Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

In middle aged populations, the risks of cardiovascular conditions are progressively lower the longer a person's parents lived past 69 years old, according to a study of 186,000 participants using a voluntary database published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Mayo Clinic launches new blood test that measures plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart disease

Mayo Clinic launches new blood test that measures plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart disease

Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). [More]
Small dense HDL particles protectively linked to coronary heart disease risk

Small dense HDL particles protectively linked to coronary heart disease risk

The idea that plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is protective against coronary heart disease has been part of medical conventional wisdom for five decades. [More]
Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

A cardiac imaging study led by Hossein Bahrami, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, along with investigators from Johns Hopkins University and five other institutions, showed a correlation between higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

According to a study carried out at the University of Helsinki, an infection of the root tip of a tooth increases the risk of coronary artery disease, even if the infection is symptomless. [More]
Sutter Health among the first to offer Absorb dissolving stent for patients with coronary artery disease

Sutter Health among the first to offer Absorb dissolving stent for patients with coronary artery disease

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Mills-Peninsula Health Services, both affiliates of Sutter Health, will be among the first in the country to offer patients with coronary artery disease a new treatment option, the Abbott Absorb stent, which literally disappears in the body over time. [More]
New study to examine genomics of anti-platelet therapy after coronary interventions

New study to examine genomics of anti-platelet therapy after coronary interventions

Which antiplatelet medication is best after a coronary stent? The Tailored Antiplatelet Therapy to Lessen Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (TAILOR-PCI) Study examines whether prescribing heart medication based on a patient's CYP2C19 genotype will help prevent heart attack, stroke, unstable angina, and cardiovascular death in patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), commonly called angioplasty. [More]
PinnacleHealth delivers ABSORB BVS device to first patient after FDA approval

PinnacleHealth delivers ABSORB BVS device to first patient after FDA approval

The same PinnacleHealth team that participated in a three-year clinical trial designed to evaluate potential benefits of a first-of-its-kind drug eluting ABSORB Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS), today announced it deployed the device for the first time after FDA approval for commercial use. [More]
Diabetic patients experience long-term survival outcomes with TAR/CABG surgery

Diabetic patients experience long-term survival outcomes with TAR/CABG surgery

Diabetic patients who undergo heart bypass surgery are living longer and have much better long-term outcomes when cardiothoracic surgeons use arteries rather than veins for the bypasses, according to a new study published online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events linked to decreased sexual activity in postmenopausal women

Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events linked to decreased sexual activity in postmenopausal women

Understanding the effects of age and disease on sexual wellbeing is crucial as sexual health is increasingly associated with vitality. In a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine, researchers looked at the role metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease play in postmenopausal women's sexual health. [More]
UH cardiologists implant first Abbott Absorb stent on patient with coronary artery disease

UH cardiologists implant first Abbott Absorb stent on patient with coronary artery disease

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is among the first in the country - and the first in Ohio - to offer and deploy the Abbott Absorb stent, a completely bioresorbable stent. [More]
UH implants Abbott's Absorb dissolving stent on coronary artery disease patient

UH implants Abbott's Absorb dissolving stent on coronary artery disease patient

University Hospitals Case Medical Center is among the first in the country - and the first in Ohio - to offer and deploy the Abbott Absorb stent, a completely bioresorbable stent. The Absorb stent works exactly as its traditional metallic predecessors in that it opens a blocked coronary artery, with one major exception - it dissolves completely in the body two to three years after implantation. [More]
Loyola among first health systems to offer absorbable stent to heart patients

Loyola among first health systems to offer absorbable stent to heart patients

Loyola Medicine will be among the first health systems in the country to offer heart patients a new stent that is absorbed by the body once it has served its purpose. [More]
miRNAs may improve risk prediction in CAD

miRNAs may improve risk prediction in CAD

Single microRNAs derived from peripheral blood predict cardiovascular mortality in patients with coronary artery disease, German research shows. [More]
FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. [More]
Radial access gains ground over femoral route for PCI

Radial access gains ground over femoral route for PCI

A meta-analysis supports that radial access delivers better outcomes and improved safety than femoral access in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. [More]
Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing worthwhile in sudden cardiac death

Genetic testing and family screening help to provide explanations for sudden cardiac death in children and young adults, shows a population-based study. [More]
Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Patients with a low Athens QRS score are highly likely to have coronary artery disease even if they have a normal exercise stress test, say researchers. [More]
AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine report that more than 1 in 3 atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at intermediate to high risk for stroke are treated with aspirin alone, despite previous data showing this therapy to be inferior to blood thinners. [More]
Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

The combination of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease can be deadly. New research from a global study led by a physician from UConn Health has found that patients with Type 2 diabetes admitted into the hospital for congestive heart failure face a one in four chance of dying over the next 18 months. [More]
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