Colorectal Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colorectal Cancer News and Research

Colorectal Cancer is cancer that develops in the colon (the longest part of the large intestine) and/or the rectum (the last several inches of the large intestine before the anus). In the United States, it is the fourth most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it is often curable.
ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be effective for detecting ulcerative colitis

ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be effective for detecting ulcerative colitis

A minimally invasive screening for ulcerative colitis, a debilitating gastrointestinal tract disorder, using emerging infrared technology could be a rapid and cost-effective method for detecting disease that eliminates the need for biopsies and intrusive testing of the human body, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may not reduce colorectal cancer risk

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may not reduce colorectal cancer risk

Long-term use of the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins does not appear to decrease a patient's risk of colorectal cancer, suggests a new, large case-control study from Penn Medicine researchers published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. [More]
Flat adenomas may warrant keeping closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer

Flat adenomas may warrant keeping closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer

Being on the lookout for certain features of polyps may help physicians keep a closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer. [More]
Epigenomics receives FDA approval for Epi proColon®

Epigenomics receives FDA approval for Epi proColon®

Epigenomics AG, the German-American cancer molecular diagnostics company, has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Company’s lead product, Epi proColon®, the first and only FDA-approved blood-based colorectal cancer screening test. [More]
Moffitt study reports that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy

Moffitt study reports that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy

Radiation is a commonly used therapeutic option to treat liver metastases, with the majority of tumors maintained under control after one year. However, some patients do not respond as well to radiation treatment, and the factors that predict patient outcomes are unclear. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy based on the location of the primary tumor. [More]
Study shows epidermal growth factor negatively regulates shedding of epithelial cells

Study shows epidermal growth factor negatively regulates shedding of epithelial cells

The lining of the intestine is the most rapidly-renewing tissue in the body. Routine shedding of epithelial cells from this lining is a key element of tissue turnover, and is thus essential to maintaining optimal health. Altered shedding is associated with multiple disorders, ranging from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to colorectal cancer. [More]
USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

Whether you like your coffee black, decaf, half-caff or even instant, feel free to drink up. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center of Keck Medicine of USC have found that coffee consumption decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
Researchers develop metastasis-on-a-chip system to advance cancer investigation, drug discovery

Researchers develop metastasis-on-a-chip system to advance cancer investigation, drug discovery

Advances in personalized medicine allow doctors to select the most promising drugs for certain types of malignant tumors. [More]
Secondary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma a concern for CML patients using TKIs

Secondary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma a concern for CML patients using TKIs

Patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia who use the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib may be three to four times more likely to develop non-Hodgkin's lymphoma than the general population, study findings indicate. [More]
Prognostic test could help lower cancer recurrence for colorectal patients

Prognostic test could help lower cancer recurrence for colorectal patients

Colorectal cancer, one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States, is not a commonly discussed disease. Often symptomless in early stages, the cancer is more difficult to treat as it progresses, requiring chemotherapy in later stages. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are working on a way to identify patients who would benefit from chemotherapy before the cancer progresses. [More]
Screening colonoscopy program brings down colorectal cancer rates in Germany

Screening colonoscopy program brings down colorectal cancer rates in Germany

The introduction of screening colonoscopy in Germany is showing results: Within ten years of the start of this screening program for the early detection of colorectal cancer, the number of new cases has significantly dropped in the age groups 55 years and over. [More]
NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have discovered that a deficiency in a key protein that regulates immune system warning signals could be a new biomarker for colorectal cancer, the second largest cancer killer in the United States. They believe the marker could be used to gauge response to a potential new treatment for the disease. [More]
VolitionRx's NuQ blood test accurately detects 86% of subjects with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

VolitionRx's NuQ blood test accurately detects 86% of subjects with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

VolitionRx Limited today announced preliminary data from a pilot study demonstrating that the Company’s NuQ® blood test detected 86% of subjects with a deadly lung disease, called Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Regular use of aspirin significantly reduces overall cancer risk

Regular use of aspirin significantly reduces overall cancer risk

An analysis of data from two major, long-term epidemiologic studies finds that the regular use of aspirin significantly reduces the overall risk of cancer, a reduction that primarily reflects a lower risk of colorectal cancer and other tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
Mapping family health history could drive patients to more timely screenings

Mapping family health history could drive patients to more timely screenings

Most doctors and nurses review a patient's family history to identify risk factors for heart disease and cancer, often through a paper checklist or brief interview. [More]
Latinas who eat processed meats at increased risk for breast cancer

Latinas who eat processed meats at increased risk for breast cancer

Latinas who eat processed meats such as bacon and sausage may have an increased risk for breast cancer, according to a new study that did not find the same association among white women. [More]
High-fat diet may make intestinal stem cells to become cancerous

High-fat diet may make intestinal stem cells to become cancerous

Over the past decade, studies have found that obesity and eating a high-fat, high-calorie diet are significant risk factors for many types of cancer. Now, a new study from Whitehead Institute and MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research reveals how a high-fat diet makes the cells of the intestinal lining more likely to become cancerous. [More]
Discovery highlights need to improve patient education about genomics

Discovery highlights need to improve patient education about genomics

An overwhelming majority of people with incurable cancer want to hear findings from DNA sequencing of their own tumors and normal cells, and to learn how those results may affect their health and treatment options, Dana Farber Cancer Institute scientists report. [More]
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