Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Obesity has been linked to "letter" changes at many different sites in the genome, yet these differences do not fully explain the variation in people's body mass index (BMI) or why some overweight people develop health complications while others don't. [More]
Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Thought leaders at U-CARS meeting to explore issues related to heart recovery and regeneration

Thought leaders at U-CARS meeting to explore issues related to heart recovery and regeneration

For many years, the answer to that question was unequivocally "No." But as the University of Utah School of Medicine's annual Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium will explore on Jan. 12-13, advances in treating heart failure are giving physicians, surgeons and researchers reason to hope the deadly disease might one day be defeated. [More]
Researchers develop novel tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients

Researchers develop novel tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients

For the first time, researchers have developed tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients by diagnosing the condition with greater accuracy, as well as by detecting the onset of congestive heart failure earlier. [More]
Frequent sauna bathing can reduce dementia risk, study finds

Frequent sauna bathing can reduce dementia risk, study finds

Frequent sauna bathing can reduce the risk of dementia, according to a recent study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. In a 20-year follow-up, men taking a sauna 4-7 times a week were 66% less likely to be diagnosed with dementia than those taking a sauna once a week. [More]
OrbusNeich launches new Dual Therapy Stent for active vessel healing

OrbusNeich launches new Dual Therapy Stent for active vessel healing

OrbusNeich has announced the launch of its latest generation Dual Therapy Stent (DTS), the COMBO Plus. [More]
Creating artery banks may transform treatment of heart and vascular ailments

Creating artery banks may transform treatment of heart and vascular ailments

The prospect of creating artery "banks" available for cardiovascular surgery, bypassing the need to harvest vessels from the patient, could transform treatment of many common heart and vascular ailments. [More]
High-intensity statin treatments increase survival rates in patients with cardiovascular disease

High-intensity statin treatments increase survival rates in patients with cardiovascular disease

A large national study has confirmed the value of high-intensity statin treatments for people with cardiovascular disease, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Researchers explore correlation between sugar intake and coronary artery disease

Researchers explore correlation between sugar intake and coronary artery disease

What connection is there between food and drink with added sugar and coronary artery disease? Until recently, the question had been inadequately answered by research, but an extensive study from Lund University in Sweden has now contributed important clues. [More]
Study of new polymer-free DFS indicates non-inferior in-stent late lumen loss at nine-months

Study of new polymer-free DFS indicates non-inferior in-stent late lumen loss at nine-months

A first-in-human study of a new polymer-free drug-filled stent, which provides controlled drug elution from an internal lumen, indicated non-inferior in-stent late lumen loss at nine-months compared with historical zotarolimus-eluting stent (Resolute) data. In addition, there was no binary restenosis, and a high degree of early stent strut coverage with minimal malapposition. [More]
NOBLE study shows superiority of CABG over PCI for treatment of left main coronary artery disease

NOBLE study shows superiority of CABG over PCI for treatment of left main coronary artery disease

Coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery is the standard treatment for revascularization in patients with left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease, but use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for this indication is increasing. [More]
Consumption of one egg per day linked to 12% reduction of stroke risk

Consumption of one egg per day linked to 12% reduction of stroke risk

On the heels of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans that placed no daily limit on dietary cholesterol and noted eggs are an affordable, accessible, nutrient-rich source of high quality protein, new research shows eggs are associated with a 12 percent reduction in the risk of stroke, the 5th leading cause of death in the United States. [More]
TCT 2016 features first report investigations on novel bioresorbable stents

TCT 2016 features first report investigations on novel bioresorbable stents

The 28th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT), the annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation featured a number of first report investigations on novel stents that could become the next generation of bioresorbable stents in patients. [More]
Stents can be as effective as surgery for many patients with left main coronary artery disease

Stents can be as effective as surgery for many patients with left main coronary artery disease

A major international study has found that drug-eluting stents, a less-invasive alternative to bypass surgery, are as effective as surgery for many patients with a blockage in the left main coronary artery. [More]
OCT offers safe and better guidance for patients undergoing PCI to treat coronary artery disease

OCT offers safe and better guidance for patients undergoing PCI to treat coronary artery disease

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides safe and improved guidance for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat coronary artery disease, according to results from the ILLUMIEN III: OPTIMIZE PCI trial. [More]
Researchers recruit 20,000th participant to landmark genetics study to improve risk prediction of coronary disease

Researchers recruit 20,000th participant to landmark genetics study to improve risk prediction of coronary disease

A team of researchers from the University of Leicester and NIHR Leicester Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit (LCBRU) in conjunction with colleagues from Primary Care and Leicester and Leicestershire CCGs have recruited their 20,000th participant to a landmark genetics study. [More]
CTA tests motivate people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices

CTA tests motivate people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices

UCLA researchers have found that undergoing a computer tomographic angiography was a better motivator to get people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices than an exercise electrocardiography and stress test. [More]
Study to investigate clinical impact of new treatment for HFrEF patients

Study to investigate clinical impact of new treatment for HFrEF patients

The academic partners in the VerICiguaT GlObal Study in Subjects with Heart Failure with Reduced EjectIon FrAction are pleased to announce that patient enrollment has begun. [More]
Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer. [More]
Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

Duke, Wisconsin and UAB researchers create bioengineered patches to treat heart failure

The heart cannot regenerate muscle tissue after a heart attack has killed part of the muscle wall, and that dead tissue can strain surrounding muscle, leading to a lethal heart enlargement. [More]
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