Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
CD34+ cell therapy improves angina frequency in no option patients with class III/IV angina refractory

CD34+ cell therapy improves angina frequency in no option patients with class III/IV angina refractory

A two-year, multi-center clinical study with 167 patients with class III-IV refractory angina randomized to low and high dose CD34+ cells or placebo has revealed that patients who received either a high or low dose of CD34 -- a member of a family of proteins that have an impact on vascular-associated tissue -- cells had a significant reduction in angina frequency over patients who received placebo. [More]
Women less likely to receive good anticoagulant therapy for AF-related stroke, say researchers

Women less likely to receive good anticoagulant therapy for AF-related stroke, say researchers

Female atrial fibrillation patients are less likely than their male counterparts to receive blood thinning therapies to prevent stroke, say University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers. [More]
ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

ART alone not sufficient to reduce arterial inflammation among HIV-infected patients, study finds

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

A new study from a group of international researchers has identified a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity—aerobic exercise. [More]
Novel protective gene against CAD uncovered

Novel protective gene against CAD uncovered

A large study has found that mutations in the gene encoding the major subunit of the asialoglycoprotein receptor are protective against coronary artery disease. [More]
OSA patients may have 1.57 times more MACCE risk afer unplanned revascularization

OSA patients may have 1.57 times more MACCE risk afer unplanned revascularization

In an ongoing prospective study involving 1,311 patients from five nations, researchers found that untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was associated with increased risk of a Major Adverse Cardiac and Cerebrovascular Event (MACCE) -- cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (heart attack), non-fatal stroke, and unplanned revascularization such as heart bypass surgery and angioplasty. [More]
New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

Drowning is a global threat to human health. Each year, more than 372,000 people die as a result of drowning, with many of those deaths being preventable by simple water safety measures. In order to arm professionals with the most up-to-date clinical protocols, the Wilderness Medical Society has issued a new set of practice guidelines for both the treatment and prevention of drowning, published in the society's official journal, Wilderness and Environmental Medicine. [More]
Study shows women undergoing TAVR have longer-term survival rate compared to men

Study shows women undergoing TAVR have longer-term survival rate compared to men

Data from one of the largest national registries of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients shows that although women are more likely to experience vascular complications in the hospital, their one-year survival rate is more favorable than men. [More]
Study finds no gender-based differences on use of anticoagulation medications in TAVR patients

Study finds no gender-based differences on use of anticoagulation medications in TAVR patients

A study on the impact of using different anticoagulation medications on men and women who have undergone a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) found no difference in early vascular complications or mortality. [More]
Study identifies sex differences in statin therapy among coronary artery disease patients

Study identifies sex differences in statin therapy among coronary artery disease patients

Statins are equally effective at decreasing risk of coronary events in men and women, and yet women are less likely to be prescribed these cholesterol-lowering drugs than men. [More]
Mediterranean diet reduces risk of recurrent heart attacks or strokes

Mediterranean diet reduces risk of recurrent heart attacks or strokes

A "Mediterranean" diet, high in fruit, vegetables, fish and unrefined foods, is linked to a lower risk of heart attack and stroke in people who already have heart disease, according to a study of over 15,000 people in 39 countries around the world. The research also showed that eating greater amounts of healthy food was more important for these people than avoiding unhealthy foods, such as refined grains, sweets, desserts, sugared drinks and deep-fried food - a "Western" diet. [More]
Wellderly study finds link between cognitive decline genes and healthy aging

Wellderly study finds link between cognitive decline genes and healthy aging

An eight-year-long accrual and analysis of the whole genome sequences of healthy elderly people, or "Wellderly," has revealed a higher-than-normal presence of genetic variants offering protection from cognitive decline, researchers from the Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) reported today in the journal Cell. [More]
Bosutinib shows 'low' vascular, cardiac event risk profile

Bosutinib shows 'low' vascular, cardiac event risk profile

Third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor study findings suggest that bosutinib is associated with a low risk of vascular and cardiac events in patients undergoing first-line or subsequent treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Clinical study shows association between Corus CAD blood test scores and cardiovascular event rates

Clinical study shows association between Corus CAD blood test scores and cardiovascular event rates

CardioDx, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company specializing in cardiovascular genomics, announced today results from a genomic substudy of the NHLBI-funded Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain (PROMISE) trial in nondiabetic patients receiving the Corus CAD blood test. [More]
Researchers identify possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease

Researchers identify possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease

For many people, coronary artery disease, or CAD—the buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries—is an unfortunate part of aging. By studying the genetic makeup of those who manage to maintain clear arteries into old age, researchers have identified a possible genetic basis for the disease, as well as potential new opportunities to prevent it. [More]
Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Paramedics often give heart rhythm stabilizing drugs to patients who are suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when they fail to regain a stable heart rhythm after electrical shock treatment. [More]
Two common approaches to post-operative AF equally safe, effective

Two common approaches to post-operative AF equally safe, effective

Cleveland Clinic researchers, as part of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, have found that two common approaches to post-operative atrial fibrillation - rhythm control and rate control - are equally safe and effective. [More]
New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

New stem cell therapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

A new stem cell therapy significantly improved long-term health outcomes in patients with severe and end-stage heart failure in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

Investigational stem cell therapy improves outcomes in patients with severe heart failure

An investigational stem cell therapy derived from patients' own blood marrow significantly improved outcomes in patients with severe heart failure, according to a study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. [More]
Tests used for diagnosing heart disease appear to function differently for women and men

Tests used for diagnosing heart disease appear to function differently for women and men

Tests used to diagnose and assess the severity of coronary artery disease appear to function differently for women and men who have stable symptoms, according to researchers from Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
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