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Presence of certain proteins in HDL can lead to cardiovascular risk

Presence of certain proteins in HDL can lead to cardiovascular risk

A current study by the MedUni Vienna has shown that changes to the "good cholesterol" HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein) can be associated with cardiovascular diseases: by developing a new laboratory test, scientists at the Institute of Medical Genetics and the Department of Nephrology & Dialysis (University Department of Internal Medicine III) at the MedUni Vienna have demonstrated for the first time that the presence of certain proteins in the HDL can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. [More]
Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

It's known that cholesterol levels typically rise as people age and that high cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. What's less known is that cholesterol levels begin to decline the more a person ages. Recently, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the University of Kentucky found that differences in one gene can influence a person's cholesterol levels from midlife to late life. [More]
Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

The landmark discovery of a tiny defect in a vital heart protein has for the first time enabled heart specialists to accurately pinpoint a therapeutic target for future efforts in developing a drug-based cure for cardiovascular diseases. [More]
A single gene mutation can halve the risk of heart disease

A single gene mutation can halve the risk of heart disease

Recent research has shown that inactivation of a single gene reduces the risk of heart attack by 50%. [More]
Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare mutations that shut down a single gene are linked to lower cholesterol levels and a 50 percent reduction in the risk of heart attack, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Broad Institute at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, and other institutions. [More]
FDA accepts Amgen's evolocumab BLA for review

FDA accepts Amgen's evolocumab BLA for review

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for review Amgen's Biologics License Application (BLA) for evolocumab for the treatment of high cholesterol. [More]
Moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease, but only for some people

Moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease, but only for some people

A new study at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, confirms that moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease. [More]
Oats play important role in human health

Oats play important role in human health

According to a new, wide-reaching collection of scientific reviews published in the October 2014 supplement issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, oats may play an important role in improving satiety, diet quality and digestive, cardiovascular and general metabolic health. [More]
Study: Certain prostate cancer medications linked to cardiac death risk

Study: Certain prostate cancer medications linked to cardiac death risk

A new study has found that certain prostate cancer medications are linked with an increased risk of dying from heart-related causes in men with congestive heart failure or prior heart attacks. Published in BJU International, the findings will help doctors and patients weigh the benefits and risks of the drugs. [More]
Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

People who swap 5% of the calories they consume from saturated fat sources such as red meat and butter with foods containing linoleic acid—the main polyunsaturated fat found in vegetable oil, nuts, and seeds—lowered their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events by 9% and their risk of death from CHD by 13%, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

Vascular receptor autoantibodies implicated in SSc-PAH

medwireNews: Autoantibodies to endothelin receptor type A and angiotensin receptor type-1 predict the development of, and mortality from, systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, research suggests. [More]
Overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging increases healthcare costs

Overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging increases healthcare costs

In a new study recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center concluded that overuse of cardiac stress testing with imaging has led to rising healthcare costs and unnecessary radiation exposure to patients. [More]
Study: Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary heart disease risk

Study: Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary heart disease risk

A recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland shows that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. The sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids include fish, vegetable oils, and nuts. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Milk consumption and dairy may lower blood pressure, CVD risk

Milk consumption and dairy may lower blood pressure, CVD risk

Globally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) claims 17 million lives each year, while complications from high blood pressure take an additional 9.4 million. New research presented by international scientists at the 12th Euro Fed Lipid Congress in Montpellier, France on September 15, 2014, suggests that milk consumption and dairy may play a beneficial role. [More]
Darapladib drug fails to reduce risk of recurrent major coronary events

Darapladib drug fails to reduce risk of recurrent major coronary events

In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event (such as heart attack or unstable angina), use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis) did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA. [More]
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

Sudden unexpected death (SUD) results from a malfunction of the heart and causes a rapid loss of blood flow through the body, leading to death. It is a very rapid process and may have few or no known warning signs. The overall survival rate for out-of-hospital arrest is only 5-10%. SUD is responsible for upwards of 450,000 people in the United States each year, with North Carolina experiencing an average of 32 SUD-related deaths each day. [More]
Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen today announced the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for evolocumab seeking approval for the treatment of high cholesterol. [More]
People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt than those from higher socio-economic positions, irrespective of where they live. [More]