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Medicone Medical Response selected as one of fastest growing companies in the US

MedicOne Medical Response, a leading provider emergency and non-emergency ambulance transport services, has been selected by Inc. Magazine as one of the fastest growing private companies in America. [More]
Instrumentation Laboratory announces launch of HemosIL Direct Thrombin Inhibitor Assay in Europe

Instrumentation Laboratory announces launch of HemosIL Direct Thrombin Inhibitor Assay in Europe

Instrumentation Laboratory today announced the commercialization in Europe of their HemosIL Direct Thrombin Inhibitor (DTI) Assay. When used in conjunction with HemosIL Dabigatran Calibrators and Controls, this test offers an automated solution for the measurement of dabigatran, a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC). [More]
Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

High-dose opioid prescribing increased by 23 per cent in Canada between 2006 and 2011, despite clinical guidelines recommending that most patients should avoid high-doses of these drugs, according to new research. [More]
Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Peer pressure influences adherence to hand hygiene

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. [More]
Most prevalent form of discrimination is due to mental illness and homelessness

Most prevalent form of discrimination is due to mental illness and homelessness

Vulnerable populations in ethnically diverse Toronto reported more discrimination by health care workers based on their housing status, mental health or substance abuse issues than race, a new study has found. [More]
Treatment with xenon gas after head injury reduces extent of brain damage

Treatment with xenon gas after head injury reduces extent of brain damage

Treatment with xenon gas after a head injury reduces the extent of brain damage, according to a study in mice. [More]
New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Two new potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a deadly disease marked by high blood pressure in the lungs, have been identified by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Sepsis patients more likely to survive when treated at hospital with higher volume of cases

Sepsis patients more likely to survive when treated at hospital with higher volume of cases

Patients with sepsis, one of the most time-sensitive and hard-to-detect illnesses in medicine, are more likely to survive the life-threatening condition when treated at a hospital that sees a higher volume of sepsis cases. [More]
New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

New paper highlights ways to improve outcomes of Ebola virus infection

The largest-ever Ebola virus disease outbreak is ravaging West Africa, but with more personnel, basic monitoring, and supportive treatment, many of the sickest patients with Ebola virus disease do not need to die, note the authors of a new paper published ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]
CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

CHLA ECMO program honored with prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support

The Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation program at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been honored for the third time with the prestigious Award for Excellence in Life Support by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization, an international group of health care professionals and scientists who evaluate hospital treatment therapies for patients fighting complex cardiac disease and respiratory failure. [More]
International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
Futile medical care crowds out other patients

Futile medical care crowds out other patients

Every day in intensive care units across the country, patients get aggressive, expensive treatment their caregivers know is not going to save their lives or make them better. California researchers now report this so-called "futile" care has a hidden price: It's crowding out other patients who could otherwise survive, recover and get back to living their lives. [More]
Receiving prescription at discharge improves outcomes in stroke patients

Receiving prescription at discharge improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke patients are 70 per cent more likely to continue taking their stroke prevention medications one year later if they have a prescription in hand when discharged - according to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. [More]
Educating clinicians can reduce sepsis patient mortality and lower hospital costs

Educating clinicians can reduce sepsis patient mortality and lower hospital costs

Sepsis is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and new research published in the Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ) shows that educating clinicians about expediting diagnosis and administration of antibiotics can reduce sepsis patient mortality and lower hospital costs. [More]
Research to determine breath test's effectivness in patient with COPD

Research to determine breath test's effectivness in patient with COPD

NYU Langone Medical Center will lead a new clinical initiative -- funded by a $225,000 grant from The National Institutes of Health -- to determine a breath test's effectivness to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human breath that are biomarkers of chronic obstrutive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
CHEST issues new expert guidance while global health-care community cares for Ebola patients

CHEST issues new expert guidance while global health-care community cares for Ebola patients

The American College of Chest Physicians announces the immediate release of Care of the Critically Ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: CHEST Consensus Statement today in the Online First section of the journal CHEST while the global health-care community cares for patients with the Ebola virus. [More]
Australian researcher says emergency department nurses are 'a special breed'

Australian researcher says emergency department nurses are 'a special breed'

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us - they are more extroverted, agreeable and open - attributes that make them successful in the demanding, fast-paced and often stressful environment of an emergency department, according to a new study by University of Sydney. [More]
Electronic alerts reduce urinary tract infections in hospital patients with urinary catheters

Electronic alerts reduce urinary tract infections in hospital patients with urinary catheters

A Penn Medicine team has found that targeted automated alerts in electronic health records significantly reduce urinary tract infections in hospital patients with urinary catheters. In addition, when the design of the alert was simplified, the rate of improvement dramatically increased. [More]