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Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

Baby simulator programme ineffective in reducing risk of teenage pregnancy

A teenage pregnancy prevention programme involving a baby simulator does not appear to have any long-term effect on reducing the risk of teenage pregnancy, according to the first randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of this intervention, published in The Lancet today. [More]
New study shows some Catholic hospitals actively discourage referrals for reproductive services

New study shows some Catholic hospitals actively discourage referrals for reproductive services

Catholic hospitals, which represent a growing share of health care in the United States, prohibit staff from providing many common reproductive health services, including ones related to sterilization, contraception, abortion, and fertility. [More]
Travel advisory in place in Miami due to zika infection

Travel advisory in place in Miami due to zika infection

Pregnant women and their partners have been advised to avoid travelling to the Wynwood Arts District of Miami after the zika virus was transmitted by local mosquitoes. This is the first time ever that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has issued a travel advisory relating to a part of mainland United States. [More]
Women using contraception containing estrogen may have high vitamin D levels, study shows

Women using contraception containing estrogen may have high vitamin D levels, study shows

Women risk having their vitamin D levels fall when they stop using birth control pills or other contraceptives containing estrogen, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Report: Zika cases soar in Puerto Rico

Report: Zika cases soar in Puerto Rico

As of July 7, Zika has been diagnosed in 5,582 people, including 672 pregnant women, in Puerto Rico according to a new report published today in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
Exposure to infections in early life not linked to higher mortality risk during adulthood

Exposure to infections in early life not linked to higher mortality risk during adulthood

A new biological study by the University of Stirling has found that exposure to infections in early life does not have long-lasting consequences for later-life survival and reproduction. [More]
Gates Institute launches new global urban reproductive health program

Gates Institute launches new global urban reproductive health program

The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is launching The Challenge Initiative, a global urban reproductive health program supported by a three-year, $42 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

Amgen has announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved a variation to the marketing authorization for Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) to include use in combination with dexamethasone alone for adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The extended indication marks the second approval for Kyprolis by the EC in less than a year. [More]
Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Rates of teenage pregnancy in England have halved since the implementation of the Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS) in 1999, and the greatest effect is seen in areas of high deprivation and areas that received the most TPS funding, according to research published in The Lancet. [More]
Abortion rates at all-time low in developed countries, but unchanged in the developing world

Abortion rates at all-time low in developed countries, but unchanged in the developing world

Abortion rates have dropped to an all-time low in developed countries, but remain the same in developing countries, where it is often unsafe to have an abortion, report researchers. [More]
Lancet study finds unsafe sex as fastest-growing risk factor for ill health in young people

Lancet study finds unsafe sex as fastest-growing risk factor for ill health in young people

The Lancet Commission's groundbreaking report released today, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," finds that years of neglect and underinvestment have had serious detrimental effects on the health and wellbeing of adolescents aged 10-24 years. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Women account for approximately half of all individuals living with HIV worldwide, and researchers wanted to identify the risk factors that increase susceptibility of women to genital infection. [More]
Women with epilepsy have likelihood of achieving successful pregnancy just as healthy peers

Women with epilepsy have likelihood of achieving successful pregnancy just as healthy peers

Women with epilepsy are just as likely to achieve a successful pregnancy as women without the neurological disorder, according to a new study led by research teams at multiple centers, including NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Researchers reach milestone in developing non-hormonal approach to male contraception

Researchers reach milestone in developing non-hormonal approach to male contraception

Researchers studying strategies to develop a non-hormonal approach to male contraception have reached an important milestone in their work, discovering a way to produce a key enzyme found only in sperm in sufficient quantities that they can begin designing drugs to stop the sperm from swimming to the egg. [More]
Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

By spending less than $5 per person on essential health care services such as contraception, medication for serious illnesses and nutritional supplements, millions of maternal and child lives could be saved every year, according to a new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Zika threat to Olympics attendees? An interview with Prof. Eskild Petersen

Zika threat to Olympics attendees? An interview with Prof. Eskild Petersen

The risk in terms of the Olympics, especially for travelling populations remains low – with the notable exception of pregnant women. [More]
Oregon's new birth control law could improve access to all forms of contraception

Oregon's new birth control law could improve access to all forms of contraception

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University, University of Minnesota School of Public Health and George Mason University applaud Oregon's new birth control law which allows women age 18 or older to obtain some methods of hormonal contraception directly from pharmacies, without having to visit a prescribing clinician, yet note how the law could go even further to improve access to all forms of contraception, according to a viewpoint article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association today. [More]
Simple tool for inserting intrauterine device may offer low-cost option for long-term contraception

Simple tool for inserting intrauterine device may offer low-cost option for long-term contraception

A simple tool designed for inserting an intrauterine device may offer women in the developing world a convenient, low-cost option for long-term contraception. [More]
Oral contraceptives increase rare stroke risk in obese women

Oral contraceptives increase rare stroke risk in obese women

Researchers have found that obese women taking oral contraceptives have an increased risk of cerebral venous thrombosis and should be educated about this risk accordingly. [More]
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