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Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Rural residents who commonly seek treatment for advanced stages of colorectal cancer have been thought to lack access to cancer screening and adjuvant therapy. ... Several theories have been postulated to explain these findings, some of which include low socioeconomic status, lower educational attainment, lack of insurance coverage, underinsurance, and travel distance to health care facilities. [More]

Looking forward: How to judge the rollout; challenges to come

Following the official end of the enrollment season, some outlets turn their attention to the upcoming issues surrounding the law. [More]

Va. Gov.'s Medicaid expansion proposal denied

Republicans in a House committee rejected the proposal, which is holding up a two-year budget deal. Gov. Terry McAuliffe tried to shake up Virginia's deadlocked Medicaid debate Monday by proposing a new budget that would expand the health care program and shower a projected $225 million in related savings on teachers, state employees, pre-kindergarten programs and other Democratic priorities (Vozzella, 3/24). [More]
Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

As a group, jail-involved individuals, which we define here as people with a history of arrest and jail admission in the recent past, carry a heavy illness burden, with high rates of infectious and chronic disease as well as mental illness and substance use. [More]
RAND study ignores data pointing to success of PCMH care model, say physicians

RAND study ignores data pointing to success of PCMH care model, say physicians

Pennsylvania's physicians say a new study by researchers at the RAND Corporation in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) ignores the wealth of recent data pointing to the success of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) care model that gives patients more control of their health care. [More]
Study examines effects of pay-for-performance-reimbursing health care in China's Ningxia Province

Study examines effects of pay-for-performance-reimbursing health care in China's Ningxia Province

Pay-for-performance-reimbursing health care providers based on the results they achieved with their patients as a way to improve quality and efficiency-has become a major component of health reforms in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other affluent countries. Although the approach has also become popular in the developing world, there has been little evaluation of its impact. [More]
Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors can be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers

Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors can be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers

Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream can potentially be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers, monitor responses to treatment and help explain why some cancers are resistant to therapies, according to results of an international study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. [More]
Telemedicine used at nursing homes is a viable way to reduce avoidable hospitalizations

Telemedicine used at nursing homes is a viable way to reduce avoidable hospitalizations

Telemedicine used at nursing homes during hours when doctors are not typically present is a viable way to reduce avoidable hospitalizations, according to research published in February's issue of Health Affairs. [More]
Cystic Fibrosis Center receives Quality Care Award for commitment to improve quality of care in CF patients

Cystic Fibrosis Center receives Quality Care Award for commitment to improve quality of care in CF patients

The Cystic Fibrosis Center at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital has been selected by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) for the foundation's prestigious Quality Care Award for 2012-2013. [More]

More insurers extend premium payment deadlines

The relaxed timetables reflect efforts by the insurance industry, as well as the Obama administration, to "coax" people towards "cementing" their 2014 coverage, reports Bloomberg News. In addition, a Commonwealth survey finds more people are shopping on the new health insurance marketplaces. News outlets also report developments from Minnesota, California, Oregon, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Michigan. [More]

First Edition: January 9, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about how the politics of the health law continue to play out on Capitol Hill. [More]

Research roundup: ACA 'can survive' low enrollment; rural/urban differences in O.B. Care; teaching residents cost consciousness

The Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) was launched in 2013 as a mechanism to obtain timely information on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) ... HRMS data from summer 2013 show that more than 60 percent of those targeted by the health insurance exchanges struggle with understanding key health insurance concepts. [More]

Get ready to pay more for health coverage, but it may not be just health law's fault

Although many blame the health law for all recent health care cost increases, trends that bump up the cost of care were in place before the law was enacted and are being driven up even more by routine costs, some say. [More]
First Edition: December 20, 2013

First Edition: December 20, 2013

Today's headlines include reports about the action taken by the administration to relax a health law requirement just four days before the deadline. [More]

Massachusetts residents have broader health insurance coverage, greater access to primary care

In 2006, Massachusetts was on the same brink that the entire nation is on today: the brink of expanding health insurance to cover far more people than before, through government-driven, market-based reform. [More]
Study helps explain why survival gap persists for African-Americans with head and neck cancer

Study helps explain why survival gap persists for African-Americans with head and neck cancer

A team of scientists at Johns Hopkins and in Texas has identified a handful of genetic mutations in black Americans, in addition to some chemical alterations affecting gene activity, which may help explain why the death rate among African-Americans from the most common form of head and neck cancer continues to hover some 18 percent higher above the death rate of whites with the same cancer. [More]

Refusing Medicaid expansion to cost states billions, study says

The decision not to participate will costs states billions over the next decade which will be passed onto taxpayers, according to a study by the pro-reform Commonwealth Fund. [More]

Viewpoints: Coping with physician shortage; 'righteous' hobby lobby cause; enrolling millennials

In just over a decade the United States will need 130,000 more doctors than medical schools are producing. So says the Association of American Medical Colleges, which warns of a doctor shortage that will drive up wait times, shorten office visits and make it harder for Americans to access the care they need (Scott Gottlieb and Ezekiel J. Emanuel, 12/4). [More]

State exchanges report November surge

Still, reports on the ground vary -- with some states offering positive news, while others still are limping along. Here is a sampling of coverage from Kentucky, Minnesota, Illinois, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon and Massachusetts. [More]
First Edition: November 25, 2013

First Edition: November 25, 2013

Today's headlines include reports about how political concerns and strategies are taking shape as a result of healthcare.gov's difficulties. [More]