Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
Patients with multiple narrowed arteries have better outcomes with CABG than with PCI

Patients with multiple narrowed arteries have better outcomes with CABG than with PCI

Despite the advent of a new generation of stents, patients with multiple narrowed arteries in the heart who received coronary artery bypass grafting fared better than those whose arteries were opened with balloon angioplasty and stents in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
CT coronary angiography can accurately diagnose coronary artery disease

CT coronary angiography can accurately diagnose coronary artery disease

Use of computed tomography coronary angiography, which provides 3-D images of the heart, coupled with standard care allows doctors to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in patients presenting with chest pain, therefore, leading to more appropriate follow-up testing and treatments, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Implantable defibrillators help patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy live longer

Implantable defibrillators help patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy live longer

Newly published research led by the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation and Tufts Medical Center in Boston shows that implantable defibrillators (ICDs), along with other modern treatments, have reduced mortality rates and are helping patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) live longer, including normal life expectancy. [More]
Screening for and treating depression could help reduce risk of heart disease

Screening for and treating depression could help reduce risk of heart disease

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute has found that screening for and treating depression could help to reduce the risk of heart disease in patients with moderate to severe depression. [More]
RBFox2 protein plays critical role in heart failure

RBFox2 protein plays critical role in heart failure

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a key piece in the complex molecular puzzle underlying heart failure - a serious and sometimes life-threatening disorder affecting more than 5 million Americans. [More]
Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in women often presents with different types of symptoms than in men and can be challenging to diagnose due to a variety of factors. A national panel of experts convened to review the latest evidence regarding CAD in women, diagnostic approaches, and new types of tests and technologies. [More]
CryoLife's revenues increase 5% to $37.2M in fourth quarter 2014

CryoLife's revenues increase 5% to $37.2M in fourth quarter 2014

CryoLife, Inc., a leading medical device and tissue processing company focused on cardiac and vascular surgery, announced today its results for the fourth quarter and full year of 2014. [More]
February is American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month, the perfect time to be reminded to take care of your heart. "Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women," says Gerald Sotsky, M.D., Chair of Cardiac Services, Valley Medical Group. [More]
Women’s risk factors for heart disease

Women’s risk factors for heart disease

Heart disease is often thought of as a health problem for men, but more and more women die of heart disease each year than men, and from any other disease including breast cancer. [More]
Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Study finds no evidence that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review published in this month's Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration panel convened last fall. [More]
Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

Study: Poor psychosocial work environment linked to cardiovascular problems

A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. [More]
Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Saskatoon, Canada, led by Dr. Joseph Fomusi Ndisang have determined that upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin improves pericardial adipocyte morphology and function. [More]
UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

Medical tests are stressful. Invasive tests, stress tests and unnecessary surgeries are too, not to mention the costs associated with all of them, but the alternative of undiagnosed heart problems are not. They can be fatal. [More]
Male stroke patients who live alone are at greater risk of premature death

Male stroke patients who live alone are at greater risk of premature death

Men who live alone have a considerably greater long-term risk of dying prematurely than other patients. This is shown in a doctoral thesis that followed 1,090 stroke cases in western Sweden. [More]
Diabetic patients with mild coronary artery disease face increased risk for heart attack

Diabetic patients with mild coronary artery disease face increased risk for heart attack

According to a new long-term study, diabetic patients with even mild coronary artery disease face the same relative risk for a heart attack or other major adverse heart events as diabetics with serious single-vessel obstructive disease. [More]
FDA issues Complete Response letter for Avanir’s AVP-825 NDA

FDA issues Complete Response letter for Avanir’s AVP-825 NDA

Avanir Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a Complete Response letter to its New Drug Application (NDA) for AVP-825. [More]
VeraVia releases information to help men achieve better weight loss strategy

VeraVia releases information to help men achieve better weight loss strategy

A recent study published in the British Journal of General Practice found that physicians have difficulty visually diagnosing obesity in men. San Diego fitness retreat VeraVia has released information for men to help them understand how their own weight loss differs from women. VeraVia founder and CEO Wyatt Chapman says, "Achieving the best weight loss strategy for your body and lifestyle can be complicated. [More]
Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Fatigue, increased irritability, and feeling demoralized, may raise a healthy man or woman's risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36 percent, according to a study led by researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals presented on Nov. 17 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]
Avanir Pharmaceuticals to publish AVP-825 phase III study results in the journal 'Headache'

Avanir Pharmaceuticals to publish AVP-825 phase III study results in the journal 'Headache'

Avanir Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the publication of results from TARGET, a pivotal phase III study evaluating the efficacy and safety of AVP-825 22mg in the January 2015 issue of Headache (Early access is now available). [More]
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