Coronary Artery Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Artery Disease News and Research

Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death worldwide. It occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked by a buildup of "plaque" - cholesterol or other fatty deposits that build on the inner wall of the artery. Over time, this plaque build up results in a reduction of blood flow to the heart, which can cause chest pain. If the artery becomes completely blocked, usually by a blood clot, oxygen is prevented from reaching the heart which can result in a heart attack and/or damage to the heart tissue.
New blood test detects specific genes activated in individuals with obstructive CAD

New blood test detects specific genes activated in individuals with obstructive CAD

Nearly $7 billion is spent each year in the U.S. on diagnostic testing of the estimated three million people with symptoms of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). [More]

Regado receives Fast Track designation from FDA for REG1

Regado Biosciences, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of actively controllable therapeutics, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration has designated REG1 for anticoagulant therapy to be used in patients with coronary artery disease during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) as a Fast Track development program. [More]
Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics, Inc. today announced fourth quarter and full-year 2013 financial results. For the three months ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net income was $24.0 million, or $1.10 per share, compared to net loss of $10.8 million, or $0.51 per share for the same period in 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net loss was $35.5 million, or $1.66 per share, compared to $39.4 million, or $1.88 per share for the same period in 2012. [More]

EU study analyzes effectiveness of cardiac computed tomography

Scientists from 28 research facilities in 20 European countries are meeting today in Berlin to kick off the collaborative research project DISCHARGE. The purpose of this project is to determine for which patients with chest pain cardiac CT or cardiac catheterization is best suited. [More]
Loving relationship is good for heart, says cardiologist

Loving relationship is good for heart, says cardiologist

With Valentine's Day just one day away, Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute cardiologist Julie Damp, M.D., says being involved in a healthy, loving relationship is good for the heart. [More]
Tryton Medical received CE Mark for treatment of Left Main Coronary artery disease

Tryton Medical received CE Mark for treatment of Left Main Coronary artery disease

Tryton Medical, Inc., the leading developer of stents designed to treat bifurcation lesions, announced that it has received CE Mark for the treatment of Left Main Coronary artery disease. With this approval, Tryton Medical becomes the first company to earn a CE Mark for this indication. [More]
Bosch Healthcare receives NCQA's Disease Management certification for HMPs

Bosch Healthcare receives NCQA's Disease Management certification for HMPs

Robert Bosch Healthcare Systems, Inc., the market leader in evidence-based telehealth solutions, today announced the that it has received certification for program design in Disease Management for 16 Health Management Programs (HMPs) that it submitted to the National Committee for Quality Assurance. [More]

TV series House helps doctors diagnose Cobalt intoxication of patient with hip replacement

In today’s edition of The Lancet [Friday 7 February], doctors report the case of a patient with severe heart failure, who in May 2012 was referred to the Marburg University clinic in Germany. [More]
Study reports that smoking causes earlier signs of menopause

Study reports that smoking causes earlier signs of menopause

New research is lighting up yet another reason for women to quit smoking. In a study published online in the journal Menopause, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report the first evidence showing that smoking causes earlier signs of menopause - in the case of heavy smokers, up to nine years earlier than average - in white women with certain genetic variations. [More]

Researchers make first link between menopause, smoking and genetic variations in white women

New research is lighting up yet another reason for women to quit smoking. In a study published online in the journal Menopause, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report the first evidence showing that smoking causes earlier signs of menopause - in the case of heavy smokers, up to nine years earlier than average - in white women with certain genetic variations. [More]
Sanford Hospital starts clinical trial to study dissolving device in patients with CAD

Sanford Hospital starts clinical trial to study dissolving device in patients with CAD

Sanford Heart Hospital has started a clinical trial to study a dissolving device in patients with coronary artery disease. The ABSORB III clinical trial will investigate the safety and effectiveness of the Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS) device, manufactured by global health care company Abbott. [More]

Prediction models can be useful for heart team to determine best treatment strategy

Detailed prediction models that project long-term patient mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery can be useful for the heart team when determining the best treatment strategy for individual patients, according to a study in the February 2014 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]

Heart transplantation continues to be "gold standard" treatment for end-stage heart failure

Heart transplantation continues to be the "gold standard" treatment for end-stage heart failure, and a large number of patients now live 20 years or more after surgery, according to a study in the February 2014 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Aspirin prescribed more often for stroke prevention in AF despite of dangerous side effects

Aspirin prescribed more often for stroke prevention in AF despite of dangerous side effects

Aspirin is still overprescribed for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) despite the potential for dangerous side effects, according to research published today. [More]

Children who undergo heart transplantation experience good outcomes

Infants and children who undergo heart transplantation are experiencing good outcomes after surgery and may expect to live beyond 15 years post-surgery with reasonable cardiac function and quality of life, according to a study released today at the 50th Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. [More]
Cleveland Clinic: Process that turns HDL cholesterol bad discovered

Cleveland Clinic: Process that turns HDL cholesterol bad discovered

Cleveland Clinic researchers have discovered the process by which high-density lipoprotein (HDL) - the so-called "good cholesterol" - becomes dysfunctional, loses its cardio-protective properties, and instead promotes inflammation and atherosclerosis, or the clogging and hardening of the arteries. [More]
Morbidity following liver transplant is highest among obese patients with diabetes

Morbidity following liver transplant is highest among obese patients with diabetes

Researchers from New Zealand report that morbidity following liver transplant is highest among obese patients with diabetes, but these risk factors do not influence post-transplant survival. [More]

New easy-to-use risk calculator helps predict heart failure patients' chances of survival

A UCLA team has developed an easy-to-use "risk calculator" that helps predict heart failure patients' chances of survival for up to five years and assists doctors in determining whether more or less aggressive treatment is appropriate. [More]
Clinical rule stratifies CAP patients’ cardiac risk

Clinical rule stratifies CAP patients’ cardiac risk

Researchers have generated and validated a clinical rule that accurately stratifies patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia according to their risk for cardiac complications. [More]

First commercial implant of Elixir's DESolve Novolimus Eluting Coronary Scaffold performed in Germany

Marking a milestone in the evolution of fully-bioresorbable drug-eluting scaffolds for interventional cardiology, the first commercial implant of Elixir Medical's CE Mark-approved DESolve Novolimus Eluting Coronary Scaffold was performed in Germany by Professor Dr. med. Holger Nef, Head of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, University Hospital Giessen, Giessen, Germany. [More]