Coronary Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Coronary Disease News and Research

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]

Lower levels of vitamin D predict extent of coronary artery disease

Vitamin D deficiency is an independent risk factor for heart disease with lower levels of vitamin D being associated with a higher presence and severity of coronary artery disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Researchers analyze existing cohort studies and randomized trials on coronary risk and fatty acid intake

Researchers analyze existing cohort studies and randomized trials on coronary risk and fatty acid intake

A new study raises questions about current guidelines which generally restrict the consumption of saturated fats and encourage consumption of polyunsaturated fats to prevent heart disease. The research was published today, 18 March, in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
CSI's new Diamondback Peripheral 60cm systems receive FDA clearance for PAD treatment

CSI's new Diamondback Peripheral 60cm systems receive FDA clearance for PAD treatment

Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., announced today it has received FDA clearance of its new Diamondback 360 60cm Peripheral Orbital Atherectomy Systems (OAS) for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). [More]

Researchers evaluate trends in cause-specific long-term mortality post PCI

More people who have known coronary heart disease die from other causes — such as cancer, and lung and neurological diseases — than heart disease, compared with 20 years ago, according to a Mayo Clinic study published online today in Circulation, an American Heart Association journal. [More]
Patients who experience abrupt kidney injury following surgery have increased risk of heart problems

Patients who experience abrupt kidney injury following surgery have increased risk of heart problems

Patients who experience abrupt kidney injury following surgery have an increased risk of later developing heart problems, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). [More]

ESC presents results of pilot registry on management and treatment of AF in Europe

Results for a pilot registry on the management and treatment of atrial fibrillation in Europe were presented yesterday by the European Society of Cardiology. AF is the commonest cardiac rhythm disorder and each of us have a one-in-four lifetime risk of developing it. Statistics show that oral anticoagulant use has increased, but new oral anticoagulant use is still low. Authors also concluded that compliance with treatment guidelines for patients with the lowest and higher stroke risk scores remains suboptimal. [More]
U.S. physicians use CSI's Diamondback 360 Coronary OAS for coronary artery disease treatment

U.S. physicians use CSI's Diamondback 360 Coronary OAS for coronary artery disease treatment

Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., today announced that its new Diamondback 360 Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System is being used by physicians across the country to treat coronary artery disease. This follows the company's recent PMA approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market the device as a treatment for severely calcified coronary arteries. [More]
Study finds patients treated with varespladib drug more likely to experience cardiovascular events

Study finds patients treated with varespladib drug more likely to experience cardiovascular events

Patients with acute coronary syndrome who were treated with the experimental drug varespladib were more likely to experience additional cardiovascular events - including sudden death, heart attack and stroke - than those treated with placebo, according to research from the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research (C5Research). [More]

New method for quickly ruling out serious acute coronary disease of chest pains

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have tested a new method for quickly ruling out acute myocardial infarction or other serious acute coronary disease in Emergency department patients complaining of chest pains. [More]
CSI receives PMA approval to market Diamondback 360 Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System

CSI receives PMA approval to market Diamondback 360 Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System

Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., today announced that it has received PMA approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market its Diamondback 360® Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) as a treatment for severely calcified coronary arteries. [More]
Experimental agent fails to increase HDL levels, reveals new study

Experimental agent fails to increase HDL levels, reveals new study

The search continues for an agent that increases high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and reduces arterial plaque, after the experimental apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) inducer, RVX-208 failed to do so in the ApoA1 Synthesis Stimulation and Intravascular Ultrasound for Coronary Atheroma Regression Evaluation (ASSURE) study. [More]

RVX-208 drug fails to increase good cholesterol levels in ASSURE trial

Patients with coronary artery disease and low levels of "good cholesterol - or high-density lipoprotein - who were treated with a drug designed to increase HDL levels and reduce coronary plaque build-up, experienced no better results than those treated with placebo, according to research conducted by the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research. [More]

Aliskiren does not slow progression of coronary atherosclerosis in prehypertension patients

Among patients with prehypertension and coronary artery disease, use of the renin (an enzyme secreted by the kidneys) inhibitor aliskiren, compared with placebo, did not result in improvement or slowing in the progression of coronary atherosclerosis, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2013. [More]
Study: Fixed-dose combination medication helps CVD patients

Study: Fixed-dose combination medication helps CVD patients

In a randomized trial that included about 2,000 patients with or at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), use of a fixed-dose combination medication for blood pressure, cholesterol, and platelet control compared to usual care resulted in significantly improved medication adherence after 15 months and small improvements in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, according to a study in the September 4 issue of JAMA. [More]

AQUARIUS trial data shows Aliskiren reduced incidents of death, stroke, heart attack

Patients with clogged and hardened arteries who already have their blood pressure under control may benefit from an additional blood pressure-lowering medication, according to research from the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research (C5Research). [More]

Renin inhibitor aliskiren not effective in slowing progression of coronary atherosclerosis

Among patients with prehypertension and coronary artery disease, use of the renin (an enzyme secreted by the kidneys) inhibitor aliskiren, compared with placebo, did not result in improvement or slowing in the progression of coronary atherosclerosis, according to a study published by JAMA. [More]
Researchers outline recommendations to lower costs and lead to better care for patients

Researchers outline recommendations to lower costs and lead to better care for patients

Medical organizations are participating in a campaign to help clinicians and patients avoid wasteful and sometimes harmful medical interventions. Recently, experts in pediatric and adult health from diverse geographic locations of the United States and from a mix of academic and non- academic settings shared their experiences, consulted their colleagues, and analyzed numerous studies in the medical literature to determine the top recommendations for improving healthcare value. [More]
New effort could dramatically improve surgical outcomes in children, say surgeons

New effort could dramatically improve surgical outcomes in children, say surgeons

A group of pediatric surgeons at hospitals around the country have designed a system to collect and analyze data on surgical outcomes in children - the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) is the first national database able to reliably compare outcomes among different hospitals where children's surgery is performed. [More]
Many women die due to Cad, yet less likely to receive preventive recommendations

Many women die due to Cad, yet less likely to receive preventive recommendations

Despite coronary artery disease (CAD) killing at least as many women as men each year, women are still today less likely to receive preventive recommendations, such as lipid-lowering therapy, aspirin, and lifestyle advice, than are men at a similar risk level. [More]