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Potential new treatment for sepsis and ARDS

Potential new treatment for sepsis and ARDS

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast are developing a potential revolutionary new treatment for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), which are among the leading causes of death in hospitalised patients in the UK. [More]
Researchers develop new method that can target drug delivery to the lung

Researchers develop new method that can target drug delivery to the lung

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center have developed a new method that can target delivery of very small volumes of drugs into the lung. [More]
Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

In use for more than a century, inhaled anesthetics like nitrous oxide and halothane have made modern surgery possible. Now, in experiments in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have added to evidence that certain so-called "volatile" anesthetics -- commonly used during surgeries -- may also possess powerful effects on the immune system that can combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung, including influenza and pneumonia. [More]
Study calls for new strategies to shape perceptions of patients at risk for falls in hospitals

Study calls for new strategies to shape perceptions of patients at risk for falls in hospitals

Falls are the most common adverse event among hospitalized patients, and a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Critical Care examines an often overlooked element to preventing falls in hospitals: patient perceptions of their personal risk. [More]
Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

The inner-city neighbourhood in which someone lives may affect his or her risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease, a new research paper suggests. [More]
Study: EMS-initiated CPR for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be performed for 35 minutes

Study: EMS-initiated CPR for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be performed for 35 minutes

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be conducted for at least 35 minutes, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Yoshikazu Goto, associate professor and director of the Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine at Kanazawa University Hospital in Kanazawa, Japan. [More]
Colorado PERA now offers new hip and knee replacement benefit option for retirees in pre-Medicare program

Colorado PERA now offers new hip and knee replacement benefit option for retirees in pre-Medicare program

Taking a critical step in eliminating confusion around health care costs, as well as addressing a significant need among today's retired workers, Colorado Public Employees' Retirement Association announced it will now offer its retirees in the pre-Medicare program a new hip and knee replacement benefit option called PERACare Select. [More]
ieCrowd announces achievement of major milestone in commercial development of Smart Oxygen device

ieCrowd announces achievement of major milestone in commercial development of Smart Oxygen device

ieCrowd today announced the achievement of an important milestone in the commercial development of the company's supplemental oxygen delivery device, Smart Oxygen. The Smart Oxygen device, being developed by ieCrowd's subsidiary Smart Oxygen Solutions, automatically adjusts to a patient's changing demand for oxygen based on level of activity. [More]

Edwards Lifesciences closes acquisition of CardiAQ Valve Technologies

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, today announced that it has closed its acquisition of CardiAQ Valve Technologies, Inc., a privately held company and developer of a transcatheter mitral valve replacement system. Edwards announced last month that it had signed an agreement to acquire CardiAQ. [More]
Paramedic care improves survival for paediatric patients who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital

Paramedic care improves survival for paediatric patients who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital

Less than 10 per cent of paediatric patients who suffer a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital survive. There are many factors which can influence survival rates; paramedic care is one of them. [More]
Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

Few U.S. hospitals comply with CDC infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions

According to a survey conducted by Rhode Island Hospital researchers, there is significant variability regarding how clinicians manage catheters placed in the arteries of patients in intensive care units. Some practices may increase risk of infection associated with these catheters. Fewer than half of those surveyed complied with current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) infection prevention guidelines for arterial catheter insertions. [More]
New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

A new study has found a "significant association" between adults who have suffered a traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives and who also have attention deficit hyperactive disorder. [More]
Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

In 2011, the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society issued a guideline recommending that neonates undergoing cardiac surgery for repair of congenital heart disease be placed on continuous encephalographic (EEG) monitoring after surgery to detect seizures. These recommendations followed reports that seizures are common in this population, may not be detected clinically, and are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes. [More]
Pitt unveils research-based guidance to improve compliance while treating sepsis

Pitt unveils research-based guidance to improve compliance while treating sepsis

As hospitals nationwide brace for rigorous mandates for care of septic patients that will be adopted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in October, a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine review unveils research-based guidance to improve compliance when treating this common and deadly syndrome. [More]
U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

With every breath you take, microbes have a chance of making it into your lungs. But what happens when they get there? And why do dangerous lung infections like pneumonia happen in some people, but not others? Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have started to answer these questions by studying the microbiome of the lungs - the community of microscopic organisms that are in constant contact with our respiratory system. [More]
Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Breastfeeding may lead to substantial reduction in common infections among Indigenous babies

Promoting breastfeeding could lead to a substantial reduction in common infections and even deaths that are more common in Indigenous infants than non-Indigenous infants, a new study suggests. [More]
MGH papers reveal the way anesthetics affect brains of older patients and children

MGH papers reveal the way anesthetics affect brains of older patients and children

Recent Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigations into the neurobiology underlying the effects of general anesthesia have begun to reveal the ways different anesthetic agents alter specific aspects of the brain's electrical signals, reflected by EEG (electroencephalogram) signatures. While those studies have provided information that may lead to improved techniques for monitoring the consciousness of patients receiving general anesthesia, until now they have been conducted in relatively young adult patients. [More]
Ontario nearing ambitious UN targets for ending AIDS epidemics

Ontario nearing ambitious UN targets for ending AIDS epidemics

A new study suggests Ontario is nearing ambitious United Nations targets for ending the AIDS epidemics: By 2020, 90 per cent of all people living with HIV should know their HIV status, 90 per cent of all people diagnosed with HIV are receiving sustained antiretroviral drug therapy and 90 per cent of people on ART have a very low or undetectable levels of the virus. [More]
Psychological disorders in COPD patients predict early hospital readmission

Psychological disorders in COPD patients predict early hospital readmission

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that people with a psychological condition such as depression, anxiety, psychosis, or alcohol/drug abuse are more likely to be readmitted early into a hospital for complications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. [More]
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