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Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]
Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical, manufacturer and provider of innovative medical products, is pleased to announce its rollout of SKY 6Xi, disinfection technology for mobile devices. SKY 6Xi uses high intensity (254 nanometer wavelength) ultraviolet light in the "C" spectrum (UVC) at close proximity to thoroughly disinfect a mobile device. The unique power of SKY reduces the risk that Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are transmitted to patients while improving safety for healthcare workers. [More]

New technique of single-cell genomic analysis to reverse tissue engineering

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body. [More]
Low-cost empowerment program for adolescent girls sharply curtails sexual harassment

Low-cost empowerment program for adolescent girls sharply curtails sexual harassment

A low-cost empowerment program for adolescent girls in Kenyan slums sharply curtails rape and sexual harassment of these girls, who live in an environment where women have low status and are frequently attacked, a large new study shows. [More]

Researchers receive Presidential Recognition Awards at AIUM 2014 Annual Convention

Steven Goldstein, MD, President of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM), presented Presidential Recognition Awards to David Bahner, MD, RDMS, Bryann Bromley, MD, and Glynis Harvey, CAE, at the AIUM 2014 Annual Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada. [More]

Researchers discover tumor suppressor gene folliculin essential to normal lung function in BHD patients

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. [More]
Researchers reveal why Peel has one of highest rates of diabetes in Ontario

Researchers reveal why Peel has one of highest rates of diabetes in Ontario

According to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital, there are two significant reasons why Peel has one of the highest rates of diabetes in Ontario: neighbourhood design that discourages walking and a population with many residents whose ethnic backgrounds predispose them to diabetes. [More]

Researchers discover mechanism that control normal lung function in patients with BHD syndrome

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. Folliculin's absence or mutated state has a cascading effect that leads to deteriorated lung integrity and an impairment of lung function, as reported in their findings in the current issue of Cell Reports. [More]

Spike in mortality after cardiac surgery is associated with 30 days survival measurement

Analyzing a national database of hospital inpatient records, a team of researchers reports an expected spike in mortality six days after cardiac surgery, but also a more surprising and potentially troubling jump in deaths at the 30-day mark. [More]

Genkyotex’s GKT137831 reverses lung fibrosis in new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Genkyotex, the leading developer of selective NOX enzyme inhibitors, announced today the publication of data showing that GKT137831, a first in class NOX1 and 4 inhibitor, was able to reverse lung fibrosis associated with aging in a new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. [More]

Research offers scientific approach to make transporting decisions of critical-care patients

University of Cincinnati research is offering hospitals and trauma centers a unique, accurate and scientific approach to making decisions about transporting critical-care patients by air or by ambulance. [More]
1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

A third of intensive care patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical, or somatic, symptoms such as weakness, appetite change, and fatigue, rather than psychological symptoms, according to one of the largest studies to investigate the mental health and functional outcomes of survivors of critical care, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]
Loyola doctor offers precautionary measures against burn injury

Loyola doctor offers precautionary measures against burn injury

With a chilly start to spring many families are breaking out their fire pits or starting bonfires to recover from cabin fever and start enjoying being outside. Though fire pits and campfires are a great way to connect with friends and family they also can be dangerous to adults and kids. [More]

MCVI receives federal approval to launch adult heart transplant program at Memorial Regional Hospital

The Memorial Cardiac and Vascular Institute (MCVI), a leading provider of adult cardiac services in South Florida, has received federal approval from UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) to launch an adult heart transplant program at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood. [More]
BronchoGen genomic test meets primary endpoint in AEGIS-2 clinical trial

BronchoGen genomic test meets primary endpoint in AEGIS-2 clinical trial

Allegro Diagnostics Corp. today announced that the AEGIS-2 clinical trial has met its primary endpoint, demonstrating that the BronchoGen genomic test improves the accuracy of lung cancer diagnosis when used in combination with bronchoscopy. [More]
Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. [More]
Clinigen Group announces acquisition of SAVENE oncology support therapy from SpePharm

Clinigen Group announces acquisition of SAVENE oncology support therapy from SpePharm

Clinigen Group plc ('Clinigen' or the 'Group') the specialty global pharmaceutical company today announces the acquisition of SAVENE® (dexrazoxane) from SpePharm AG, a majority owned affiliate of Norgine B.V. The Financial terms of the acquisition are not being disclosed. [More]
Study reports benefits of implementing bronchiolitis guidelines at Children's Medical Center Dallas

Study reports benefits of implementing bronchiolitis guidelines at Children's Medical Center Dallas

Bronchiolitis, the number-one cause of infant hospitalizations nationally, was the focus of a multidisciplinary effort by physicians and clinicians at Children's Medical Center Dallas to establish and implement clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aimed at streamlining care and reducing unnecessary tests and therapies. [More]
Research: Underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does

Research: Underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does

Being underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does, new research has found. The connection between being underweight and the higher risk of dying is true for both adults and fetuses. [More]