Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
Specific gene mutation may significantly reduce risk of heart attack

Specific gene mutation may significantly reduce risk of heart attack

People with a specific gene mutation have a 50 percent lower risk of suffering a heart attack. This is what an international team of researchers headed by the cardiologist Prof. Heribert Schunkert, Medical Director of the German Heart Center at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), discovered in a broad comparative study. If this gene were switched off with medications it could reduce the risk of coronary disease significantly. [More]
Genetic errors may reduce heart attack risk, study finds

Genetic errors may reduce heart attack risk, study finds

To reduce risk of heart attack, the benefits of a healthy lifestyle are clear. But genetics can still stack the deck. Some people's genes bestow a natural advantage — or disadvantage — in protecting against heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. [More]
Common blood test could help predict risk of second stroke

Common blood test could help predict risk of second stroke

A new discovery about ischemic stroke may allow to doctors to predict a patient's risk of having a second stroke using a commonly performed blood test and their genetic profile. [More]
Heart attack patients experiencing cardiogenic shock at higher risk of death in first 60 days post-discharge

Heart attack patients experiencing cardiogenic shock at higher risk of death in first 60 days post-discharge

Heart attack patients who experience cardiogenic shock have a higher risk of death or rehospitalization than non-shock patients in the first 60 days post-discharge, but by the end of the first year, the gap between the two groups narrows, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Ultrasound-activated microbubbles help preserve healthy heart tissue

Ultrasound-activated microbubbles help preserve healthy heart tissue

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering used ultrasound-activated microbubbles to improve preservation of heart muscle and function in a pig heart attack model. [More]
University of Louisville researcher reveals potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes

University of Louisville researcher reveals potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes

While e-cigarette use is increasing worldwide, little is known about the health effects e-cigarettes pose for users. A University of Louisville researcher is working to change that status. [More]
New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

Our favourite foods could be made healthier thanks to a new technique developed by the University of Leicester which has identified harmful bacterial molecules in certain processed foods such as burgers and ready meals. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

A new blood clotting analysis system designed in Japan makes it easier to determine the effects of taking one or more antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs. [More]
Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Contrary to current clinical belief, regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats, which, while common, can lead in rare cases to heart- or stroke-related morbidity and mortality, according to UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Patients who receive information about coronary artery disease risk make improvements to health behaviors

Patients who receive information about coronary artery disease risk make improvements to health behaviors

A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital has found that providing unanticipated information about risk of coronary artery disease during a genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer's disease helped some participants cope with their results, and also motivated participants to make changes to their health behaviors. [More]
New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

A new classification of coronary congenital diseases is set to help surgeons identify secondary defects in the operating theatre. The scheme is outlined in a novel European Society of Cardiology position paper published today in Cardiovascular Research.1 Clinical cardiologists will also know what to look for on cardiovascular images. [More]
FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

FDA-approved, once-daily 24-hour aspirin now available for prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the availability by prescription of DURLAZA, the first and only 24-hour, extended-release aspirin capsules (162.5mg) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the secondary prevention of stroke and acute cardiac events, including myocardial infarction (heart attack) in high-risk cardiovascular patients. [More]
QT Vascular reports initial results from first-in-human study of Chocolate Heart drug-coated balloon

QT Vascular reports initial results from first-in-human study of Chocolate Heart drug-coated balloon

QT Vascular Ltd., together with its subsidiaries (the "Company" or "QT Vascular", and together with its subsidiaries, the "Group"), a global company engaged in the design, assembly and distribution of advanced therapeutic solutions for the minimally invasive treatment of vascular disease, announce today the release of the initial results from the first-in-human study of its unique drug-coated balloon, Chocolate Heart. [More]
Email communications between patients, physicians improve overall health

Email communications between patients, physicians improve overall health

A third of patients with chronic conditions who exchanged secure emails with their doctors said that these communications improved their overall health, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the American Journal of Managed Care. [More]
New mobile app empowers individuals to assess, enhance daily overall heart health

New mobile app empowers individuals to assess, enhance daily overall heart health

Leading cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, has developed a free mobile application called "Circle of Health" to empower individuals around the globe to take action to comprehensively assess and enhance their daily overall heart health. Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of mortality in the world. [More]
Sedentary behaviour worsens health of heart disease patients

Sedentary behaviour worsens health of heart disease patients

Patients with heart disease who sit a lot have worse health even if they exercise, reveals research from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention. [More]

Angina in women linked with abnormal heart blood flow

Chest pain in female-pattern heart disease is linked with abnormal heart blood flow, demonstrated with a drug commonly used to alleviate chest pain patients with coronary artery disease, which was found to be ineffective in patients with moderate female-pattern heart disease, but may offer some relief for sicker patients, a new Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute study shows. [More]
Vitamin D deficiency puts people at risk of developing heart problems

Vitamin D deficiency puts people at risk of developing heart problems

A lack of vitamin D can result in weak bones. Recent studies also show that vitamin D deficiency is linked to more serious health risks such as coronary artery disease, heart attacks, and strokes. [More]
New Haven Pharmaceuticals' DURLAZA drug delivers sustained antiplatelet control for full 24 hours

New Haven Pharmaceuticals' DURLAZA drug delivers sustained antiplatelet control for full 24 hours

New Haven Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced new study data that shows the company's FDA-approved drug DURLAZA delivers sustained antiplatelet control for a full 24-hour period in high-risk patients. [More]
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