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UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

A workshop at the University of California San Francisco helped critical care nurses improve their palliative care communication skills, according to an article in the July issue of the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

Tremendous variability in wait times for health care appointments exists throughout the U.S., ranging from same day service to several months, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. However, there is currently an opportunity to develop "systems-based approaches" -- similar to systems-based engineering approaches applied successfully in industries beyond health care -- that aim to provide immediate engagement of a patient's concern at the point of initial contact and can be used in in-person appointments as well as alternatives such as team-based care, electronic or telephone consultations, telehealth, and surge capacity agreements with other caregivers and facilities. [More]
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine publishes overview of MERS-CoV outbreak in Korea

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine publishes overview of MERS-CoV outbreak in Korea

An overview and analysis of the factors underlying the recent Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak in Korea has been published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
UC Davis pediatricians describe challenges faced by children with asthma in California

UC Davis pediatricians describe challenges faced by children with asthma in California

Low flu vaccination rates, medication compliance and limited access to primary care providers have contributed to the high pediatric asthma rates in California, say UC Davis pediatricians Ulfat Shaikh and Robert Byrd, who have published an extensive study describing the challenges faced by children with asthma in California. [More]
New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

New research reveals that polluted Toronto neighbourhoods have high rates of childhood asthma

Children who develop asthma in Toronto are more likely to have been born in a neighbourhood that has a high level of traffic-related air pollution, new research suggests. [More]
Researchers identify fast and accurate approach to diagnose respiratory tract infection

Researchers identify fast and accurate approach to diagnose respiratory tract infection

Researchers from the University of Manchester are part of a team that has identified an important new approach to diagnose infections in critically ill patients rapidly and accurately. [More]
Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins have been shown to reduce complications from cardiovascular surgery. To determine whether statins might also help those undergoing major lung surgeries, a team at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center conducted a well-designed study that randomized patients to receive either a statin or placebo before and after surgery. [More]
Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain anti-nausea medications used after operation could increase risk for irregular heartbeat

Certain commonly prescribed anti-nausea medications given to patients during or after an operation could increase their risk of developing an irregular heartbeat, new research has found. [More]
Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Autoantibodies play major role in IPF patients with acute exacerbations

Patients with acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis responded well to therapies similar to those used to treat autoimmune diseases, according to findings published today in PLOS ONE. The study suggests that autoantibodies — implicated in many autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus — also play an important role in patients with acute exacerbations of IPF, a devastating lung disease. [More]
Edwards Lifesciences announces FDA approval of SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic heart valve

Edwards Lifesciences announces FDA approval of SAPIEN 3 transcatheter aortic heart valve

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, today announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of its most advanced transcatheter aortic heart valve – the Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve with the Commander Delivery System – for the treatment of high-risk patients suffering from severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis. [More]
Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Completing sepsis resuscitation bundle in six hours after diagnosis

Blood poisoning, known as sepsis, is the most common cause of death in intensive care units, according to the National Institutes of Health. The body's immune response to fight the infection triggers inflammation that restricts blood flow and leads to multiple organ failure. [More]

Physicians have responsibility to help families make end-of-life decisions

About 20 percent of Americans spend time in an intensive care unit around the time of their death, and most deaths follow a decision to limit life-sustaining therapies. [More]

Critical care Breathe Technologies Life2000 Ventilation System receives FDA clearance

Breathe Technologies, Inc., a developer and manufacturer of medical technologies for patients with respiratory insufficiency and neuromuscular diseases, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted 510(k) clearance for its critical care Breathe Technologies Life2000 Ventilation System, which is intended to provide continuous or intermittent ventilatory support for the care of individuals who require mechanical ventilation. [More]
American Thoracic Society releases recommendations on achieving good quality sleep

American Thoracic Society releases recommendations on achieving good quality sleep

The American Thoracic Society has released a policy statement with recommendations for clinicians and the general public on achieving good quality sleep and getting an adequate quantity of sleep. [More]
Older asthmatic patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids at increased risk for treatment failure

Older asthmatic patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids at increased risk for treatment failure

Older patients with asthma are at increased risk for treatment failure, particularly those patients being treated with inhaled corticosteroids, according to a new study. [More]
Patients with community-acquired pneumonia have high rates of long-term morbidity and mortality

Patients with community-acquired pneumonia have high rates of long-term morbidity and mortality

Having had community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) greatly increases the risk of long-term morbidity and mortality compared to the general population who have never had CAP, according to a new study from researchers in Canada, the longest and largest outcomes study of patients with CAP reported to date. [More]
New web-based community portal aims to improve diagnosis and treatment for sleep apnea

New web-based community portal aims to improve diagnosis and treatment for sleep apnea

A new web-based community portal, http://www.MyApnea.Org, is recruiting patients, caregivers and those at risk for sleep apnea to join a growing community of patients and researchers to better understand sleep apnea through information sharing, support and research. [More]
Simple steps help accelerate recovery, reduce cost of care in people undergoing colorectal surgery

Simple steps help accelerate recovery, reduce cost of care in people undergoing colorectal surgery

Simple steps that include the consistent use of experienced medical teams for a single type of surgery, preemptive antibiotics before the procedure, less reliance on potent opioids during recovery and urging patients to get out of bed and move around sooner can not only prevent infections, blood clots and other serious complications in people undergoing colorectal operations, but can also accelerate recovery and reduce cost of care, according to results of an ongoing program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. [More]
Weight loss reduces asthma severity in obese adults, finds study

Weight loss reduces asthma severity in obese adults, finds study

A Canadian study published in the June issue of the journal CHEST found weight loss reduced asthma severity as measured by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in obese adults. [More]
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