Constipation News and Research RSS Feed - Constipation News and Research

Constipation is a condition in which stool becomes hard, dry, and difficult to pass, and bowel movements don’t happen very often. Other symptoms may include painful bowel movements, and feeling bloated, uncomfortable, and sluggish.
New study shows link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS

New study shows link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large portion of the general population. New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet now shows a link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS. [More]
Tips and tricks to get children through pains of teething

Tips and tricks to get children through pains of teething

Your baby is growing up so fast. It seems like just yesterday you were welcoming them home, listening to their first coos and, unfortunately, getting used to some sleepless nights. [More]
Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

IBS is a common medical condition which is diagnosed in the presence of characteristic gastrointestinal symptoms including recurring bouts of abdominal pain and diarrhea and/or constipation. IBS patients also commonly report bloating and abdominal distension or swelling. [More]
Diagnosis and management of constipation may help protect kidney health

Diagnosis and management of constipation may help protect kidney health

Researchers have discovered a link between constipation and poor kidney health. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, suggest that the diagnosis and management of constipation might be helpful for preventing or treating kidney disease. [More]
Many back pain patients taking opioids get limited relief and worry about side effects, study finds

Many back pain patients taking opioids get limited relief and worry about side effects, study finds

Millions of people take opioids for chronic back pain, but many of them get limited relief while experiencing side effects and worrying about the stigma associated with taking them, suggests research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Clinical study reveals safety and efficacy of novel investigational colonoscopy prep

Clinical study reveals safety and efficacy of novel investigational colonoscopy prep

Detailed results from a Phase 2 study of a novel colonoscopy prep (ECP) under development by ColonaryConcepts, LLC show the investigational treatment to be at least as effective and safe as two currently available colonoscopy prep formulations, while offering a much higher level of patient satisfaction and preference than standard preps. [More]
Patients with hypothyroidism have nagging symptoms despite normal TSH tests, medication use

Patients with hypothyroidism have nagging symptoms despite normal TSH tests, medication use

About 15 percent of the 10-12 million people in the U.S. with hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, continue to feel sick despite following the standard of care recommended by the American Thyroid Association. [More]
Alternative therapies appear to be effective in ameliorating IBS symptoms

Alternative therapies appear to be effective in ameliorating IBS symptoms

A new review looks at the evidence behind the effectiveness of complementary or alternative therapies-including probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, fiber, and herbal medicinal products-for the treatment of bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional constipation, and ulcerative colitis. [More]
FDA recommends consumers to stop using homeopathic teething tablets and gels

FDA recommends consumers to stop using homeopathic teething tablets and gels

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers that homeopathic teething tablets and gels may pose a risk to infants and children. The FDA recommends that consumers stop using these products and dispose of any in their possession. [More]
Headache disorders may increase risk of thyroid condition

Headache disorders may increase risk of thyroid condition

Sufferers of migraines, cluster headaches, tension headaches or other headache disorders are at greater risk of developing a thyroid condition called hypothyroidism, according to a study by University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Low-FODMAP rye bread may reduce symptoms of IBS

Low-FODMAP rye bread may reduce symptoms of IBS

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are often concerned that certain foods may trigger or worsen their symptoms, which can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, or constipation. In a new study, patients who ate rye bread that was low in so-called "FODMAPs" (fermentable oligo- di- and mono-saccharides and polyols) experienced milder IBS symptoms than patients who ate normal rye bread. [More]
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

A new national survey by Health Union of more than 1,000 individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) reveals that the condition is difficult to diagnose and often even more difficult to treat. [More]
Food's transit time through colon affects health of digestive system

Food's transit time through colon affects health of digestive system

The time it takes for ingested food to travel through the human gut - also called transit time - affects the amount of harmful degradation products produced along the way. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

Although surgery can prolong the lives of patients with an aggressive type of cancer called malignant pleural mesothelioma, many patients avoid the operation for fear it will degrade their quality of life. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
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