Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

A dozen awards from the National Institutes of Health will support research that incorporates DNA sequence information into electronic medical records. The goal of research conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is to better understand the genomic basis of disease and to tailor medical care to individual patients based on their genomic differences. [More]
Defibrillator does not improve outcomes in patients with CRT pacemaker

Defibrillator does not improve outcomes in patients with CRT pacemaker

Most patients with a cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) pacemaker would not benefit from the addition of a defibrillator, according to results from the CeRtiTuDe cohort study presented for the first time today at ESC Congress1 and published in European Heart Journal. [More]
Preoperative statins linked to reductions in cardiac complications, mortality after noncardiac surgery

Preoperative statins linked to reductions in cardiac complications, mortality after noncardiac surgery

Preoperative statins are associated with a 17% reduction in cardiac complications and a 43% reduction in mortality after noncardiac surgery, according to results from the VISION Study presented for the first time today at ESC Congress by Dr Otavio Berwanger, director of the Research Institute HCor, Hospital do Coração (Heart Hospital) in São Paulo, Brazil. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced results from PMSS (Post-Marketing Safety Surveillance) and XANTUS (XARELTO for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation), their landmark real-world studies evaluating the safety of XARELTO in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Non-invasive FFRCT test can reduce need for invasive tests in patients having chest pain

Non-invasive FFRCT test can reduce need for invasive tests in patients having chest pain

According to results of the PLATFORM (Prospective LongitudinAl Trial of FFRCT: Outcome and Resource Impacts) trial, a test known as FFRCT can obviate the need for invasive tests in up to 61% of patients who have chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. [More]
STEMI study: Absorbable stents perform similarly to metallic stents

STEMI study: Absorbable stents perform similarly to metallic stents

A drug-eluting coronary stent made of absorbable material performed similarly to the gold-standard metal one in a non-inferiority trial among patients with the more serious type of heart attack known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to results of the ABSORB STEMI TROFI II trial. [More]
Abbott reports positive results of ABSORB Japan study comparing efficacy of fully dissolving heart stent to XIENCE

Abbott reports positive results of ABSORB Japan study comparing efficacy of fully dissolving heart stent to XIENCE

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) announced today positive one-year clinical results from ABSORB Japan, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing the safety and effectiveness of Abbott's fully dissolving Absorb™ heart stent to XIENCE ®, Abbott's market-leading, permanent drug eluting stent. [More]
Prasugrel linked to high-bleeding-risk in patients with stable coronary artery disease

Prasugrel linked to high-bleeding-risk in patients with stable coronary artery disease

Prasugrel-based dual antiplatelet therapy is associated with increased major bleeding after stent implantation for high-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease, according to a secondary analysis of the BASKET-PROVE II trial presented at ESC Congress for the first time today. [More]
Young diabetic women have six-fold heart attack risk

Young diabetic women have six-fold heart attack risk

Women aged 45 years and under with diabetes have a six-fold risk of heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today.1 The study in more than 7 000 women also found that young women who had a heart attack (myocardial infarction, MI) were more likely to be smokers than older women with MI. [More]
Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US. [More]
Stroke prevention strategies in elderly should focus on multiple risk factors

Stroke prevention strategies in elderly should focus on multiple risk factors

The impact of atrial fibrillation on ischaemic stroke risk in elderly patients is eliminated with multiple risk factors, according to an 11 year study in more than 425 000 patients presented at ESC Congress today. [More]
Proportion of diabetes patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting rises from 7% to 37% in 40 years

Proportion of diabetes patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting rises from 7% to 37% in 40 years

In the 40 years between 1970-2010, the proportion of patients with diabetes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) escalated from 7% to 37%. The results of a large study from Cleveland Clinic just published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, the official publication of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, documents the five-fold increase in the proportion of patients with diabetes undergoing this procedure between 1970 and 2010. [More]
Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals having high blood levels of two closely related proteins experience few adverse health events

Individuals previously diagnosed with heart disease may be less likely to experience heart failure, heart attacks, or stroke, or to die from these events, if they have higher blood levels of two very closely related proteins, according to a new study led by a UC San Francisco research team. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center first in Illinois to offer new, noninvasive test for heart disease

Loyola University Medical Center first in Illinois to offer new, noninvasive test for heart disease

Loyola University Medical Center is the first and only hospital in Illinois to offer a new, noninvasive technology to test for coronary artery disease. [More]
ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

Members of the press will be the first to hear the highly anticipated results from global trials in six press conferences devoted to hot lines research. [More]
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out CAD in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain

Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out CAD in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain

Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation. [More]
Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

It is a paradox: Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and thus with oxygen. It has long been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process, but the exact mechanism has remained unclear. [More]
New VA study demonstrates cardiovascular benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

New VA study demonstrates cardiovascular benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

A Veterans Affairs database study of more than 83,000 patients found that men whose low testosterone was restored to normal through gels, patches, or injections had a lower risk of heart attack, stroke, or death from any cause, versus similar men who were not treated. [More]
Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions set to reveal latest research in cardiovascular disease at ESC Congress 2015

Six hot line sessions at ESC Congress 2015 are set to reveal the latest in cardiovascular disease research across a range of conditions and comorbidities. Hot topics include atrial fibrillation, pacing, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, pharmacology and coronary artery disease. [More]
Boston Scientific commences new study to evaluate fully resorbable drug-eluting scaffold system

Boston Scientific commences new study to evaluate fully resorbable drug-eluting scaffold system

Boston Scientific has initiated a study of the company's first fully resorbable drug-eluting scaffold system. The Fully Absorbable Scaffold Feasibility Study (FAST) is a prospective, single arm study designed to assess the safety and performance of this next generation scaffold for the treatment of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. [More]
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