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Study: High-cholesterol diet or eating eggs do not increase risk of cardiovascular diseases

Study: High-cholesterol diet or eating eggs do not increase risk of cardiovascular diseases

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease. Furthermore, no association was found among those with the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism and is common among the Finnish population. [More]
Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet containing unsaturated fats, such as those found in walnuts and olive oil, has similar weight loss effects as a lower fat, higher-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression and its symptoms increase as people age, and have been linked to heart disease and stroke in both middle-aged and older adults. But whether depression and its symptoms are risk factors for these two dangerous conditions has been unclear. [More]
Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

In a study of more than 1.3 million Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California that stretched over 10 years, researchers found that blacks, Latinos and Asians generally had lower risk of coronary heart disease compared to whites. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
Evolocumab drug offers no added benefit over appropriate comparator therapy

Evolocumab drug offers no added benefit over appropriate comparator therapy

Evolocumab (trade name: Repatha) has been approved since July 2015 for two therapeutic indications: on the one hand, for hypercholesterolaemia or mixed dyslipidaemia, and on the other, for homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. [More]
Small-vessel disease has uncertain impact on large-vessel stenosis outcomes

Small-vessel disease has uncertain impact on large-vessel stenosis outcomes

Research shows that small-vessel disease is common among patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, but that its effect on stroke risk cannot be separated from the effect of associated risk factors. [More]
Mind-body medicine can ward off more heart attacks compared to conventional prevention programs

Mind-body medicine can ward off more heart attacks compared to conventional prevention programs

Mind-body medicine (MBM) is a holistic approach that has the potential to ward off more heart attacks than conventional prevention programs. That is the conclusion reached by Holger Cramer and colleagues in a systematic review and meta-analysis presented in the latest issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015; 112: 759-67). [More]
Urine-derived iPSCs model could help predict patient response to cholesterol-lowering drugs

Urine-derived iPSCs model could help predict patient response to cholesterol-lowering drugs

We all know how important it is to keep our levels of blood cholesterol - especially the 'bad' variety - in check with a healthy diet and regular exercise. Although cholesterol is a key structural component of cell membranes and is vital for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins, high levels can lead to the formation of arterial plaques, which are a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. [More]
Modest physical activity associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease in older adults

Modest physical activity associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease in older adults

In a large prospective community-based study of older Americans, modest physical activity was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This was true even among men and women older than age 75 at baseline - a rapidly growing population for whom regular activity has been advised, but with little supportive empirical evidence. [More]
Promising new treatment for sepsis on the horizon

Promising new treatment for sepsis on the horizon

A promising new drug for sepsis is on the horizon thanks to new funding from the British Heart Foundation, which could help take the laboratory discovery into the clinic. [More]
Disclosing genetic risk for CHD results in lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

Disclosing genetic risk for CHD results in lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

A group of researchers led by Mayo Clinic has discovered that disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) results in lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), also known as bad cholesterol. The findings of the Myocardial Infarction Genes (MI-GENES) Study were presented today at the annual American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2015 as a late-breaking clinical trial. [More]
Chronic pain sufferers may benefit from therapy to help them sleep better, study finds

Chronic pain sufferers may benefit from therapy to help them sleep better, study finds

Research conducted at the University of Warwick indicates that chronic pain sufferers could benefit from therapy to help them sleep better. [More]
Sleep apnea associated with evidence of early heart injury in women

Sleep apnea associated with evidence of early heart injury in women

Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the development of subsequent cardiovascular (CV) complications differ by sex, but it is not clear from prior research whether the effects of sleep apnea on heart disease is similar for men and women. [More]
Finnish researchers find that obesity surgery normalizes brain's opioid neurotransmission

Finnish researchers find that obesity surgery normalizes brain's opioid neurotransmission

Researchers at Aalto University and University of Turku have revealed how obesity surgery recovers opioid neurotransmission in the brain. [More]
People with restless legs syndrome at higher risk for stroke, heart and kidney disease

People with restless legs syndrome at higher risk for stroke, heart and kidney disease

Imagine trying to lie down and rest but feeling an uncontrollable urge to keep moving your legs. That, in a nutshell, is the ongoing ordeal facing people with restless legs syndrome. Considered a neurological, sleep, or movement disorder, RLS affects up to 1 in 10 people in the U.S. For those coping with a more severe form of RLS, countless sleepless nights--during which they may toss and turn constantly, or get up and pace the floor--can shatter quality of life. [More]
Positive emotions may make your heart healthier

Positive emotions may make your heart healthier

People with heart disease may benefit from maintaining positive emotions, according to health researchers. Over the course of five years the researchers tracked more than 1,000 patients with coronary heart disease. Patients who reported higher positive psychological states were more likely to be physically active, sleep better and take their heart medications and were also less likely to smoke, compared to patients with lower levels of positive states. [More]
Paradigm failure is primary reason for lack of progress in cancer research, says cancer biologist

Paradigm failure is primary reason for lack of progress in cancer research, says cancer biologist

A recent publication, which received sustained media attention, claimed that most cancers are just “bad luck”. Its authors stated that only about one-third of cancer mutations are caused by known lifestyle or environmental factors. [More]
Research shows more than 30,000 women die from cardiovascular disease in UK

Research shows more than 30,000 women die from cardiovascular disease in UK

More than 30,000 women die from coronary heart disease in the UK every year with over 700,000 women living with the consequences of heart disease and stroke, according to research published by The British Heart Foundation ahead of World Heart Day on 29th September. [More]
New study heightens concerns over detrimental impact of air pollution on gene associated with AD risk

New study heightens concerns over detrimental impact of air pollution on gene associated with AD risk

A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Valle de México, Boise State, and North Carolina, the Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, and Centro Médico Cozumel heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of air pollution on hippocampal metabolites as early markers of neurodegeneration in young urbanites carrying an allele 4 of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). [More]
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