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Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

This winter was one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. [More]
Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

According to a meta-analysis published in BMC Family Practice, high dose zinc acetate lozenges shortened the duration of common-cold associated nasal discharge by 34%, nasal congestion by 37%, scratchy throat by 33%, and cough by 46%. [More]
Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

For infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), something as simple as a common cold or ear infection can be fatal. Born with an incomplete immune system, kids who have SCID--also known as "bubble boy" or "bubble baby" disease--can't fight off even the mildest of germs. [More]
Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults over the age of 30 only catch flu about twice a decade, a new study suggests. Flu-like illness can be caused by many pathogens, making it difficult to assess how often people are infected by influenza. [More]
Kinsa Groups launched to monitor overall health of children in U.S. public schools

Kinsa Groups launched to monitor overall health of children in U.S. public schools

Kinsa, the maker of the first FDA approved app-enabled smartphone thermometer, today announced the launch of Kinsa Groups for its iOS and Android apps. The Groups feature is currently available for public schools across the United States. With Kinsa Groups, parents can monitor the overall health at their child's school to better track, treat, and stop the spread of illness at the earliest signs of symptoms. [More]
Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

With the chill of winter comes a spike in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which spreads more easily as people retreat indoors and come into close contact. The lung infection triggers persistent coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing, and is particularly hard on the very young and the very old. In fact, pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among U.S. children, with estimated medical costs of $1 billion annually. [More]
Overview of chlamydia trachomatis infections

Overview of chlamydia trachomatis infections

RnRMarketResearch.com adds "Chlamydia Trachomatis Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 2015" research to its store. [More]
New research finds that more frequent hugs protect people from stress, infection

New research finds that more frequent hugs protect people from stress, infection

Instead of an apple, could a hug-a-day keep the doctor away? According to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, that may not be that far-fetched of an idea. [More]
New diagnostic system describes symptoms using the image of patient's tongue

New diagnostic system describes symptoms using the image of patient's tongue

Physicians often ask their patients to "Please stick out your tongue". The tongue can betray signs of illness, which combined with other symptoms such as a cough, fever, presence of jaundice, headache or bowel habits, can help the physician offer a diagnosis. For people in remote areas who do not have ready access to a physician, a new diagnostic system is reported in the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology that works to combine the soft inputs of described symptoms with a digital analysis of an image of the patient's tongue. [More]
Empathic partnership: A health care model for marginalized populations

Empathic partnership: A health care model for marginalized populations

Sitting on an exam table in a flimsy gown can intimidate anyone. If you also happen to be lesbian, gay or bisexual, the experience can be even worse. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a Phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. The candidate vaccine, which was co-developed by the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
Aseptika launches Contactless Thermometer and Pulse Oximeter

Aseptika launches Contactless Thermometer and Pulse Oximeter

With the winter flu and cold season almost upon us we can stock up and take some steps to prepare at home for this eventuality. Having a flu jab, eating well, getting lots of exercise and sleep, and maintain good personal hygiene all help in preventing flu and colds. [More]
UL research unlocks major scientific challenge that has potential for rapid diagnostics tools

UL research unlocks major scientific challenge that has potential for rapid diagnostics tools

Research from the University of Limerick has unlocked a major scientific challenge which has exciting potential for point of care medical tests. The research entitled ‘Nanoelectrical analysis of single molecules and atomic-scale materials at the solid/liquid interface’ is reported online in Nature Materials. [More]
Study shows diphenhydramine suppresses cough reflex sensitivity with Dr. Cocoa formulation

Study shows diphenhydramine suppresses cough reflex sensitivity with Dr. Cocoa formulation

Cough is among the most common complaints for which patients seek medical attention. Leading cough researcher Peter V. Dicpinigaitis, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine at New York's Albert Einstein College of Medicine, recently conducted a new cough challenge study among adults, whose results were first presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in September 2014. [More]
Researchers find new clues to how common cold can trigger asthma

Researchers find new clues to how common cold can trigger asthma

Researchers have identified a molecular mechanism that could explain why the common cold can bring on life-threatening asthma attacks. [More]
Researchers explain why people with asthma have hard time dealing with respiratory viruses

Researchers explain why people with asthma have hard time dealing with respiratory viruses

People with asthma often have a hard time dealing with respiratory viruses such as the flu or the common cold, and researchers have struggled to explain why. [More]
Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

In the case of a cough or a sore throat, the doctor can usually diagnose a common cold immediately. However, the diagnosis of hereditary illnesses like cystic fibrosis, which affects the metabolism, or Huntington's disease, which leads to cognitive decline, is much more complex. [More]
Urgent Care for Kids plans to add four new clinics throughout Texas

Urgent Care for Kids plans to add four new clinics throughout Texas

Urgent Care for Kids announced plans to enter the Austin market and add four new clinics throughout the state. The practice is slated to open two new Houston-area clinics as well as two clinics in the greater Austin area by the end of the summer. Urgent Care for Kids selected these areas by identifying key growth markets where it can respond to increased demand for high quality after-hours pediatric care. [More]
Vertex receives positive opinion from European CHMP for approval of KALYDECO for cystic fibrosis

Vertex receives positive opinion from European CHMP for approval of KALYDECO for cystic fibrosis

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated today announced that the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use has issued a positive opinion recommending the approval of KALYDECO (ivacaftor) for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) ages 6 and older who have one of eight non-G551D gating mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. [More]
GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics publish special collection on genetics of immunity

GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics publish special collection on genetics of immunity

Immunity is what stops you dying from a common cold or a tiny pinprick. Differences in resistance or tolerance to disease influence who catches the bug that's going around the office, or which species succumb to the deadly fungus devastating frogs around the world. [More]
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