Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]
Abbott completes enrollment of 3 clinical trials to support approval of Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold

Abbott completes enrollment of 3 clinical trials to support approval of Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) today announced it has completed enrollment of three clinical trials to support approvals of the company's revolutionary Absorb™ Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS) in the United States, Japan and China. [More]

CardioCell receives IND approval for Phase IIa clinical study of itMSC therapy to treat heart failure

CardioCell LLC has just received the FDA's investigational new drug (IND) approval for a United States-based, Phase IIa clinical study using its allogeneic stem-cell therapy to treat subjects with chronic heart failure (CHF), which generates more than 1 million hospitalizations annually. [More]

FDA allows CryoLife to begin PerClot clinical trial in the U.S.

CryoLife, Inc., a leading medical device and tissue processing company focused on cardiac and vascular surgery, announced today that it has received approval of its Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) for PerClot from the United States Food and Drug Administration. [More]
Boston Scientific presents new data on cardiology-related clinical trials at ACC 2014

Boston Scientific presents new data on cardiology-related clinical trials at ACC 2014

Reinforcing its position as a global leader in bringing new therapies to patients with heart and cardiovascular disease, Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) reported favorable results in studies related to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), platinum chromium stent platforms and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). [More]
Injecting bone marrow derived stem cells directly into heart muscle improves heart function

Injecting bone marrow derived stem cells directly into heart muscle improves heart function

Patients with severe ischemic heart disease and heart failure can benefit from a new treatment in which stem cells found in bone marrow are injected directly into the heart muscle, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Newly identified protein markers have potential to contribute to better understanding of heart disease

Newly identified protein markers have potential to contribute to better understanding of heart disease

Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah, have discovered that elevated levels of two recently identified proteins in the body are inflammatory markers and indicators of the presence of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Celiac disease people may have near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease

Celiac disease people may have near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease

People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]
Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage is criticized for many things — justly and unjustly — but not heart disease, according to findings of a recent study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]

Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country - believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed - found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed. [More]

Lower levels of vitamin D predict extent of coronary artery disease

Vitamin D deficiency is an independent risk factor for heart disease with lower levels of vitamin D being associated with a higher presence and severity of coronary artery disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Consuming alcohol several times a week 'ups' risk of stroke mortality

Consuming alcohol several times a week 'ups' risk of stroke mortality

Consuming alcohol more frequently than twice a week increases the risk of stroke mortality in men, according to a study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The results show that the effects of alcohol are not limited to the amount consumed, but also the frequency of drinking matters. The results were published in Acta Neurologica Scandinavica on 8 March. [More]
Study: Three-fold spike in heart attacks continued six years after Hurricane Katrina

Study: Three-fold spike in heart attacks continued six years after Hurricane Katrina

Lingering stress from major disasters can damage health years later, according to a new Tulane University study that found a three-fold spike in heart attacks continued in New Orleans six years after Hurricane Katrina. [More]
Viewpoints: The impact of Florida's special election; drug testing for doctors; the toll from Alzheimer's

Viewpoints: The impact of Florida's special election; drug testing for doctors; the toll from Alzheimer's

A rule of electoral politics is that when a Democratic wave is building, the media broadcast it like a foregone conclusion. When a Republican wave is building, Beltway pundits are the last to admit it. After Tuesday's GOP win in a Florida special House election, even the press corps now agrees that Republicans are poised for major gains in November, assuming the GOP has the wit to exploit it (3/12). [More]
Microvascular coronary dysfunction in women may be triggered by emotional stress, say researchers

Microvascular coronary dysfunction in women may be triggered by emotional stress, say researchers

​Researchers at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that emotional stressors - such as those provoking anger - may cause changes in the nervous system that controls heart rate and trigger a type of coronary artery dysfunction that occurs more frequently in women than men. [More]

New blood test detects specific genes activated in individuals with obstructive CAD

Nearly $7 billion is spent each year in the U.S. on diagnostic testing of the estimated three million people with symptoms of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). [More]

Regado receives Fast Track designation from FDA for REG1

Regado Biosciences, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of actively controllable therapeutics, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration has designated REG1 for anticoagulant therapy to be used in patients with coronary artery disease during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) as a Fast Track development program. [More]
Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics, Inc. today announced fourth quarter and full-year 2013 financial results. For the three months ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net income was $24.0 million, or $1.10 per share, compared to net loss of $10.8 million, or $0.51 per share for the same period in 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net loss was $35.5 million, or $1.66 per share, compared to $39.4 million, or $1.88 per share for the same period in 2012. [More]