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GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

A chemical produced in the pancreas that prevented and even reversed Type 1 diabetes in mice had the same effect on human beta cells transplanted into mice, new research has found. [More]
Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

Researchers say that nervous system may play vital role in infections, autoimmune diseases

The nervous system may play a bigger role in infections and autoimmune diseases than previously known. If researchers can learn more about that role, it could provide insight into diagnosing and treating everything from the stomach flu to rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
People with sleep apnea have lower peak oxygen uptake during aerobic activity

People with sleep apnea have lower peak oxygen uptake during aerobic activity

People with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea may have an intrinsic inability to burn high amounts of oxygen during strenuous aerobic exercise, according to a new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. [More]
Abaxis completes acquisition of QCR & Trio Diagnostics

Abaxis completes acquisition of QCR & Trio Diagnostics

Abaxis, Inc., a medical products company manufacturing point-of-care instruments and consumables for the medical, research, and veterinary markets worldwide and providing reference lab services to the veterinary and research markets in the United States, announced today the completion of a stock purchase agreement to acquire 100% of QCR & Trio Diagnostics Limited, a United Kingdom based distribution organization. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Echo Therapeutics reports net loss of $5.5 million for third quarter 2014

Echo Therapeutics reports net loss of $5.5 million for third quarter 2014

Echo Therapeutics, Inc., a medical device company, today announced its financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Discovery opens up new routes to strengthen anti-smoking efforts to control TB

Discovery opens up new routes to strengthen anti-smoking efforts to control TB

TB is an infectious disease that kills 1.5 million people each year, and smoking is the biggest driver of the global TB epidemic. Medical scientists at Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital in Ireland have unlocked the mechanism underlying the connection between smoking and Tuberculosis (TB). [More]
Experts focus on key issues impeding delivery of cardiac care in resource-limited settings

Experts focus on key issues impeding delivery of cardiac care in resource-limited settings

Critical care is defined by life-threatening conditions, which require close evaluation, monitoring, and treatment by appropriately trained health professionals. Cardiovascular care bears these same requirements. [More]
Study: Critically ill newborns may be exposed to DEHP chemicals in medical products

Study: Critically ill newborns may be exposed to DEHP chemicals in medical products

Hospitalized premature infants are exposed to unsafe levels of a chemical found in numerous medical products used to treat them, raising questions about whether critically ill newborns may be adversely affected by equipment designed to help save their lives. [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified what appears to be a molecular switch controlling inflammatory processes involved in conditions ranging from muscle atrophy to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
AACN invites nurses, other healthcare professionals for NTI 2015

AACN invites nurses, other healthcare professionals for NTI 2015

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses invites nurses and other healthcare professionals who care for high acuity and critically ill patients and their families to its 2015 National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition (NTI) in San Diego, May 18-21, with preconferences May 17. [More]
New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

New program aims to educate COPD patients on how to manage their disease

The American Thoracic Society today announced a new program, produced with support from Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., to provide materials to educate patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) about this progressive lung disease and how it can be managed. [More]
Discovery Laboratories reports net loss of $11.3 million for third quarter 2014

Discovery Laboratories reports net loss of $11.3 million for third quarter 2014

Discovery Laboratories, Inc., a specialty biotechnology company dedicated to advancing a new standard in respiratory critical care, today announced financial results for the third quarter ended September 30, 2014, as well as recent business updates. [More]
Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

Penn researchers show that 23% of patients who survive septic shock return to hospital within 30 days

A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life. [More]

Top 5 things to talk about in end-of-life discussions with hospitalized patients, their families

A study led by a McMaster University researcher has identified the top five things health care teams should discuss with hospitalized patients and their families at the end of life, but the research also found gaps between what patients would like and the care they receive. [More]
Common drug could become the future standard of care for HE patients

Common drug could become the future standard of care for HE patients

A common drug used to clean a person's bowels before a colonoscopy could become the future standard of care for patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a mental disorientation problem that affects up to one in two cirrhosis patients. [More]
Resilience training program may help ICU nurses better handle stressful work environment

Resilience training program may help ICU nurses better handle stressful work environment

A multifaceted approach to teaching coping mechanisms may help critical care nurses better handle their stressful work environment, according to a study in the November issue of American Journal of Critical Care (AJCC). [More]
New policy targeting hospital readmissions for COPD may hurt vulnerable patients, say experts

New policy targeting hospital readmissions for COPD may hurt vulnerable patients, say experts

Last week, the federal government revealed that it will fine more than 2,600 hospitals in the coming year, because too many Medicare patients treated at these hospitals are ending up back in the hospital within 30 days of going home. Two new conditions have been added in this round of penalties: elective hip and knee replacement and chronic lung disease. [More]
Group encourages approval of lung cancer screening for eligible Medicare patients

Group encourages approval of lung cancer screening for eligible Medicare patients

As the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Committee on Coverage studies the decision to cover lung cancer screening for eligible individuals, today's Online First section of the journal CHEST published Components for High Quality Lung Cancer Screening: American College of Chest Physicians and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement. [More]