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Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

While 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions, only 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns' genomes. [More]

VACC designs new program to educate industry professionals on vascular access

Understanding the needs of health providers and their interaction with patients is paramount to the role of the employees of ICU Medical which provides clinicians around the world with innovative and cost-effective solutions for clinical needs. [More]

Study helps physicians better identify patients at risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. [More]

Jersey Shore opens new CVICU to provide post-operative care for cardiac surgery patients

Jersey Shore University Medical Center recently unveiled the new CardioVascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) - a twelve bed critical care unit providing post-operative care for cardiac surgery patients, including those who receive traditional open heart surgery and newer, complex interventional cardiovascular procedures. [More]
MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX, Inc., today announced the acquisition of Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates, Inc., a private practice physician group based in Fredericksburg, Va. The practice will become part of MEDNAX's American Anesthesiology division and is the third Virginia-based anesthesia practice to join the division. [More]
Researchers unravel complex genetic coding that allows embryonic cells to proliferate, perform myriad biological tasks

Researchers unravel complex genetic coding that allows embryonic cells to proliferate, perform myriad biological tasks

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body. [More]
Benzodiazepines may contribute to respiratory problems in people with COPD

Benzodiazepines may contribute to respiratory problems in people with COPD

A group of drugs commonly prescribed for insomnia, anxiety and breathing issues "significantly increase the risk" that older people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, need to visit a doctor or Emergency Department for respiratory reasons, new research has found. [More]

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

New insight provides potential to improve treatment for sepsis

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions worldwide every year, including more than 200,000 Americans. [More]
Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical releases SKY 6Xi disinfection technology for mobile devices

Daylight Medical, manufacturer and provider of innovative medical products, is pleased to announce its rollout of SKY 6Xi, disinfection technology for mobile devices. SKY 6Xi uses high intensity (254 nanometer wavelength) ultraviolet light in the "C" spectrum (UVC) at close proximity to thoroughly disinfect a mobile device. The unique power of SKY reduces the risk that Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are transmitted to patients while improving safety for healthcare workers. [More]

New technique of single-cell genomic analysis to reverse tissue engineering

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body. [More]
Low-cost empowerment program for adolescent girls sharply curtails sexual harassment

Low-cost empowerment program for adolescent girls sharply curtails sexual harassment

A low-cost empowerment program for adolescent girls in Kenyan slums sharply curtails rape and sexual harassment of these girls, who live in an environment where women have low status and are frequently attacked, a large new study shows. [More]

Researchers receive Presidential Recognition Awards at AIUM 2014 Annual Convention

Steven Goldstein, MD, President of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM), presented Presidential Recognition Awards to David Bahner, MD, RDMS, Bryann Bromley, MD, and Glynis Harvey, CAE, at the AIUM 2014 Annual Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada. [More]

Researchers discover tumor suppressor gene folliculin essential to normal lung function in BHD patients

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. [More]
Researchers reveal why Peel has one of highest rates of diabetes in Ontario

Researchers reveal why Peel has one of highest rates of diabetes in Ontario

According to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital, there are two significant reasons why Peel has one of the highest rates of diabetes in Ontario: neighbourhood design that discourages walking and a population with many residents whose ethnic backgrounds predispose them to diabetes. [More]

Researchers discover mechanism that control normal lung function in patients with BHD syndrome

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. Folliculin's absence or mutated state has a cascading effect that leads to deteriorated lung integrity and an impairment of lung function, as reported in their findings in the current issue of Cell Reports. [More]

Spike in mortality after cardiac surgery is associated with 30 days survival measurement

Analyzing a national database of hospital inpatient records, a team of researchers reports an expected spike in mortality six days after cardiac surgery, but also a more surprising and potentially troubling jump in deaths at the 30-day mark. [More]

Genkyotex’s GKT137831 reverses lung fibrosis in new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Genkyotex, the leading developer of selective NOX enzyme inhibitors, announced today the publication of data showing that GKT137831, a first in class NOX1 and 4 inhibitor, was able to reverse lung fibrosis associated with aging in a new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. [More]

Research offers scientific approach to make transporting decisions of critical-care patients

University of Cincinnati research is offering hospitals and trauma centers a unique, accurate and scientific approach to making decisions about transporting critical-care patients by air or by ambulance. [More]
1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

A third of intensive care patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical, or somatic, symptoms such as weakness, appetite change, and fatigue, rather than psychological symptoms, according to one of the largest studies to investigate the mental health and functional outcomes of survivors of critical care, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]