Crohn's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Crohn's Disease News and Research

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel affecting at least 115,000 people in the UK. The condition usually develops in teenagers and young adults, but can be diagnosed at any age and is equally common in men and women.

The condition can affect any part of the digestive tract between the mouth and the anus, although inflammation in the last section of the small bowel (ileum) or the first part of the large bowel (colon) is most common.

Crohn's disease is a ‘relapsing and remitting’ condition characterized by symptom-free periods followed by episodes of “flare-ups,” during which symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever and fatigue may become particularly bothersome.

Long term, severe inflammation can damage sections of the digestive system, resulting in additional complications, such as a tear in the wall of the anus (fissure), narrowing of the intestine (stricture) or the formation of an abnormal connection between the bowel and another body part such as the bladder, vagina or skin (fistula). Such problems usually require surgical treatment to correct. Crohn's disease also increases the risk of developing bowel cancer.

The exact cause of Crohn's disease is not clear but experts believe a combination of factors may be at work including genetics, immune responses to certain bacteria or viruses and lifestyle factors such as diet or smoking status.
CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology is committed to publishing impactful digestive biology research covering a broad spectrum of themes in GI, hepatology and pancreatology. We wanted to share two new CMGH articles, which both offer important insight into future interventions for chronic conditions. [More]
ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be effective for detecting ulcerative colitis

ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be effective for detecting ulcerative colitis

A minimally invasive screening for ulcerative colitis, a debilitating gastrointestinal tract disorder, using emerging infrared technology could be a rapid and cost-effective method for detecting disease that eliminates the need for biopsies and intrusive testing of the human body, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

As its name suggests, inflammatory bowel disease, which afflicts more than 1.6 million Americans, involves chronic inflammation of all or some of the digestive tract. An autoimmune disease known to have a strong genetic component, its symptoms are abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and fever and, sometimes, weight loss. IBD, which is a group of inflammatory conditions, includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Researchers at UiO and NCMM have discovered that the system used by bacteria to transport magnesium is so sensitive that it can detect a pinch of magnesium salt in a swimming pool. [More]
Children of salmon-eating mothers less likely to develop asthma

Children of salmon-eating mothers less likely to develop asthma

Children born to mothers who eat salmon when pregnant may be less likely to have doctor diagnosed asthma compared to children whose mothers do not eat it, new research has shown. [More]
Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) for multiple indications. Inflectra is administered by intravenous infusion. This is the second biosimilar approved by the FDA. [More]
Smoking drastically alters oral microbiome, study finds

Smoking drastically alters oral microbiome, study finds

Smoking drastically alters the oral microbiome, the mix of roughly 600 bacterial species that live in people's mouths. This is the finding of a study led by NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center to be published online March 25 in the ISME (International Society for Microbial Ecology) Journal. [More]
Global research links genes to five common, hard-to-treat inflammatory diseases

Global research links genes to five common, hard-to-treat inflammatory diseases

A global study involving 50 different research centres has found hundreds of genes which cause five common, hard-to-treat and debilitating inflammatory diseases, paving the way to new treatments for these conditions [More]
Secretory capacity of human gut does not decline with age, shows study

Secretory capacity of human gut does not decline with age, shows study

A breakthrough in basic research and the first comprehensive study on the secretory activity of the human intestine: over a period of eight years, Dr. Dagmar Krüger of the Department of Human Biology at TU Munich has examined more than 2200 specimens from around 450 patients with bowel disease. [More]
Incidence of IBD much higher in Rhode Island

Incidence of IBD much higher in Rhode Island

A study led by the Hasbro Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases found that the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Rhode Island is one of the highest ever reported in the United States and that IBD rates nationally are much higher than previously reported. [More]

Current DRG-based cost recovery system appears problematic for patients with complex disorders

A new study by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin compares the true cost of treating patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease with costs recoverable under the current German DRG-based system. [More]
Study highlights dual role of cytokine in inflammatory bowel disease

Study highlights dual role of cytokine in inflammatory bowel disease

Small proteins that affect communication between cells play an important role in regulating inflammation that occurs during inflammatory bowel disease, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Emory University, the University of Michigan and Amgen, a biotechnology company. [More]
Research findings identify potential genetics-guided precision medicine for leukemia patients

Research findings identify potential genetics-guided precision medicine for leukemia patients

An international research team has determined how inherited gene variations lead to severe drug toxicity that may threaten chances for a cure in children with leukemia. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, results of which set the stage to expand the use of a patient's genetic make-up to tailor chemotherapy. [More]
Remicade co-developer funds new microscopy facility on Scripps Florida campus

Remicade co-developer funds new microscopy facility on Scripps Florida campus

The co-developer of Remicade, one of the three top-selling drugs in the world, has donated more than $500,000 to fund what will be known as the Iris and Junming Le Foundation Super-Resolution Microscopy Facility on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute. [More]
Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have solved the atomic structure of a unique ubiquitin ligase complex. Ubiquitin is best known for its role in protein degradation, but more recently seen as important for cell signaling, DNA repair, anti-inflammatory, and immune responses. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announces FDA approval of Cosentyx for treatment of adult patients with AS and PsA

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Cosentyx (secukinumab) for two new indications - the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Processed foods may increase likelihood of developing autoimmune diseases

Processed foods may increase likelihood of developing autoimmune diseases

In today's hustle and bustle world, processed foods are commonplace time-savers. But that convenience factor may come with a bigger price tag than previously known, says an international team of researchers. [More]
Immune enters into exclusive license with Atlante Biotech for new format of bispecific antibodies

Immune enters into exclusive license with Atlante Biotech for new format of bispecific antibodies

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. a clinical-stage company developing novel therapies for the treatment of immuno-inflammatory diseases and cancer, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with Atlante Biotech SAS, to the patents and know-how for a new format of bispecific antibodies. [More]
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