Critical Care News and Research RSS Feed - Critical Care News and Research

COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is associated with increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease such as heart failure or a heart attack, as well as diseases not associated with the heart. However, COPD is not by itself associated with increased likelihood of having a stroke or a systemic embolism, according to a new research study. [More]
Two-drug combination improves lung function in some cystic fibrosis patients

Two-drug combination improves lung function in some cystic fibrosis patients

The combination of two drugs — an investigational drug used in conjunction with an already FDA-approved medication — improved lung function in patients with one form of cystic fibrosis, according to two new studies. [More]
Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Carter and Conner, conjoined twin boys born Dec. 12, 2014, in Jacksonville, Fla., underwent a successful separation surgery on May 7, 2015. The 12-hour surgery was led by a team of highly skilled pediatric specialists that included Daniel Robie, MD, chief of pediatric general surgery, and Nicholas Poulos, MD, pediatric general surgeon, for Nemours Children's Specialty Care and Wolfson Children's Hospital. [More]
Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, received the Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award on April 28 at the University. [More]
UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

Researchers at UC Davis have developed a new intervention that identifies potentially depressed mothers and encourages them to seek treatment. The Motivating our Mothers (MOM) program takes a unique approach, relying on pediatricians rather than the mother's doctor for diagnosis. [More]
Mouth and tongue exercises can significantly reduce snoring frequency

Mouth and tongue exercises can significantly reduce snoring frequency

A Google search using the key words "snoring" and "treatment" yielded over 5 million results, but no standard treatment is available for primary snoring or snoring associated with a mild form of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Global haemophilia therapeutics market estimated to reach $13.43 billion in 2019

Global haemophilia therapeutics market estimated to reach $13.43 billion in 2019

Increased uptake of recombinant therapies and prophylactic use, coupled with improved diagnosis of haemophilia, is expected to drive the associated therapeutics market. Recombinant therapies are likely to command a premium price and fuel growth in developed markets, while heightened access to treatment and larger patient volumes due to more funding for critical care are anticipated to contribute to demand in emerging markets. [More]
Certain metabolites in the blood could predict clinical outcome in children undergoing heart surgery

Certain metabolites in the blood could predict clinical outcome in children undergoing heart surgery

The study, published today in the journal Critical Care Medicine and carried out at Royal Brompton Hospital, followed children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease, and found that by analysing metabolites in the blood -- molecules created as a result of metabolism -- it was possible to predict a child's clinical outcome. [More]
Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Bone-marrow-derived MSCs can promote fracture healing

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been transplanted to successfully treat a variety of diseases and conditions. The benefit of using MSCs is their ability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, such as osteoblasts (cells contributing to bone formation), chondrocytes (cartilage cells), adipocytes (fat cells), myocardiocytes (the muscle cells that make up the cardiac muscle), and neurons (nervous system cells). [More]
Study: Elevated upper body position may improve pregnancy-related obstructive sleep apnea

Study: Elevated upper body position may improve pregnancy-related obstructive sleep apnea

A study published on April 23 in the Online First section of the journal CHEST finds an elevated upper body position might improve respiratory safety in women early after childbirth without impairing sleep quality. [More]
National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don't know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke. [More]
Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Using a simple device for eight hours a night to treat sleep apnea can help people with prediabetes improve their blood sugar levels and may reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes, according to a new study published online in the April 21, 2015, issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. [More]
Children riding school buses with cleaner fuels and technologies experience better lung development

Children riding school buses with cleaner fuels and technologies experience better lung development

Use of clean fuels and updated pollution control measures in the school buses 25 million children ride every day could result in 14 million fewer absences from school a year, based on a study by the University of Michigan and the University of Washington. [More]
UTMB study highlights current use of oxygen therapy in patents with COPD

UTMB study highlights current use of oxygen therapy in patents with COPD

A new study about the use of oxygen to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that the majority of patients receiving oxygen therapy were low-income, non-Hispanic white females about 75 years old with two or more other health conditions. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Johns Hopkins study finds that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is often thought of as a symptom of warfare, major catastrophes and assault. It’s rarely considered in patients who survive a critical illness and stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, in a recent Johns Hopkins study, researchers found that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from PTSD. [More]
Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

The European Investment Bank has provided a EUR 160 million loan to Getinge AB, a global medical technology company, for its research and development in the areas of surgery, intensive care, infection control, care ergonomics and wound care. Getinge’s research addresses unmet medical needs and targets the development of new devices with higher efficiency and safety for increased positive outcomes for both caregivers and patients. [More]
Mylan introduces generic Sofosbuvir 400 mg tablets in India under brand name MyHep

Mylan introduces generic Sofosbuvir 400 mg tablets in India under brand name MyHep

Mylan N.V. today announced that its subsidiary, Mylan Pharmaceuticals Private Limited, has launched generic Sofosbuvir 400 mg tablets under the brand name MyHep in India. [More]

Columbia University School of Nursing receives $6.5 million to educate future nurse leaders

Columbia University School of Nursing has been awarded a $6.5 million grant from the Helene Fuld Health Trust for three vital projects that will educate future nurse leaders. [More]
Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is often thought of as a symptom of warfare, major catastrophes and assault. It's rarely considered in patients who survive a critical illness and stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement