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Low-level exposures to air pollution may affect normal lung function in children

Low-level exposures to air pollution may affect normal lung function in children

Dramatic improvements in air quality in U.S. cities since the 1990s may not be enough to ensure normal lung function in children, according to new research published in the April 15 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care, a journal of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Bronchial thermoplasty improves quality of life for severe refractory asthmatics

Bronchial thermoplasty improves quality of life for severe refractory asthmatics

Among people with asthma, lower socioeconomic status, education level, and ethnic minority status clearly have undesirable effects on their care and outcomes. Patients with severe disease who attend county (public) hospitals in the United States tend to have less access to resources, which, in addition to environmental and compliance issues, may contribute to poorer disease control. [More]
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
Unhealthy BMIs, smoking, drinking alcohol and solid fuel use increase asthma risk in women

Unhealthy BMIs, smoking, drinking alcohol and solid fuel use increase asthma risk in women

Underweight and obese women who also drank alcohol and smoked tobacco had a two-fold higher risk of being diagnosed with asthma than women with a healthy body mass index who did not drink or smoke, a St. Michael's Hospital study found. [More]
Study finds evidence of lung function abnormalities in light-use hookah smokers

Study finds evidence of lung function abnormalities in light-use hookah smokers

A study of light-use hookah or waterpipe smokers found evidence of lung function abnormalities, including marked changes in cells lining the airways. The study, "Pulmonary Abnormalities in Young, Light-use Waterpipe (Hookah) Smokers," was published recently in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Article provides specific nursing considerations related to caring for patients experiencing prolonged seizure

Article provides specific nursing considerations related to caring for patients experiencing prolonged seizure

Time is of the essence when a patient experiences a prolonged seizure, and immediate action is required to prevent long-term neurological damage, according to an article in the April issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
Understanding idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an interview with Michael Durheim, M.D.

Understanding idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an interview with Michael Durheim, M.D.

IPF is a rare and fatal lung disease that causes permanent scarring of the lungs, leading to debilitating shortness of breath and cough in affected patients. It affects as many as 132,000 Americans, most commonly those over the age of 65. [More]
Professor Michael Grocott appointed as new member of Sphere’s Medical Advisory Board

Professor Michael Grocott appointed as new member of Sphere’s Medical Advisory Board

Sphere Medical, an innovator company in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, today announces the appointment of Professor Michael Grocott to its Medical Advisory Board. [More]
Teach-to-goal inhaler education improves mastery of life-saving technique

Teach-to-goal inhaler education improves mastery of life-saving technique

A rescue inhaler can be a lifesaver during an asthma or COPD flareup, but using a rescue inhaler is complicated and misuse is common, putting patients' lives at risk. An education strategy, called teach-to-goal, may help patients use their inhalers properly during these critical times, according to research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Penn study calls on physicians to avoid over-prescribing opioids for surgical patients

Penn study calls on physicians to avoid over-prescribing opioids for surgical patients

Physicians are prescribing more opioid painkillers than ever before to patients undergoing common surgeries, according to new research from the department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Edwards Lifesciences' SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve approved in Japan

Edwards Lifesciences' SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve approved in Japan

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring, today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare approved the Edwards SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve for the treatment of patients suffering from severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis. [More]
People with type 2 diabetes, OSA may not experience improved glycemic control with CPAP

People with type 2 diabetes, OSA may not experience improved glycemic control with CPAP

People with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may not experience improved glycemic control by using continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, as some studies have suggested, according to the results of a randomized, controlled trial published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis, also known as scleroderma, is a rare disease characterized by the thickening and scarring of connective tissue of multiple organs in the body [More]
CPAP appears to improve glycemic control in patients with OSA and type 2 diabetes

CPAP appears to improve glycemic control in patients with OSA and type 2 diabetes

Continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, appears to improve glycemic control in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes that is not well controlled, according to research published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
New pain management technique can reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients

New pain management technique can reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients

Anesthesiologists can significantly reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients using a new pain management technique, a new study has found. [More]
Consultation between geriatrician and trauma surgeons improves care of elderly accident victims

Consultation between geriatrician and trauma surgeons improves care of elderly accident victims

An immediate consultation between trauma surgeons and a geriatrician improves multidisciplinary care of elderly accident victims and the sensitivity of the family to the patient's ongoing health care needs. [More]
FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today announced it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that expands the clinical claims of the Thermo Scientific B·R·A·H·M·S PCT biomarker assay for sepsis risk assessment. [More]
Freestanding organ recovery facility for brain-dead donors increases organ transplant

Freestanding organ recovery facility for brain-dead donors increases organ transplant

Transplant surgeons report that obtaining organs from deceased organ donors costs much less and leads to a higher number of transplantable organs recovered when brain-dead donors are moved from the hospital to an independent, freestanding facility dedicated to organ recovery. Their study is published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website in advance of print publication later this year. [More]
Children's Hospital Colorado study outlines preparedness for future enterovirus D68 outbreaks

Children's Hospital Colorado study outlines preparedness for future enterovirus D68 outbreaks

From August to September 2014, a typically slow time for respiratory viruses, a nationwide outbreak of enterovirus D68 left resources constrained for Children's Hospital Colorado and pediatric organizations throughout the nation. [More]
Impact of central catheter maintenance bundle on central line-associated bloodstream infections

Impact of central catheter maintenance bundle on central line-associated bloodstream infections

A central catheter maintenance bundle developed to prevent a common healthcare-associated infection had an immediate effect of decreasing rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections, according to a study in the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
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