Congestive Heart Failure News and Research RSS Feed - Congestive Heart Failure News and Research

Congestive Heart Failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump blood the way it should. In some cases, the heart can't fill with enough blood. In other cases, the heart can't send blood to the rest of the body with enough force. Some people have both problems. "Heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. However, it's a serious condition that requires medical care. Heart failure develops over time as the pumping of the heart grows weaker. It can affect the right side of the heart only or both the left and right sides of the heart. Most cases involve both sides of the heart.
PAH disease burden ‘significant’

PAH disease burden ‘significant’

Patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary arterial hypertension have a substantial burden of disease, with more than half hospitalised during the first 3 years post-diagnosis, research shows. [More]
Mercy Memorial Hospital System signs LOI to join Promedica

Mercy Memorial Hospital System signs LOI to join Promedica

Mercy Memorial Hospital System signed a letter of intent to join ProMedica, a not-for-profit, multi-hospital system based in Toledo, Ohio. [More]
UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical leader, and Dermira, Inc., a privately held US-based dermatology company, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive licensing agreement for the development and future commercialization of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) in dermatology. [More]
Poll: 5 percent of 2013 uninsured now have coverage

Poll: 5 percent of 2013 uninsured now have coverage

The Gallup survey pegged the uninsured rate at 13 percent. Meanwhile, in exchange news, The Denver Post notes increased sign-ups, and Oregon works to retain workers for its troubled marketplace. [More]
Six essential screening tests all men should receive during lifetime

Six essential screening tests all men should receive during lifetime

When it's comes men and health, the numbers don't stack up. Compared to women, men are 24 percent less likely than women to visit the doctor, according to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Yet, men are 28 percent more likely than women to be hospitalized for congestive heart failure and 32 percent more likely to receive care for complication of diabetes. [More]
Risk factors for hospital readmissions identified in stroke patients

Risk factors for hospital readmissions identified in stroke patients

Hospital readmission, an important measure of quality care, costs the United States an estimated $17 billion each year. And according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, about half of those readmissions could be avoided. [More]
iGetBetter selects Validic platform to access data from broad range of biometric devices

iGetBetter selects Validic platform to access data from broad range of biometric devices

iGetBetter, Inc., a supplier of post-acute care transition solutions, and Validic, the healthcare industry's premier technology platform for accessing digital health data, announced today that iGetBetter has selected the Validic platform to access data from a broad range of available biometric devices as part of its care transition solution focused on reducing readmissions. [More]
PointRight releases PointRight Pro 30 to track and reduce rehospitalization rates

PointRight releases PointRight Pro 30 to track and reduce rehospitalization rates

PointRight Inc., providing industry-standard analytics for healthcare providers and payers, announces the release of PointRight® Pro 30™, an upgraded version of its popular tools leveraging big data to track and reduce rehospitalization rates in long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
New book documents groundbreaking studies on modified citrus pectin

New book documents groundbreaking studies on modified citrus pectin

One of the nation's leading writers on the use of naturopathic medicine has released a new book documenting groundbreaking studies on modified citrus pectin (MCP) and its application for addressing serious health issues like cancer, heart disease, chronic inflammation and fibrosis. [More]
FDA approves Trimel’s Natesto nasal gel to treat adult males with low testosterone

FDA approves Trimel’s Natesto nasal gel to treat adult males with low testosterone

Trimel Pharmaceuticals Corporation announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Natesto (testosterone), formerly CompleoTRT, the first and only testosterone nasal gel for replacement therapy in adult males for conditions associated with a deficiency or absence of endogenous testosterone. [More]
Sanofi presents Phase II trial results for investigational vaccine for prevention of CDI

Sanofi presents Phase II trial results for investigational vaccine for prevention of CDI

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, presented Phase II (H-030-012) trial results for an investigational vaccine for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection at the 114th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Higher BMI linked with reduced mortality risk in patients with pulmonary hypertension

Higher BMI linked with reduced mortality risk in patients with pulmonary hypertension

In patients with congestive heart failure, obesity and a larger waist size have paradoxically been associated with a better prognosis in the prior investigations. This effect, known as the obesity paradox phenomenon, is now being demonstrated in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. [More]
Investigators find effective treatment for life-threatening angioedema attacks in ED

Investigators find effective treatment for life-threatening angioedema attacks in ED

Investigators at the University of Cincinnati have found a safe and effective treatment for life-threatening angioedema attacks in the emergency department. [More]
Intensive insulin treatment improves survival for diabetic heart attack patients

Intensive insulin treatment improves survival for diabetic heart attack patients

Long-term follow-up of the DIGAMI 1 trial – a landmark study of type 2 diabetes in Sweden – shows that intensive insulin treatment prolonged life by more than 2 years in patients with diabetes after a heart attack, compared with standard treatment for diabetes, reports Dr Viveca Ritsinger from the Unit of Cardiology of the Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden and colleagues in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. [More]
Study reveals sea salt and table salt have equivalent sodium content

Study reveals sea salt and table salt have equivalent sodium content

Pink Himalayan, Breton Gray and Hawaiian Alea - the newer offerings of salt may be exotic, cost more and frequent the shelves of high-end stores, but they are just as bad for you as common table salt. [More]
Cumberland launches new Vaprisol product

Cumberland launches new Vaprisol product

Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced the launch of its active promotional campaign to support its new Vaprisol® product. [More]
Rice University researchers find new possibilities for benign, 'tunable' virus

Rice University researchers find new possibilities for benign, 'tunable' virus

Rice University scientists have designed a tunable virus that works like a safe deposit box. It takes two keys to open it and release its therapeutic cargo. [More]
UCB announces results from PRECiSE clinical trial of Cimzia in patients with Crohn's disease

UCB announces results from PRECiSE clinical trial of Cimzia in patients with Crohn's disease

UCB announced today results from the PRECiSE 3 7-year open label extension clinical trial of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol), the longest continuous trial of an anti-TNF therapy evaluating long-term safety in Crohn's disease. [More]
Standard test that measures everyday activities may help prevent rapid return to inpatient care

Standard test that measures everyday activities may help prevent rapid return to inpatient care

Patients freshly discharged from acute care hospitals with low scores on a standard test that measures how well they perform such everyday activities as moving from a bed to a chair are far more likely to need readmission to a hospital within 30 days than those who score better, according to new Johns Hopkins research. [More]
Researchers find links between hospital readmission rates and social factors

Researchers find links between hospital readmission rates and social factors

Factors like the level of poverty in a neighborhood, living alone, and age affect a patient's chances of being readmitted to a hospital after discharge, even after possible variations in quality of care in the hospital have been taken into account. [More]