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Sheffield scientists to showcase novel medical discoveries during International Clinical Trials Day

Sheffield scientists to showcase novel medical discoveries during International Clinical Trials Day

WORLD-leading researchers and scientists from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust and the University of Sheffield will be giving people in Sheffield and beyond a unique insight into how they can contribute to groundbreaking medical discoveries during International Clinical Trials Day (Wednesday 20 May 2015). [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamous marriage can increase heart disease risk in men by four times

Polygamy increases the risk of heart disease by more than 4-fold, reveals research presented at the Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology Congress 2015 (APSC 2015) by Dr Amin Daoulah, a cardiologist at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The risk and severity of heart disease increased with the number of wives. [More]
Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. [More]
EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

While death rates from heart disease in Europe have more than halved in many countries and in most population groups since the early 1980s, heart disease remains by far the leading cause of death. [More]
University of Birmingham researchers identify new way to tackle chronic diseases

University of Birmingham researchers identify new way to tackle chronic diseases

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have identified an important new way in which our immune systems are regulated, and hope that understanding it will help tackle the debilitating effects of type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and other serious diseases. [More]

Shorter individuals at greater risk of heart disease

In a study of more than 200,000 people with or without heart disease, researchers from the University of Leicester found that for every 2.5 inch decrease in a person’s height, the risk of coronary heart disease increased by 13.5%... [More]
Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

The shorter you are- the more your risk of coronary heart disease. That's the key finding of a new study led by the University of Leicester which discovered that every 2.5 inches change in your height affected your risk of coronary heart disease by 13.5%. For example, compared to a 5ft 6inch tall person, a 5 foot tall person on average has a 32% higher risk of coronary heart disease because of their relatively shorter stature. [More]
China Pharma's revenue decreases 24% to $24.9 million in fiscal year 2014

China Pharma's revenue decreases 24% to $24.9 million in fiscal year 2014

China Pharma Holdings, Inc., an NYSE MKT listed corporation with its fully-integrated specialty pharmaceuticals subsidiary based in China, today announced financial results for the year ended December 31, 2014. [More]
Study: Adding peanuts to a high fat meal improves vascular function

Study: Adding peanuts to a high fat meal improves vascular function

A study of peanut consumption showed that including them as a part of a high fat meal improved the post-meal triglyceride response and preserved endothelial function. [More]
Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen seeks marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) in Japan for treatment of high cholesterol

Amgen today announced that an application seeking marketing approval of Repatha (evolocumab) for the treatment of high cholesterol has been submitted for review to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan. [More]
Cardiac PET/CT imaging offers higher accuracy, better image quality than SPECT imaging

Cardiac PET/CT imaging offers higher accuracy, better image quality than SPECT imaging

New heart imaging technology to diagnose coronary heart disease and other heart disorders is significantly more accurate, less expensive and safer than traditional methods, according to a new study by researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. [More]
Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing the minimum age of legal access (MLA) to tobacco products will prevent or delay initiation of tobacco use by adolescents and young adults, particularly those ages 15 to 17, and improve the health of Americans across the lifespan, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. [More]
Study highlights how obesity is linked to brain-level molecular changes

Study highlights how obesity is linked to brain-level molecular changes

Researchers at Aalto University and University of Turku have revealed how obesity is associated with altered opioid neurotransmission in the brain. [More]
New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

New study shows who benefits most from statin therapy

Research has demonstrated that the risk for developing coronary heart disease depends on a host of risk factors that are related both to lifestyle and genetics. In a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers tested whether a composite of genetic variants could identify the risk of cardiovascular death and heart attacks as well as identify individuals who derived greater clinical benefit from statin therapy. [More]
Ninety percent of patients at risk of CHD fail to receive statins

Ninety percent of patients at risk of CHD fail to receive statins

The study, published in Current Medical Research and Opinion, provides the first ever real-world view of the treatment landscape for patients at risk of CHD[1], with a sample of two million patients. But the results paint a bleak picture of prescribing patterns with the majority not being given the potentially life saving drug. [More]
Single-step fermentative method may facilitate industrial-scale statin drug production

Single-step fermentative method may facilitate industrial-scale statin drug production

University of Manchester researchers, together with industrial partner DSM, have developed a single-step fermentative method for the production of leading cholesterol-lowering drug, pravastatin, which will facilitate industrial-scale statin drug production. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Vanderbilt's Stacey Kendrick suggests nine simple steps for healthier heart

Vanderbilt's Stacey Kendrick suggests nine simple steps for healthier heart

In observance of Heart Month in February, Vanderbilt health educator Stacey Kendrick has compiled a list of steps everyone can take for a healthier heart. [More]
Blood pressure-lowering treatment lowers CVD, heart disease risks among type 2 diabetes patients

Blood pressure-lowering treatment lowers CVD, heart disease risks among type 2 diabetes patients

Blood pressure-lowering treatment among patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and heart disease events and improved mortality, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
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