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Darapladib drug fails to reduce risk of recurrent major coronary events

Darapladib drug fails to reduce risk of recurrent major coronary events

In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event (such as heart attack or unstable angina), use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis) did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA. [More]
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

Sudden unexpected death (SUD) results from a malfunction of the heart and causes a rapid loss of blood flow through the body, leading to death. It is a very rapid process and may have few or no known warning signs. The overall survival rate for out-of-hospital arrest is only 5-10%. SUD is responsible for upwards of 450,000 people in the United States each year, with North Carolina experiencing an average of 32 SUD-related deaths each day. [More]
Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen seeks FDA approval for evolocumab to treat patients with high cholesterol

Amgen today announced the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for evolocumab seeking approval for the treatment of high cholesterol. [More]
People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt than those from higher socio-economic positions, irrespective of where they live. [More]
Calcium buildup in coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients indicates heart disease risk

Calcium buildup in coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients indicates heart disease risk

Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients may be a strong indicator of heart disease risk, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). [More]
Meta-analysis shows blood pressure variability and mortality link

Meta-analysis shows blood pressure variability and mortality link

A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies investigating the link between visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality has revealed a modest, but significant, association. [More]
Teachers help kids to reduce childhood obesity

Teachers help kids to reduce childhood obesity

An innovative physical activities guide developed at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) is helping North Carolina fight childhood obesity. [More]
Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

The Annals of Family Medicine today published an article detailing research showing that women with a history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later in adulthood than other women, work completed by physicians in the Center for Primary Care and Prevention (CPCP) at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island. [More]
Study finds nutritional and safety benefits from consumption of organic food

Study finds nutritional and safety benefits from consumption of organic food

The largest study of its kind has found that organic foods and crops have a suite of advantages over their conventional counterparts, including more antioxidants and fewer, less frequent pesticide residues. [More]
Reduction in alcohol consumption beneficial for cardiovascular health

Reduction in alcohol consumption beneficial for cardiovascular health

A reduction in alcohol consumption, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, could be linked to improved cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index and blood pressure, according to new research published in The BMJ. [More]
Reducing amount of alcoholic beverages consumed may improve cardiovascular health

Reducing amount of alcoholic beverages consumed may improve cardiovascular health

Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may improve cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure, according to a new multi-center study published in The BMJ and co-led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Findings shed light on possible role of affective temperaments in cardiovascular morbidity

Findings shed light on possible role of affective temperaments in cardiovascular morbidity

Temperament has been traditionally associated with high blood pressure. A new study that has appeared in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics has substantiated this issue. [More]
Study finds little progress in reducing disparities among people with disabilities

Study finds little progress in reducing disparities among people with disabilities

Psychological distress in people with disabilities is associated with increased prevalence of other chronic conditions and reduced access to health care and preventive care services, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. [More]
Fatty acids in nuts help reduce risk of CHD in people with type 2 diabetes

Fatty acids in nuts help reduce risk of CHD in people with type 2 diabetes

Findings from a new study published in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases show that the fatty acids in nuts have the potential to help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
RYGB surgery can help reduce heart disease risk in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes

RYGB surgery can help reduce heart disease risk in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes

Obese patients with Type 2 diabetes who don't have excessive surgical risk may find that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery can help them reduce their risk of heart disease, a new clinical trial shows. [More]
Lowering systolic blood pressure below 120 does not appear to provide additional benefit

Lowering systolic blood pressure below 120 does not appear to provide additional benefit

For decades, common medical wisdom has been "the lower the better" in treating the approximately one in three people in this country who have high blood pressure. [More]
High CHD risk in diabetic women confirmed

High CHD risk in diabetic women confirmed

A meta-analysis confirms that the excess risk for coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes is greater in women than men. [More]
Cerenis’ SAMBA and MODE Phase II Studies Meet Primary Endpoints for Treatment of FPHA, HoFH

Cerenis’ SAMBA and MODE Phase II Studies Meet Primary Endpoints for Treatment of FPHA, HoFH

Cerenis Therapeutics, the biopharmaceutical company, today announced that two of its Phase II studies, SAMBA and MODE (Modifying Orphan Disease Evaluation), with CER-001, an engineered human apoA-I-containing pre-β HDL mimetic, met their primary clinical endpoints in patients with Familial Primary Hypoalphalipoproteinemia (FPHA) and Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), respectively. [More]
Online and mobile apps designed for health and well-being are often short-lived

Online and mobile apps designed for health and well-being are often short-lived

According to a doctoral thesis by Research Scientist Kirsikka Kaipainen from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, online and mobile applications for stress management and healthy eating reach a large number of users but their appeal tends to be short-lived. [More]