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New approach may help primary care clinicians to diagnose many patients with COPD

New approach may help primary care clinicians to diagnose many patients with COPD

With five simple questions and an inexpensive peak expiratory flow (PEF) meter, primary care clinicians may be able to diagnose many more patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Follow [More]
Study shows physicians in pediatric ICUs do not use newest guidelines to diagnose AKI in children

Study shows physicians in pediatric ICUs do not use newest guidelines to diagnose AKI in children

A study by University at Buffalo researchers has shown that physicians in pediatric intensive care units are not using the newest guidelines to diagnose acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill children, a practice that could affect their patients' long-term health. [More]
Long-term oxygen therapy does not benefit COPD patients with moderately low blood oxygen levels

Long-term oxygen therapy does not benefit COPD patients with moderately low blood oxygen levels

A newly published study of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) concludes that long-term supplemental oxygen treatment results in little or no change in time to death, time to first hospitalizations or significant quality of life improvements for those with moderately low blood oxygen levels. [More]
Study reveals way to actively reverse anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

Study reveals way to actively reverse anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

The latest study from a Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Institute of Technology team investigating the mechanisms underlying general anesthesia finds that stimulating a specific group of neurons in mice produces signs of arousal -- including getting on their feet and walking -- even as the animals continue to receive the anesthetic drug isoflurane. [More]
CHEST, ATS release new guidelines for discontinuing mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults

CHEST, ATS release new guidelines for discontinuing mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults

The American College of Chest Physicians and the American Thoracic Society have published new guidelines for discontinuing mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. [More]
New studies support secretoneurin as new biomarker for cardiovascular disease

New studies support secretoneurin as new biomarker for cardiovascular disease

Scandinavian cardiovascular diagnostics specialist CardiNor AS today announced two new studies have been published by the group at Akershus University Hospital led by Professor Torbjørn Omland and Associate Professor Helge Røsjø in leading journals that strongly support secretoneurin as a new, important biomarker for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Perceptions of e-cigarette vary among lung health professionals, survey reveals

Perceptions of e-cigarette vary among lung health professionals, survey reveals

At the CHEST Annual Meeting 2016 in Los Angeles, results from an online questionnaire sent to members of the American College of Chest Physicians earlier this year revealed that perceptions of e-cigarette harms and benefits among lung health professionals vary. [More]

Study assesses accuracy of COPD diagnoses and utilization of spirometry in primary care clinics

According to the recommendations of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), spirometry should be performed to establish the diagnosis of COPD in any patient who has a history of chronic cough, sputum production, difficulty breathing, or exposure to risk factors. [More]
Bluetooth technology improves adherence to cystic fibrosis medication, new study shows

Bluetooth technology improves adherence to cystic fibrosis medication, new study shows

According to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry, more than 70,000 people worldwide are suffering from the disease, with approximately 1,000 new cases diagnosed each year in the United States alone. [More]
Blood tests may decrease wait time between diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer

Blood tests may decrease wait time between diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer

A study from Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin, reveals to the value of blood-based genomic and proteomic testing in patients with lung cancer at the time of initial diagnoses. [More]
Urgent Matters announces recipients of Emergency Care Innovation of the Year Award

Urgent Matters announces recipients of Emergency Care Innovation of the Year Award

Urgent Matters, Philips Blue Jay Consulting, and Schumacher Clinical Partners are pleased to announce the winners of the Emergency Care Innovation of the Year Award, a competition to foster innovation in emergency departments nationwide. [More]
New clinical study to examine safety and outcomes of body cooling in cardiac arrest patients

New clinical study to examine safety and outcomes of body cooling in cardiac arrest patients

The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland has opened a clinical trial to study whether rapidly cooling the body temperature of patients whose hearts stop due to massive blood loss will give surgeons extra time to find and repair injuries, and in turn, help save their lives. [More]
New casting technique could help avoid surgery in elderly patients with unstable ankle fractures

New casting technique could help avoid surgery in elderly patients with unstable ankle fractures

Elderly patients with unstable ankle fractures could avoid surgery, according to research by a UK team led by Oxford University. [More]
Study examines role of religion in cancer screening

Study examines role of religion in cancer screening

Does religion affect people's likelihood of being screened for cancer? That's the question Dr. Aisha Lofters and her team at St. Michael's Hospital are trying to answer. [More]
Eating oat fibre can reduce three markers linked to cardiovascular risk

Eating oat fibre can reduce three markers linked to cardiovascular risk

Researchers have known for more than 50 years that eating oats can lower cholesterol levels and thus reduce a person's risk of developing cardiovascular disease. [More]
Climate change has negative consequences for patients' health, survey finds

Climate change has negative consequences for patients' health, survey finds

A survey of international members of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) found that 96 percent of respondents agreed that climate change is occurring and 81 percent indicated that climate change has direct relevance to patient care. [More]
Researchers suggest effective diagnostic tool for identifying post-concussion syndrome

Researchers suggest effective diagnostic tool for identifying post-concussion syndrome

Repeated concussions or other mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to prolonged symptoms and impaired quality of life. [More]
Researchers find key risk factors for physical decline among survivors of ARDS

Researchers find key risk factors for physical decline among survivors of ARDS

A new study by a team of Johns Hopkins researchers found that most survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decline physically in the five years after hospital discharge, and those at higher levels of risk of decline are older and had greater medical problems prior to hospitalization for ARDS. [More]
CCN article outlines unique treatment options for cardiovascular patients with HIV

CCN article outlines unique treatment options for cardiovascular patients with HIV

Cardiovascular disease has become the leading cause of death for those living with HIV, as the infection has moved from a terminal disease to a chronic illness. [More]
High indoor temperatures may worsen COPD symptoms

High indoor temperatures may worsen COPD symptoms

High indoor temperatures appear to worsen symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, particularly in homes that also have high levels of air pollutants, according to new research published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
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