Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions at ESC Congress 2015 are set to reveal the latest in cardiovascular disease research across a range of conditions and comorbidities. Hot topics include atrial fibrillation, pacing, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pharmacology and coronary artery disease. [More]
Boston Scientific commences new study to evaluate fully resorbable drug-eluting scaffold system

Boston Scientific commences new study to evaluate fully resorbable drug-eluting scaffold system

Boston Scientific has initiated a study of the company's first fully resorbable drug-eluting scaffold system. The Fully Absorbable Scaffold Feasibility Study (FAST) is a prospective, single arm study designed to assess the safety and performance of this next generation scaffold for the treatment of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. [More]
University Hospital recognized for providing high standard of care for heart attack patients

University Hospital recognized for providing high standard of care for heart attack patients

University of Missouri Health Care's University Hospital has received the American College of Cardiology's ACTION Registry-Get with the Guidelines (GWTG) Silver Performance Achievement Award for 2015. [More]
No significant research undertaken to prevent or treat PPCM in healthy pregnant women, study reveals

No significant research undertaken to prevent or treat PPCM in healthy pregnant women, study reveals

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare disorder characterized by weakened pumping of the heart, or "left ventricular dysfunction," which results in otherwise healthy pregnant women experiencing heart failure shortly before or up to five months after they deliver healthy babies. Despite the seriousness of this condition, a new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology revealed that no significant research has been undertaken to explore how to prevent or treat this disorder. [More]
Study examines accuracy, cost-effectiveness of new cholesterol guidelines in identifying increased CVD risk

Study examines accuracy, cost-effectiveness of new cholesterol guidelines in identifying increased CVD risk

An examination of the 2013 guidelines for determining statin eligibility, compared to guidelines from 2004, indicates that they are associated with greater accuracy and efficiency in identifying increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and presence of subclinical coronary artery disease, particularly in individuals at intermediate risk, according to a study in the July 14 issue of JAMA. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

A study to examine recessively inherited genome-wide DNA sequences has for the first time discovered a potential link with Britain's biggest killer - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). [More]
Coronary artery calcification scans can help identify patients at risk for early death

Coronary artery calcification scans can help identify patients at risk for early death

A study in the online edition of Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that coronary artery calcification (CAC) scans could help physicians identify patients at risk for premature death. [More]
Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins have been shown to reduce complications from cardiovascular surgery. To determine whether statins might also help those undergoing major lung surgeries, a team at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center conducted a well-designed study that randomized patients to receive either a statin or placebo before and after surgery. [More]
Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

A recent study presented at the American College of Cardiology 64th Annual Scientific Meeting evaluated the impact of an age, sex, and gene expression score on clinical decision-making and the rate of further cardiac evaluation in symptomatic female patients suggestive of CAD in the outpatient setting. [More]
Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

In recognition of 10 years of publication Future Cardiology has launched a special issue focused on recent advances and emerging challenges in specific areas of cardiology. [More]
Despite low value and high costs, certain preoperative tests still common in U.S.

Despite low value and high costs, certain preoperative tests still common in U.S.

Professional physician associations consider certain routine tests before elective surgery to be of low value and high cost, and have sought to discourage their utilization. [More]
2015 EuroHeartCare annual meeting to highlight recent advances in cardiovascular nursing research, practice

2015 EuroHeartCare annual meeting to highlight recent advances in cardiovascular nursing research, practice

The cardiovascular nursing event of the year is heading south to Croatia. EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). [More]
Lilly Diabetes Alliance, Boehringer Ingelheim to present study results at ADA’s Scientific Sessions

Lilly Diabetes Alliance, Boehringer Ingelheim to present study results at ADA’s Scientific Sessions

The presentation of 35 abstracts will demonstrate the breadth and depth of the Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company Diabetes alliance portfolio at the 75th American Diabetes Association's (ADA) Scientific Sessions® in Boston, June 5-9. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
NYU chemists find that microRNA can serve as 'decoder ring' for understanding biological functions

NYU chemists find that microRNA can serve as 'decoder ring' for understanding biological functions

MicroRNA can serve as a "decoder ring" for understanding complex biological processes, a team of New York University chemists has found. Their study, which appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, points to a new method for decrypting the biological functions of enzymes and identifying those that drive diseases. [More]
COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is associated with increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease such as heart failure or a heart attack, as well as diseases not associated with the heart. However, COPD is not by itself associated with increased likelihood of having a stroke or a systemic embolism, according to a new research study. [More]
Researchers use American College of Cardiology registry to improve cardiovascular care delivery in India

Researchers use American College of Cardiology registry to improve cardiovascular care delivery in India

Despite challenges, it is feasible to collect and study the quality of outpatient cardiovascular care in a resource-limited environment like India, according to a pilot study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association. [More]
Corus CAD test can help clinicians rule-out low-risk patients from additional cardiac testing

Corus CAD test can help clinicians rule-out low-risk patients from additional cardiac testing

CardioDx, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company specializing in cardiovascular genomics, announced today results from a multi-center, community-based patient registry, the PRESET Registry, evaluating the use of the Corus CAD test in patients with symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in the primary care setting. [More]
Post-operative atrial fibrillation can significantly increase risk of heart attack or stroke

Post-operative atrial fibrillation can significantly increase risk of heart attack or stroke

As many as 12 percent of patients undergoing major, non-cardiac surgery experience an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation. [More]
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