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Study examines association between marijuana use and measures of lung health

Study examines association between marijuana use and measures of lung health

A research study based on analysis of publicly available data has found that recent marijuana use was associated with symptoms of airway inflammation, but that moderate lifetime use was not associated with clinically significant changes in measures of lung function. [More]
Pioneering research advances prevention of lung damage when providing mechanical ventilation

Pioneering research advances prevention of lung damage when providing mechanical ventilation

The Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry of the Universitat de València participates in a pioneering research to advance the prevention of lung damage when providing mechanical ventilation in operations that require general anaesthesia. [More]
AACN to present 2015 Circle of Excellence Awards to 25 nurses at NTI

AACN to present 2015 Circle of Excellence Awards to 25 nurses at NTI

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) will bestow the 2015 Circle of Excellence Award on 25 nurses nationwide at the National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition (NTI), San Diego, May 18-21. [More]
Clear and concise communication essential to quality patient care in ED

Clear and concise communication essential to quality patient care in ED

The high-risk, rapidly changing nature of hospital Emergency Departments creates an environment where stress levels and staff burnout rates are high, but researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have identified the secret sauce that helps many emergency clinicians flourish - communication. [More]
ICU patients using ventilators could benefit from assistive communication tools

ICU patients using ventilators could benefit from assistive communication tools

A new study reveals that more than half of patients in intensive care units (ICU) using ventilators to help them breathe could benefit from assistive communication tools. [More]
Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Nearly three-quarters of homeless adults with mental illness in Canada show evidence of cognitive deficits, such as difficulties with problem solving, learning and memory, new research has found. [More]
Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

Astute Medical, bioMérieux sign agreement to develop NephroCheck Test for acute kidney injury

bioMérieux, a world leader in the field of in vitro diagnostics, and Astute Medical, Inc., a company dedicated to improving the diagnosis of high-risk medical conditions and diseases through the identification and validation of protein biomarkers, today announced that they have signed a global, semi-exclusive agreement regarding the development of a test for the early risk assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI). [More]
Bathing critically ill patients with chlorhexidine wipes does not prevent ICU infections

Bathing critically ill patients with chlorhexidine wipes does not prevent ICU infections

Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have found that bathing critically ill patients with disposable chlorhexidine cloths did not decrease the incidence of health care-associated infections when compared to less expensive nonantimicrobial cloths, according to a study appearing online in JAMA this week. [More]
St. Mary's wins Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence for second consecutive year

St. Mary's wins Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence for second consecutive year

Dignity Health St. Mary's Medical Center has received the Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence™ from Healthgrades, the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. This is the second consecutive year St. Mary's has received this award, which recognizes St. Mary's as among the top five percent of more than 4,500 hospitals nationwide for clinical performance. [More]
Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn Medicine researchers, in a continuation of their groundbreaking work to better understand how anesthesia works in the body, have found the first new class of novel anesthetics since the 1970s. Their findings, published in February issue of Anesthesiology, detail the processes through which the group uncovered these compounds. [More]
Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Despite the variety of effective treatments, and physicians who specialize in treating pain, women often suffer unnecessarily from conditions ranging from backaches to pain after cancer surgery, and also treat their pain with medications that may be ineffective and possibly harmful, according to a review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers more likely to develop severe primary graft dysfunction

Patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers more likely to develop severe primary graft dysfunction

Lung transplant patients who receive lungs from heavy drinkers are nearly nine times more likely to experience a life-threatening complication called primary graft dysfunction, a Loyola University Medical Center study has found. [More]
Philips, MIT team up to allow health care researchers to tap into critical care patient data

Philips, MIT team up to allow health care researchers to tap into critical care patient data

Royal Philips today announced a new initiative with Massachusetts Institute of Technology to allow health care researchers to tap into one of the largest data sources available for research into critical care. [More]
Urinary levels of novel biomarkers linked to adverse long-term outcomes in AKI patients

Urinary levels of novel biomarkers linked to adverse long-term outcomes in AKI patients

High levels of two novel urinary biomarkers early in critical illness are associated with adverse long-term outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), according to an international, multi-center study led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Researchers. [More]
Mayo Clinic expert explains difference between severe sepsis and septic shock

Mayo Clinic expert explains difference between severe sepsis and septic shock

Sepsis can be a dangerous complication of almost any type of infection, including influenza, pneumonia and food poisoning; urinary tract infections; bloodstream infections from wounds; and abdominal infections. [More]
ASA offers tips for safe surgery, anesthesia experience

ASA offers tips for safe surgery, anesthesia experience

Surgery and anesthesia are safer than ever, but most patients don't know about the steps they can and should take to make their experience safer and more comfortable. [More]

Sustained quality improvement changes in ICU benefits both patients and health care facility

In a pre- and post-evaluation study, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that quality improvement changes made in an intensive care unit (ICU) were still in practice five years later — benefiting both patients and the health care facility. Those changes included new protocols for treating critically ill patients by encouraging early physical therapy in the ICU. [More]
Better physical functioning associated with remission of general anxiety, PTSD symptoms

Better physical functioning associated with remission of general anxiety, PTSD symptoms

In a two-year longitudinal study involving 13 intensive care units in four U.S. hospitals, researchers found that better physical functioning — basic and complex activities considered essential for maintaining independence — is associated with remission of general anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. These findings may help clinicians be better prepared for caring for the growing number of survivors of critical illness, potentially leading to a better quality of recovery for patients. [More]
Outbreaks of infectious diseases offer lessons for critical care providers

Outbreaks of infectious diseases offer lessons for critical care providers

Outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as Ebola in West Africa, offer insight for how healthcare professionals can respond more effectively to current and future challenges, according to editors of the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
FDA receives IDE application for CytoSorbents' CytoSorb cardiac surgery trial

FDA receives IDE application for CytoSorbents' CytoSorb cardiac surgery trial

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company commercializing its CytoSorb® extracorporeal cytokine adsorber to reduce deadly inflammation in critically-ill and cardiac surgery patients, announced today that it has submitted an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct its proposed clinical trial using CytoSorb® intra-operatively in patients undergoing complex cardiac surgery requiring the use of a heart-lung machine. [More]