEG survey identifies significant variation in current provision of endoscopy services across Europe

Successful implementation of pan-European colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes may be pushing endoscopy services to the limit, according to experts from United European Gastroenterology. [More]
Study evaluates VolitionRx's proprietary Nucleosomics platform in most prevalent cancers

Study evaluates VolitionRx's proprietary Nucleosomics platform in most prevalent cancers

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing blood-based diagnostic tests for a broad range of cancer types and other conditions, today announced that it has accelerated its large independent prospective study evaluating its proprietary Nucleosomics platform at University Hospital Bonn in Germany. [More]
Experimental gene therapy holds promise against metastatic prostate cancer

Experimental gene therapy holds promise against metastatic prostate cancer

Even with the best available treatments, the median survival of patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer is only two to three years. Driven by the need for more effective therapies for these patients, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine have developed a unique approach that uses microscopic gas bubbles to deliver directly to the cancer a viral gene therapy in combination with an experimental drug that targets a specific gene driving the cancer's growth. [More]
Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

A new animal study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, led by Dr. Christos Mantzoros, indicates that a diet containing walnuts may slow colorectal tumor growth by causing beneficial changes in cancer genes. [More]
Mixture of two anti-EGFR antibodies clinically active in treatment-resistant colorectal cancer

Mixture of two anti-EGFR antibodies clinically active in treatment-resistant colorectal cancer

Patients with advanced colorectal tumors without mutations in the RAS genes derive substantial benefit from anti-EGFR therapies; however, the disease eventually progresses, leaving these patients with few alternative therapeutic options. [More]
Roche announces FDA approval of cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use

Roche announces FDA approval of cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use

Roche today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the cobas KRAS Mutation Test for diagnostic use. The real-time PCR test is designed to identify KRAS mutations in tumor samples from metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and aid clinicians in determining a therapeutic path for them. [More]
Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many adults in the U.S. are not getting the recommended screening tests for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers, according to data published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. For 2013, screening for these types of cancers either fell behind previous rates or showed no improvement. [More]
Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Writing in the April 30 online issue of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report pancreatic cancer rates are highest in countries with the least amount of sunlight. Low sunlight levels were due to a combination of heavy cloud cover and high latitude. [More]
Special issue of Gastroenterology highlights how food impacts health and disease

Special issue of Gastroenterology highlights how food impacts health and disease

Patients are always interested in understanding what they should eat and how it will impact their health. Physicians are just as interested in advancing their understanding of the major health effects of foods and food-related diseases. [More]
Check-Cap announces Notice of Allowance from USPTO for endoscopy capsule technology

Check-Cap announces Notice of Allowance from USPTO for endoscopy capsule technology

Check-Cap Ltd., a clinical stage medical diagnostics company engaged in the development of a preparation-free ingestible imaging capsule that utilizes low-dose X-rays for the screening for colorectal cancer, today announced receipt of a Notice of Allowance from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for patent application U.S. 13/825,018 entitled, "Estimation of Distances and Size of Lesions in the Colon with an Imaging Capsule." [More]
New analysis finds that rates of health insurance coverage vary by demographics, cancer type

New analysis finds that rates of health insurance coverage vary by demographics, cancer type

A new analysis has found that, among patients with cancer, rates of health insurance coverage vary by patient demographics and by cancer type. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that the expansion of coverage through the Affordable Care Act may disproportionally benefit certain patient populations. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement