Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
Testosterone therapy helps reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events in elderly men

Testosterone therapy helps reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events in elderly men

A new multi-year study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that testosterone therapy helped elderly men with low testosterone levels and pre-existing coronary artery disease reduce their risks of major adverse cardiovascular events — including strokes, heart attacks, and death. [More]
Heart disease patients who experience mental stress ischemia tend to have higher levels of troponin

Heart disease patients who experience mental stress ischemia tend to have higher levels of troponin

Some people with heart disease experience a restriction of blood flow to the heart in response to psychological stress. Usually silent (not painful), the temporary restriction in blood flow, called ischemia, is an indicator of greater mortality risk. [More]
Cholesterol drug evacetrapib fails to reduce risk of cardiovascular events

Cholesterol drug evacetrapib fails to reduce risk of cardiovascular events

Despite lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL), known as "bad" cholesterol, while markedly increasing levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, a large clinical trial to investigate the cholesterol drug evacetrapib was discontinued early after a preliminary analysis showed it did not reduce rates of major adverse cardiovascular events, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Study: Age and gender affects prevalence of certain peripheral vascular diseases

Study: Age and gender affects prevalence of certain peripheral vascular diseases

New findings from large-scale studies of more than 3.6 million people who underwent screening for cardiovascular disease reveals that a person's age and gender affects the prevalence of certain types of peripheral vascular diseases (PVD), and that diabetes is a major risk factor for developing these diseases, even in patients without heart disease. [More]
Higher aortic stiffness associated with reduced white matter volume among young adults

Higher aortic stiffness associated with reduced white matter volume among young adults

A large, multi-center study led by the UC Davis School of Medicine for the first time has shown that people as young as their 40s have stiffening of the arteries that is associated with subtle structural damage to the brain that is implicated in cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease later in life. [More]
Research shows women have more risk factors for heart disease

Research shows women have more risk factors for heart disease

Despite messages to the contrary, most women being seen by a doctor for the first time with suspected heart disease actually experience the same classic symptoms as men, notably chest pain and shortness of breath, according to a study led by the Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
Researchers find major gap in treatment for AF patients at higher risk for stroke

Researchers find major gap in treatment for AF patients at higher risk for stroke

Nearly half of all atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at the highest risk for stroke are not being prescribed blood thinners by their cardiologists, according to a new study by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco. [More]
Effective ways to ensure a long, healthy life

Effective ways to ensure a long, healthy life

More people may be living to 100 and beyond than ever before, but the real challenge is how to become one of them yourself, and how to care for an aging population. [More]
Specific gene mutation may significantly reduce risk of heart attack

Specific gene mutation may significantly reduce risk of heart attack

People with a specific gene mutation have a 50 percent lower risk of suffering a heart attack. This is what an international team of researchers headed by the cardiologist Prof. Heribert Schunkert, Medical Director of the German Heart Center at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), discovered in a broad comparative study. If this gene were switched off with medications it could reduce the risk of coronary disease significantly. [More]
Genetic errors may reduce heart attack risk, study finds

Genetic errors may reduce heart attack risk, study finds

To reduce risk of heart attack, the benefits of a healthy lifestyle are clear. But genetics can still stack the deck. Some people's genes bestow a natural advantage — or disadvantage — in protecting against heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. [More]
Common blood test could help predict risk of second stroke

Common blood test could help predict risk of second stroke

A new discovery about ischemic stroke may allow to doctors to predict a patient's risk of having a second stroke using a commonly performed blood test and their genetic profile. [More]
Heart attack patients experiencing cardiogenic shock at higher risk of death in first 60 days post-discharge

Heart attack patients experiencing cardiogenic shock at higher risk of death in first 60 days post-discharge

Heart attack patients who experience cardiogenic shock have a higher risk of death or rehospitalization than non-shock patients in the first 60 days post-discharge, but by the end of the first year, the gap between the two groups narrows, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Ultrasound-activated microbubbles help preserve healthy heart tissue

Ultrasound-activated microbubbles help preserve healthy heart tissue

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering used ultrasound-activated microbubbles to improve preservation of heart muscle and function in a pig heart attack model. [More]
University of Louisville researcher reveals potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes

University of Louisville researcher reveals potentially harmful effects of e-cigarettes

While e-cigarette use is increasing worldwide, little is known about the health effects e-cigarettes pose for users. A University of Louisville researcher is working to change that status. [More]
New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

New technique could help detect harmful PAMP molecules in certain processed foods

Our favourite foods could be made healthier thanks to a new technique developed by the University of Leicester which has identified harmful bacterial molecules in certain processed foods such as burgers and ready meals. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

New blood clotting analysis system could help determine effects antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs

A new blood clotting analysis system designed in Japan makes it easier to determine the effects of taking one or more antithrombotic (anti-clotting) drugs. [More]
Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Contrary to current clinical belief, regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats, which, while common, can lead in rare cases to heart- or stroke-related morbidity and mortality, according to UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Patients who receive information about coronary artery disease risk make improvements to health behaviors

Patients who receive information about coronary artery disease risk make improvements to health behaviors

A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital has found that providing unanticipated information about risk of coronary artery disease during a genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer's disease helped some participants cope with their results, and also motivated participants to make changes to their health behaviors. [More]
New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

New classification of coronary congenital diseases helps surgeons identify secondary defects

A new classification of coronary congenital diseases is set to help surgeons identify secondary defects in the operating theatre. The scheme is outlined in a novel European Society of Cardiology position paper published today in Cardiovascular Research.1 Clinical cardiologists will also know what to look for on cardiovascular images. [More]
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