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Weight loss reduces asthma severity in obese adults, finds study

Weight loss reduces asthma severity in obese adults, finds study

A Canadian study published in the June issue of the journal CHEST found weight loss reduced asthma severity as measured by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in obese adults. [More]
Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Although there is no one established universal cause of cancer, genetic changes are central to its development. The accumulation of spontaneous genetic changes, or mutations, that occur when cells divide can be hastened by exposure to carcinogens such as cigarette smoke (lung cancer) and infectious agents such as the papillomavirus (cervical cancer). [More]
New therapeutic target discovered for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

New therapeutic target discovered for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease for which as yet no causal therapy exists. It is, however, known that the lung interstitium - the connective tissue between the air sacs in the lower part of the lung - is affected. [More]
St. Michael's Hospital researchers find novel method to combat flu virus

St. Michael's Hospital researchers find novel method to combat flu virus

The flu kills hundreds of thousands of people around the world every year, yet there is essentially only one class of drugs to fight the ever-changing virus. Cases of flu resistant to this class of drugs have already been reported and researchers worry a completely new strain of flu could evolve, leading to a pandemic like the one in 1918 that killed approximately 50 million people. [More]
Experimental Zephyr endobronchial valve provides good result in emphysema patient at UAB

Experimental Zephyr endobronchial valve provides good result in emphysema patient at UAB

In late March, physicians at the University of Alabama at Birmingham carefully threaded a one-way valve the size of a black-eyed pea into the lower lobe of Dennis Bullock's left lung. Bullock, a 67-year-old emphysema patient, was the fourth person at UAB to receive the experimental Zephyr endobronchial valve. [More]
Delirium in ICU associated with lengthier hospital stays and greater risk of death

Delirium in ICU associated with lengthier hospital stays and greater risk of death

About one-third of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) will develop delirium, a condition that lengthens hospital stays and substantially increases one's risk of dying in the hospital, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers appearing in the British Medical Journal. [More]
Transitional and progressive care can help patients achieve functional recovery faster in post-acute care

Transitional and progressive care can help patients achieve functional recovery faster in post-acute care

Transitional care has emerged as a way to reduce hospital readmissions, and progressive care nurses can play an integral role in efforts to help patients achieve functional recovery faster in post-acute care, according to an article in the June issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers examine how human factors contribute to surgical errors

Mayo Clinic researchers examine how human factors contribute to surgical errors

Why are major surgical errors called "never events?" Because they shouldn't happen — but do. Mayo Clinic researchers identified 69 never events among 1.5 million invasive procedures performed over five years and detailed why each occurred. Using a system created to investigate military plane crashes, they coded the human behaviors involved to identify any environmental, organizational, job and individual characteristics that led to the never events. [More]
Neutrolin post marketing surveillance data presented at 52nd ERA-EDTA Congress

Neutrolin post marketing surveillance data presented at 52nd ERA-EDTA Congress

CorMedix Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing therapeutic products for the prevention and treatment of cardiac, renal and infectious diseases, today announced a presentation on Neutrolin® post marketing surveillance data at the 52nd European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Congress. [More]
People who have more social support less likely to experience intimate-partner violence

People who have more social support less likely to experience intimate-partner violence

People who had more social support, including trust and a sense of belonging, were less likely to experience emotional or verbal abuse while in a relationship, said a study published today in the American Journal of Community Psychology. [More]
Statins reduce risk of death by 67% in CABG surgery

Statins reduce risk of death by 67% in CABG surgery

Research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia exploring the protective effect of various heart medications that patients are taking before undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery concludes that statins reduce the risk of death by two thirds, or 67 percent, while no consistent effects were seen for other medications. [More]
Strategies needed to optimize communications between police and ED workers

Strategies needed to optimize communications between police and ED workers

A good working relationship with police is essential for the smooth operation of a busy Emergency Department. Police are in and out of EDs regularly, supporting EMS, transporting patients and helping to provide a safe environment for hospital staff. [More]
Mucus dehydration may contribute to chronic bronchitis

Mucus dehydration may contribute to chronic bronchitis

Mucus dehydration may lead to reduced mucociliary clearance and symptoms of chronic bronchitis, research suggests. [More]
COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

COPD associated with increased mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation, but not stroke

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is associated with increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease such as heart failure or a heart attack, as well as diseases not associated with the heart. However, COPD is not by itself associated with increased likelihood of having a stroke or a systemic embolism, according to a new research study. [More]
Two-drug combination improves lung function in some cystic fibrosis patients

Two-drug combination improves lung function in some cystic fibrosis patients

The combination of two drugs — an investigational drug used in conjunction with an already FDA-approved medication — improved lung function in patients with one form of cystic fibrosis, according to two new studies. [More]
Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Conjoined twin boys undergo successful separation surgery

Carter and Conner, conjoined twin boys born Dec. 12, 2014, in Jacksonville, Fla., underwent a successful separation surgery on May 7, 2015. The 12-hour surgery was led by a team of highly skilled pediatric specialists that included Daniel Robie, MD, chief of pediatric general surgery, and Nicholas Poulos, MD, pediatric general surgeon, for Nemours Children's Specialty Care and Wolfson Children's Hospital. [More]
Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, received the Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award on April 28 at the University. [More]
UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

Researchers at UC Davis have developed a new intervention that identifies potentially depressed mothers and encourages them to seek treatment. The Motivating our Mothers (MOM) program takes a unique approach, relying on pediatricians rather than the mother's doctor for diagnosis. [More]
Mouth and tongue exercises can significantly reduce snoring frequency

Mouth and tongue exercises can significantly reduce snoring frequency

A Google search using the key words "snoring" and "treatment" yielded over 5 million results, but no standard treatment is available for primary snoring or snoring associated with a mild form of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Global haemophilia therapeutics market estimated to reach $13.43 billion in 2019

Global haemophilia therapeutics market estimated to reach $13.43 billion in 2019

Increased uptake of recombinant therapies and prophylactic use, coupled with improved diagnosis of haemophilia, is expected to drive the associated therapeutics market. Recombinant therapies are likely to command a premium price and fuel growth in developed markets, while heightened access to treatment and larger patient volumes due to more funding for critical care are anticipated to contribute to demand in emerging markets. [More]
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